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Khazid

Phoenix Props ANH E-11 Pipe Build

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This will be quite the paint job!

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Another two weeks has passed and it is time for another update. I committed to showing all of you the back of the circuit board that I fried so that you can see the wiring. Here you go…

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It is a shame that I shorted out the main chip. Thankfully, when I got the replacement programmed I put it back onto the testing breadboard to check out my counter electronics; nothing was fried in there. I dodged a blaster bolt there! Just have to replace this main board with all the wiring. I am still waiting on the replacement LED drivers to arrive, but I am already wiring in a new board to replace the one pictured above. The layout will not change as it was my own stupidity that fried the Arduino.

 

While waiting, I decided to go back and address my front sight. I had accidentally filed the needle point on the wrong side and had originally decided to just say a left handed trooper owned the weapon and would flip it around so that the lock nut was on the same side as a the magazine. Yeah, yeah, it was bugging me too. Time to fix it! I cut off the old needle and bored out the top of the sight. Since I was here, I might as well replace it with a correct looking blob as the actual sterling front sight is a small bolt where the needle extends from.

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I didn’t take a picture of the final trimming, but in that last picture you can see that I have a small rounded section that protrudes from the sight encapsulating the needle for the sight. I feel oh so much better now. :)

 

Prepping for paint was my next project. I already posted my paint swatches above for comment and critique. Still looking for feedback if any of you have it to give. Here is a nice shot of my spray booth. It is a 4’ wide, 38†deep, 36†tall box constructed of 1†pvc. The primary joints are not glued, so the whole kit will come apart when I am done painting for storage. In the back of the box I have a 20†box fan that is pulling air out of the booth. Between the booth and the box fan I have two inexpensive house HVAC filters. This is to remove the paint particulates that are in the air. The entire booth is covered in 8mil painters plastic that is taped down with blue tape. I vent this out of my garage with air duct that is attached to the back. In all the booth cost about $200 to build, but can be used in many formats, including taking to an armor build party for people to use.

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For the rest of my paint prep it was all about masking off for final assembly. Glue does not like paint and instead of doing sanding later with a dremel, I did a dry fit of each part not attached to the barrel prior to painting, outlined it in sharpie, then put masking tape into those locations leaving about 1/8 of an inch for paint to create a seam. This will give solid adhesion when I get to final assembly, but allow me to do all the painting.

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Here is another example, this time on the bottom of the power cylinders. Notice again, the edging that will get paint, but I am ok with that.

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The only other project prior to painting was to finish my scope assembly. First up was the easy part, the front. I cut out a piece of CD-Rom and then glued that piece to the lens I trimmed down several weeks ago. A little dremel work to sand it flush and it was time to glue into the front of the scope. The purplish effect from the cd-rom backing is most impressive.

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Now for the fun part, the front layers. First up was putting on all the decals onto the clear styrene. I used Micro Set  to get the decals on, then applied four layers of pure Future to seal them. It took a couple of days to get all that done as it takes a while for Future to completely set so that it isn’t tacky.

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For the layer closest to the LED, the back of the styrene was scuffed with 300 grit sand paper to further diffuse the light. Then it was painted with the Tamiya Clear Green paint. Two layers of the paint did the trick.

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Once dry, that was attached flush to the reflector that acts as the base of the front targeting computer.

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Two tiny strips of the clear styrene acted as stabilizers so I could glue in each layer. Here is the completed unit prior to trimming those stabilizing strips flush to the uppermost layer.

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The LED was then glued to the back of the base and the unit was epoxied into the scope. Some magic sculpt to hide the seams and strips gave me a base for the front lens, which then was also filled along the outer edge with a small ribbon of magic sculpt. Once painting is nearly complete, this part of the scope will be painted in brass, with a layer of patina created by the Tamiya Clear Green to represent aging of the brass. Here are the final results with the LED off, and then on. It is very hard to see with the pictures, but the illusion of a three dimensional sight inside the scope is great. I even got lucky and some small dust particles and scratches stayed in place, giving the sight the appropriate aging that I had hoped to see. To say I’m pleased with the final outcome is putting it lightly.

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Nothing holding me back from paint now, so over the next two weeks that will be the focus. Once paint is done, then it is all about waiting on the LED drivers to finish the electrical. Final assembly is around the corner, I can taste it.

Besides, my MTK brown box is calling me. I truly hope that the armor is not as complicated to assemble as I have made this E-11. LOL.

 

Until next time, Krazy Khazid is signing off.

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The time has come; these will be the final posts of this E-11 build. I truly hope you have enjoyed watching me get to this point, as much as I have enjoyed sharing it with you.

