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FISD E-11 BLASTER REFERENCE

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#24 - The Scope Rail

 

This part should be made from metal (steel or aluminum, thickness 1.5 ~ 2mm) and will later be used to mount the scope and the Hengstler counter. Aluminum is easier to shape and strong enough to support the weight of real components. If using a vice for bending, make sure this does not damage the surface of your metal strip. Accessory placement: The rear foot of the scope should be aligned with the folding stock pivot. The top of the counter should be aligned with the centerline of the scope. The Hengstler logo should be aligned with the front foot of the scope.

 

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Screen accurate vs. idealized: The screen used rails were not 100% parallel to the receiver tube. On the front end, these rested closer to the receiver (not perfectly horizontal to the receiver the entire length). Also the bend itself was not exactly a "sharp" 90 degrees bend, but more rounded. See some movie stills (picture 1) and build threads (picture 2) to help you to decide how you want yours to look like.

 

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The rail can be made from one part (counter bracket included) or two parts (counter bracket made separately). For the one-pieced version, you will need a metal sheet big enough to cut the complete shape, including the arm/bracket to hold the counter box. The two-pieced version is a bit easier. Make the long rail first and then make a separate little part for the counter box. The bracket will then be mounted to the underside of the long rail. This somewhat reduces the space between the receiver tube and the rail which will require smaller screw heads to be used for mounting everything. This is also to prevent the screw heads from possibly scratching the receiver.

 

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Attention: Check references regarding the position of scope and counter before drilling any holes into the rail! When you are sure about the placement, transfer the holes from your scope's feet onto the rail (and if applicable to the counter arm). Pay close attention to every step while doing this! Also there is no right or wrong way about what end to start with first.

 

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Study available graphics before bending the metal stripe. A little cut on the underside (crosswise) will make it easier and guide the metal to bend evenly and correctly. Then shape the front end to fit into the first venting hole on top of the receiver tube. Leave a little "tongue" which you can bend towards the front muzzle. This will protect your rail from falling out. The visible area between the receiver tube and the rail's front bend can be shaped to smoothly fit the receiver's contour.

 

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Mounting the rear end of the scope rail provides three options to choose from. It can be shaped to simply fit straight into the rear sight (screwed directly down into the sight base), or it can have an additional 90 degrees upwards bend (mounted through the rear sight with a nut and a bolt). A shorter rail can also be mounted to the receiver tube with a "Z-bend" just before the rear sight. Note: For the 90 degrees upwards bend we did not yet find any screen references.

 

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Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team
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#25 - The Hengstler Counter

 

Mod A:   Sand down the front half of the resin counter to have a flat "face". Use the measurement diagram to create a recess for the new number window at the correct position. Get the "printed numbers" and make sure they fit into the new opening. Cut a piece of Plexiglas to fit into that and sand or file the window front to get the D-shape. Then patiently sand and polish it to get a clear view through it. Use sandpaper grits like 180, 220, 320, 400, 600 and 1000. The polishing wheel from your rotary tool (at the lowest speed) will help for the final glossy surface finish. Do not glue the printed numbers to the Plexiglas or into the recess. Only use very little glue to install the new window.

 

counter_glass.jpg

 

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Mod B:   The original counters were available with and without a manual reset button. To recreate a reset button, take a piece of plastic (3mm thick) and work it to have the correct shape. It can be glued to the counter but will very likely break off. To avoid this, it can be made longer to rest deeper in a slot.

For a moveable reset button you need a sheet of plastic, sized to match the "face" of your resin counter (25 x 50 mm). Create cutouts for the number window and the reset button by using the measurement diagram to have these at the correct places. Sand down the "face" of the resin counter according to the thickness of your plastic sheet. Transfer the opening for the button onto the resin body behind the sheet with a pencil. Make a recess for the hidden part of the button into the resin body and drill a hole in the center for a small spring from a ballpoint pen. Cut the spring to the required length and test fit everything before adding glue. When the new "face" has been installed, the remaining gap to the resin body can get closed with modeling clay or bondo cream. If your resin counter lacks the details on the bottom, these can be recreated with pieces from a 1mm ABS sheet. To get the correct dimensions, just see the top of your counter's bracket, as the original sockets were designed to be slot-fitted into each other. So, bottom and top are inverted.

 

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Mod C:   If available, real parts can be added to the resin counter for a more realistic view. For example the little screw on top of the cover, the brass screw next to the Hengstler logo, the electrical connector block or even the soldering pins.

 

Mod D:   The "Conversion Counter" actually is the front half of a counter, very identical to the Hengstler 400 Series. It requires a resin counter, which is included in most available kits. Cut off the rear half of the resin counter and mount or glue it to the front half from the conversion kit. To get additional stabilization, the counter arm from the scope rail can be modified to support both, the front and the rear half of the conversion counter.

 

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Mod E:   All previous steps can be ignored when buying a real Hengstler 400 counter. But be aware of the many different versions you might find:

 

- 4 to 8 number rolls

- sometimes the last 2 numbers are in a different color (yellow or red)

- sometimes the last 2 or 3 rolls are in a different color (white)

- with or without mechanical reset button

- old Eagle-logo or the H-logo

- gold-coloured metal socket or black plastic socket

- with or without the 2 soldering pins

- window in D-shape or flat

- with or without small screws in the front cover

- with or without "Hengstler 400" thermal stamp on the counter face

 

You can examine some counter variations in chapter #33 - Gallery

 

However, the screen accurate counter should have 6 numbers (all white lettering on black background), a reset button and ideally it will have the old Hengstler logo, showing the numbers 8, 9 and 0 flanked by two wings - the "Eagle Counter".

 

A very useful "HOWTO" had already been created by Aaron (usaeatt2). The link can be found here.

 

Mod F:   Coiled wires between the counter and the cylinders were not used on screen, only on promotional pictures.

 

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Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team
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#26 - The Power Cylinders

 

Andy (PlayfulWolfCub) has done an incredible research on this part and we highly recommend his PDF document, which can be found here.

 

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Mod A:   You can run a scratch build or modify the resin version from your blaster kit (if available). A useful "HOWTO" had already been created by Tino (T-Jay). The link can be found here.

 

Mod B:   Another thing you can do is to completely replace the power cylinders with a more accurate version, available on the FISD.

 

Mod C:   And you can scratch build these from metal. A useful thread had already been created by Aaron (usaeatt2). The link can be found here.

 

Placement of power cylinders can be parallel to the receiver or parallel to the end of the magazine well. Both is screen accurate. Make sure to place the power cylinders towards the outer edge of the magazine well, to avoid any problems with the holster.

Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team

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#27 - Assembling

 

As there are various resin kits available, each of them unique in their own way, there is no chance to create a universal step-by-step guide. However, you should begin with selecting your favourite modifications, depending on your kit, skill level and personal preferences. To avoid any conflicts within selected mods, re-check if some of these might affect others. Start doing the individual mods for each part and try not to glue anything at this early stage. Think of accessibility to each part (also the small ones) for painting. Glue only when you can be absolutely sure, you will not have to disassemble that specific section later. Surfaces to glue should be roughly sanded before applying the glue. For resin to resin connections CA glue works best, while resin to aluminium requires universal liquid glue. Whatever you choose, make sure it is instructed for use with the materials in your build.

Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team
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#28 - Painting

 

It is highly recommended to wear some form of respiratory protection when working with spray paint. All surfaces that will later be glued can be covered with masking tape, so you save yourself from laborious paint removing for better adhesion. In case your kit parts got heavily sanded or dusted during the build, it might be an option to wash all parts again like shown in chapter #03. Before adding any paint to a part, make sure these have fully dried and use a primer first. When applying primer and paint, try to keep the layers thin, as several coats of thick paint will reduce the details on the surface. This is especially important for paint jobs with multiple layers and structured paint. Avoid any paint tears on your build - these were only on the TK helmets.

Decide how you want your blaster to look like. Flat black finish with no weathering like seen at the Death Star? Heavily weathered Tunisian Bapty from Tatooine? Crinkle paint as the real Sterlings had? You see, there are various ways to build a screen accurate blaster. The same can be said for the paintjob itself.

 

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Mod A:   Simply use flat black spray color on all parts for a factory-new look. Gloss black is not recommended for the gun's main body.

 

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Mod B:   The grip from the original Sterlings was some kind of black plastic, which can be recreated with semi gloss or gloss black paint.

 

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Mod C:   Parts in the trigger group and the inner bolts were made from metal. Check reference pictures and use some metallic-grey or steel-like colors for these.