 

We last left off with the scope assembly being completed. At this point I did one more test of the electronics and discovered that the reed switch was just not functioning as intended. I could get the system to turn on, but it would then stay on, unless I inserted a piece of plastic to break the magnetic field. Instead of fiddling with the system as I had designed it, I just accepted the failure and changed the system. The reed switch was eliminated, and in its place I put a very small two position slide switch, rated for 0.3 amps. The weapon selector will now only slide up and down, but the illusion is still in place and the switch is not visible at all in final assembly.

 

With that tackled, it is now time for paint. I masked off the sections I didn’t want covered with my base pattern. I also used a liquid masking product that I have used in the past to give me spots for some of the minor weathering that I plan on adding. The product is Liquid Masking Film by Bob Dively. Originally designed for RC aircraft, it works great on modeling projects like this, especially for creating a mound of film that I can later fleck off with a toothpick. The trick is lots of thin layers.

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Next everything was put into the booth and the painting began.

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Here is another shot with some coats that were drying.

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Here is a close up shot of the counter and scope rail; coats are done, just waiting to apply the top coat.

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The top coating was applied using my airbrush and a small compressor.

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Here is almost the same angle of the counter, top coat in place. When the top coat was applied it really brought out the black fleck coat that was my knockdown spray. I am very pleased with the results.

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Paint was left to dry for three days to ensure all the coats and top coat had properly bonded.

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It was now time for final assembly; here you can see the layout of all the parts that had to be put together. I almost felt like a gun smith at this point, all the moving parts needing to come together.

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First up was attaching the D-ring and its retainer to the butt cap.

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In this shot you’ll see some bare aluminum pipe for the grip, and zebra striping of the same where the T-tracks will go. I masked off these areas on purpose during painting to ensure proper glue adhesion. Glue does not like paint.

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You will have noticed at the top of the above picture a piece of 2x4 with a pre drilled hole. Borrowing from the community here, I will use this jig to help with the bending of the T-Tracks. Here is a close up shot of that jig. After drilling the hole, I added a small shim of dowel to make sure I get a nice solid 90 degree angle.

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Once measured, the T-Track was put in the hole.

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Heat was applied with a heat gun for approximately 20 seconds; this made the track flexible enough to bend.

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I used the back of my electricians’ grips to flare out the edges.

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The same process was repeated for all of the T-Tracks. Since each track would potentially have a different length, I measured each track individually. To keep track of what track went where, I used a pin vise to drill a shallow hole in each track. This hole was on the underside where it attaches to the barrel, drilled just deep enough to be seen, but not through the track. The first track was by the ejection port, and they were labeled sequentially until I got to track number six. The sixth track having six little holes in the back.

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Here they are attached. As a side note, this assembly was completed on 5/31 at the Channel Islands Squad armor build party.

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Next up was putting the mesh screen behind the spring façade. This will help hide all the wiring on all but the closest of inspections.

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That completed, it was time to install the main circuit board into the bolt. Here you see the barrel LED and primary circuit board glued into place.

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Here is a close up shot of the main circuit board. Of course, this is the second board I had to build thanks to the slight mishap I experienced.

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That completed, the nozzle LED could be installed.

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Some more testing was done to ensure everything was still working as anticipated, and then it was time to lay out the tools for threading all those wire assemblies. This is a collection of dental picks and vehicle wiring pull tools that I have around the workshop.

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The wiring was pulled out the front of the barrel and then attached to the circuit board. Here you will see a picture of the bolt assembly being pushed into place.

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Three hours later, I had that in place and it was time for the power cylinder wires. I took my time as I didn't want any more mishaps with the electronics. I should note that I realized there was a lot more wiring than anticipated. This resulted in the need to remove one of the two speakers from the build. Not a big deal, the sound is still plenty loud.

 

These are single core electric guitar wiring that are cloth wrapped. Due to it being a single core, the wire has nice memory retention on coils. I used a ¼ inch dowel to wrap the wiring prior to clipping and installation.

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After the glue dried, the coils were shaped and here is the result.

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Edited by Khazid

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Chapter 3 – Final Assembly

The following pictures are the final shots of the build. This blaster is done. Minimal weathering was applied, just enough to show light usage.

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Oh…one last thing. I seem to remember a phrase used in some other threads by the vets…If you don’t have a picture, it didn’t happen. In the spirit of that, I have one more piece to share with you, a video representing the lights and sounds of the build. Enjoy!

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Epilogue

I learned a lot through this build. After nearly 200 pictures have been posted, several circuit boards and LED’s were fried, and one quick video was produced I believe the goal I set for myself has been hit.