 

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Mod D:   Using two slightly different kinds of black on separate parts can make your build appear much more realistically. Attention: Separate your build parts in two groups: 1) components representing the Sterling. 2) additions by the prop makers for turning it into an E-11 blaster (scope, scope rail, counter box, power cylinders and T-tracks). Do not use different types of black within the gun's body.

 

Mod E:   In case a dry-brush weathering (see chapter #29) is not sufficient for your build, you can integrate a layer of metallic-grey or steel-like color after priming and before applying the black paint. When later weathering edges and corners with sandpaper, this will result in having nice metal effects shining through the black color, looking like heavy usage. Alternatively you can mask off some places before adding the black paint. Masked spots will later look like paintchips. Attention: This is only to be used for parts of the main gun and the power cylinders - not for other additions like scope, scope rail, counter box and T-tracks. Full resin builders will have to cover the T-tracks with tape, as these are one part with the receiver tube and can not be separated.

 

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Mod F:   To recreate the structured surface of some real Sterlings, you can integrate another paint layer - crinkle paint or hammered finish paint. Attention: This is only to be used for parts of the main gun, except the grip, the trigger section and the magazine. Do also not use this for the additions by the prop makers (scope, scope rail, counter box, power cylinders and T-tracks). Order of layers: primer, metallic grey, structured paint, flat black. The metallic grey is not mandatory if you plan to add dry-brush weathering instead of sandpaper weathering. For the crinkle paint, please exactly follow the instructions on the spray can. The hammered finish paint can be paper dabbed with a kitchen roll paper while drying to add more structure to its surface. Depending on how that layer looks, you could possibly skip the last black coating.

 

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Mod G:   The scope should be painted in brass. Before adding the black layer, mask the feets (both feet on bottom and rear foot on the sides too) and run a thin wire through that gap at the front. When the black paint fully dried, you can unmask everything and weather the scope with fine sandpaper. Alternatively you can skip the brass coat, add the black paint and some brass colored dry-brushing.

 

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Mod H:   The counter should be painted in flat black. Make sure to cover the counter window from the outside and the inside. Do the same for the number rolls, as you don't want any paint fog on these. When using a real counter, cover the coil if you later still want to have that label visible.

 

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Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team

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#29 - Weathering

 

Mod A:   The dry-brush method is the only way to add weathering, if your kit has simply been spray painted in flat black without any metallic paint layer underneath. It simply means to reduce some metallic looking paint on a brush to a very little rest, so it only leaves some thin paint "scratches" instead of a thick glossy wet surface. This technique adds a lot of realism when carefully used on parts, representing steel or metal. However, do not do this on your T-tracks and grip as those parts are not made from steel. For the scope and Hengstler counter it may only be done with brass color. Be aware the counter bracket was made from brass, but not the counter housing with the window. This was grey plastic. See end of this chapter for weathering on scope and counter.
 
Mod B:   In case you decide to do a paintjob with multiple layers, including the metallic-grey or steel-like color, you can choose from 2 different techniques:

1) weathering edges and corners with fine sandpaper will result in having nice metal effects shining through the black color, looking like heavy usage. 2) during the paint process you can alternatively mask off some spots of your metallic looking layer with a masking fluid or candle wax. Leave these masks until the last layer has been applied. After removing, it will look like real paint chips.
 
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Mod C:   A combination of all weathering methods (dry brushing, sandpaper and maskings) can help making your build look more realistically.
 
Mod D:   Real rust can be milled to fine powder, which can be added in just a few spots where the real Sterlings had rust. Powder can be brushed onto the last paint layer while this is drying, or it can be mixed into rust color paint (like Humbrol 113).
 
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On the scope you can use the dry-brushing method and the sandpaper weathering, while the paintchip method is a bit too much. The other techniques simply look more real on this part. The imprints in your scope can get filled with white crayon. Any excess can be removed with a cloth. If the imprints are filled only partially it helps making the scope look really old and used.
 
104.png
 
On the counter you can use the dry-brushing method and the sandpaper weathering, while the paintchip method is a bit too much. The other techniques simply
look more real on this part. The unpainted counters below show, only the bracket was brass while the cover was grey plastic. Bear this in mind when doing dry-brushing to avoid having brass at the wrong counter half.
 
105.png
 
No weathering on T-tracks. These should have flat black or semi gloss black with no weathering at all.

Important: Whenever doing weathering (no matter what kind of), ask yourself how the real part would look like after being used for many years. Surfaces will be
worn through, paint will come off in stressed areas, there will be paint chips where metal hit metal (like on the bayonet lug or the magazine well), moving parts may leave fine scratches and so on. Also weathering in reality looks sometimes different as on posted pictures, because some cameras have problems catching subtile weathering. You have the parts in hands and you decide about how much weathering you go for. But sometimes less is more and makes the whole thing believable. Try to avoid overdone weathering, even if it is fun doing it.

Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team

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#31 - Measurements

 

End Cap Clip:

Clip length:                                                    1.463" (37.160mm)

Clip width:                                                      0.258" (6.553mm)

Clip T-head length:                                        0.174" (4.420mm)

Clip T-head width:                                          0.375" (9.525mm)

Clip overall thickness/height:                         0.178" (4.521mm)

Diamond knurling length (120deg cross):      0.355" (9.017mm)

Locking pin bottom diameter:                         0.123" (3.124mm)

Locking pin length below flush                       0.110" (2.794mm)

Locking pin top diameter:                              0.090" (2.286mm)

Locking pin head above flush:                       0.032" (0.813mm)

Locking pin CENTER from T-end:                  0.084" (2.134mm)

Spring rivet diameter:                                    0.104" (2.642mm)

Spring pin head above flush:                         0.024" (0.610mm)

Spring length:                                                1.075" (27.305mm)

Spring width:                                                  0.231" (5.867mm)

Pivot pin diameter:                                         0.096" (2.438mm)

Pivot pin length:                                             0.376" (9.550mm)

Pivot hole CENTER (from knurled end):        0.540" (13.716mm)

Channel length:                                             1.285" (32.639mm)

Channel width (outside):                                0.380" (9.652mm)

Channel width (inside):                                  0.259" (6.579mm)

Channel height:                                             0.325" (8.255mm)

Channel hole CENTER (from knurled end):   0.565" (14.351mm)

 

Muzzle screws:

Head Diameter:                                              0.368" (9.347mm)

Head Height:                                                  0.252" (6.401mm)

Thread diameter:                                           0.245" (6.223mm)

Thread Length:                                              0.643" (16.332mm)

Overall Length:                                              0.895" (22.733mm)

Hex wrench size:                                            3/16"

 

Grip screw:

Head Diameter:                                              0.366" (9.296mm)

Head Height:                                                  0.252" (6.401mm)

Thread diameter:                                           0.246" (6.248mm)

Thread Length:                                              1.273" (32.334mm)

Threaded Area:                                             1.073" (27.254mm)

Unthreaded Area:                                          0.200" (5.080mm)

Unthreaded Diameter:                                   0.250" (6.350mm)

Overall Length:                                              1.525" (38.735mm)

Hex wrench size:                                            3/16"

 

Ejector Retaining Screw:

1/4" X 28 TPI

Hex wrench size:                                            1/8"

Overall diameter:                                           0.247" (6.274mm)

Threaded length:                                           0.382" (9.703mm)

Overall length:                                               0.508" (12.903mm)

 

Closest metric size:                                        M6 X 0.75 pitch X 10mm

 

D-Ring:

Overall width:                                                 1.688" (42.875mm)

Overall height:                                                0.750" (19.050mm)

Round bar thickness:                                     0.188" (4.775mm)

Bends inside diameter:                                   0.375" (9.525mm)

 

Charging handle:

Gap between handle and slot with bolt closed:         3.5mm

 

Rear sight:

Fitting a rail - run an 8-32 tap through the 100 meter peephole, then use an 8-32 X 1/4" hex head

 

Steel receiver tube:

1.5" OD X 1.37" ID X 0.065" Wall

 

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Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team

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#32 - Downloads

 

Full content as downloadable PDF document in DIN-A4 size (6,51 MB and 101 pages)

Full content as downloadable PDF document in US letter size (6,46 MB and 92 pages)

Sterling parts in downloadable PDF document Photo Compendium (15,4 MB and 63 pages)

 

The PDFs are direct copies of this thread content, with only minimum changes to optimize some page breaks here and there.

If you find any other substantive differences, please send a PM.

 

Think before printing - please consider your responsibility to the environment before printing a PDF. Thank you.

Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team
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Epilogue

 

This reference is the result of months of work taking place behind the scenes, through extensive collaboration online. The intent is not to serve as a "HOWTO" for a resin E-11 build, but to serve as inspiration for those who would like to take on the challenges of modifying their builds in some small way, or many small ways.

 

Should you have questions about anything you see here, don't hesitate to ask one of the members of the team. This reference is a living document, and who knows what may be added to it in the future. Perhaps one of you reading this will one day come up with a modification that has not been thought of yet and it will change how Troopers and Cadets build their E-11s forever. If you do, don't be surprised if you're asked for some assistance in bringing that modification to the reference for sharing with the community here.
 

So, there it is. For now, we will leave it here, as is, in the vein of Troopers (and in some cases, Cadets) Helping Troopers. We all hope it serves to help a great many of you in leading the next wave of E-11 builds into a new level of fun and realism, and thank so many of you who came before us for inspiring each of us in so many ways.

 

Thank you for reading and be sure to share this information with anyone who can use it.

 

With Unquestioned Loyalty.

 

- The Members of the E-11 Reference Team

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Edited by FISD E-11 Reference Team
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As promised in the July newsletter,

 

Here is the E-11 Blaster Reference!  

 

Enjoy!

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This is a fantastic reference resource and must have taken untold hours to put together so thank you very much for your amazing amount of effort.

 

Once more a great example of troopers helping troopers......and in my case at least a trainee trooper.

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Thank you very much for putting this all together! I will be using this reference with my new doopydoos E11 blaster kit and T-jay's completion kit.

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I'm sure it took them at least a day or 2!

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Some statistics - in case anybody cares ;)

 

- 5 persons
- 6 months (started 12th of January 2015)
- 31 chapters
- 292 pictures
- 430 emails
- and countless hours of spare time

Edited by T-Jay
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Hats off to all the contributors to this guide!

 

Thanks a lot! This really helps with my build and clears up a lot of doubts I had about the correct installment of certain parts

Edited by VulpX
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Guys, this is truly awesome work, and I believe, takes most of the guess work out of the equation.

I will be using this for my next E11 pipe build project.

Excellent, excellent resource, congrats to all involved.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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This reference a thing of beauty! Sensational work team!

 

It may have taken many hours to put together... but will safe future troopers many hours of research!

 

Our blasters will just keep getting better and better :)

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Wow guys. This exceeds any expectation I had when you nerds explained what you had intended to write. I know the plan morphed along the way.

 

This is an example of a few amazing things about FISD. Mostly troopers helping troopers. But also the depth and breadth of knowledge our members have. FISD experts always blow me away. The skills of our members make my jaw drop. Lastly I love seeing a cooperative group working together to build something amazing. 

 

Thank you thank you thank you.

 

This would make an amazing ipad app don't you think?

 

-Eric

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Troopers helping Troopers. Indeed a very fine example!

Thank you for your excellent work. And just at the right time: I`ve been thinking about a new E-11 the last few days ;)

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Wow guys. This exceeds any expectation I had when you nerds explained what you had intended to write. I know the plan morphed along the way.

 

This is an example of a few amazing things about FISD. Mostly troopers helping troopers. But also the depth and breadth of knowledge our members have. FISD experts always blow me away. The skills of our members make my jaw drop. Lastly I love seeing a cooperative group working together to build something amazing.

 

Thank you thank you thank you.

 

This would make an amazing ipad app don't you think? -Eric

 

...with a shooting gallery that counts calories burned while terminating rebel scum!

 

LOL, by definition, groups like FISD are WAY MORE geek than nerd.

 

For me, the best part of the whole project was working with an awesome bunch of guys and getting to know them much better through the hundreds of communications we shared. Above ALL other forums I'm involved with, FISD truly feels like family and I always look forward to my time here.

 

Thanks VERY MUCH for your compliments, Eric!

Edited by usaeatt2
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I agree with everyone above - this is an incredible resource! Awesome job by the reference team!

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Perfect timing. My kit is in the mail and I plan on doing some of these mods. You guys did an awesome job. I really appreciate it. Thanks!!

 

Sent from my SPH-L720T using Tapatalk

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