 

I wanted to have an E-11 (ANH style) that would on a scale of 1-10, be a 7 in accuracy. I think I got there, what do you think?

 

Comments and feedback are welcomed, I need to go get organized for my ANH Stunt build.... ;)

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Great job, love it! You really knocked it out of the park. I watched the whole video this morning over cereal :D

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I just watched the video and I'm amazed with your electronics - the blaster looks and sounds great!

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Great job, love it! You really knocked it out of the park. I watched the whole video this morning over cereal :D

 

 I just had the oddest picture of you Derrek, hunched over a large bowl (Will Ferrel from Old School large) of captain crunch, chuckling at my flubbed lines with molds curing in the background for the next version of your kit.. LOL

Thank you for the kind words.

 

 

I just watched the video and I'm amazed with your electronics - the blaster looks and sounds great!

 

 Thank you Richard for the feedback. I cannot take credit for the electronics concept, it is all Skyone's. I only modified the code and the installation slightly to suit my own tastes. If his thread didn't exist, I doubt this build would.

 

 

Phenomenal build! Awesome watching it all come together - great Job!

 

 Thank you Constantin, it was an adventure. I appreciate your feedback. When the going got tough with this, it was really the community here that kept the wind in my sails. Especially when I fried my first completed board, that was a dark day.

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What a fun read. Glad to see it finished all up and working the way you wanted, you should be proud. I'm considering opening my DVH bolt too but feel bad!😱 lol. I liked the video demo, good luck with your bbb

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Awesome job!  Post us a vid with the electronics firing off! 

 

It's in there, towards the end.

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Thanks Derrek!  That was freeking AWESOME!!  Wow everyone needs to watch this video, this is a work of art.  

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Really clever work with the electronics!  Love the way the counter dropped and then produced an "empty clip" sound once drained.  The reset button to "reload" was brilliant.  Best of the electronic additions that I've seen.  I'll be satisfied if I can just port the new Disney electronics over to a build when the time comes.

 

Kudos!

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Thanks Derrek!  That was freeking AWESOME!!  Wow everyone needs to watch this video, this is a work of art.  

 

Thank you Scott. I couldn't just have a build with lights and sounds and not have a way to showcase it ;) I am glad you liked it, even with me stumbling over some part names. Did I really call the charging handle a Bolt Handle? ROFL

 

Really clever work with the electronics!  Love the way the counter dropped and then produced an "empty clip" sound once drained.  The reset button to "reload" was brilliant.  Best of the electronic additions that I've seen.  I'll be satisfied if I can just port the new Disney electronics over to a build when the time comes.

 

Kudos!

 

Ed, I really appreciate it. Skyone's build was the inspiration, I just wanted to camoflauge all the buttons, etc. as much as possible. I am glad you liked it.

Yes, I too really like the reset button on the counter as the reload. I still smile every time I push it. If you need help with your Disney port, let me know. I'll do what I can, which is admittedly not a lot but I will offer it will. :)

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Great JOB

I wish I had the knowledge to do that... I'm amazed with your blaster and can't wait to see what extra great stuff you will add to the helmet..... keep us posted

 

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

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Really great build.  Lot of inspiration for my build in there too.  If mine comes out half as good I'll be happy!

 

 I've been following your progress and I have no doubt you'll surpass what I have been able to do. You have a lot more technical skill than I have. I appreciate your comments.

 

Great JOB

I wish I had the knowledge to do that... I'm amazed with your blaster and can't wait to see what extra great stuff you will add to the helmet..... keep us posted

 

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

 

I'll let you in on a secret, my knowledge of electronics was garnered by numerous youtube videos over the last few months. Combine that with Skyone's directions and schematic, and I suddenly look a lot better than I really am. However; I appreciate your comments and will definitely be providing updates on my bucket.

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Very nice build :D

 

But just one thing i noticed, and thought it should be noted, is that your bayonet lug is the wrong way around :)

 

Other then that... looks great...

Edited by Tr00per

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Very nice build :D

 

But just one thing i noticed, and thought it should be noted, is that your bayonet lug is the wrong way around :)

 

Other then that... looks great...

 

Dennis, do you have a reference to show this is the case? Here are three references that I used for my positioning. Unless I am just crazy (which is entirely possible), I believe my orientation to be correct.

 

Ducati's Reference (Pinned thread in this sub-forum)

ducatis%20reference.jpg

 

E-11 Blaster Reference (Pinned thread in this sub-forum)

blasterspecs.jpg

 

Derrek's Build (can find this photo in his build thread, and his sales thread, maker of the Phoenix Props kit)

DDay%20Reference.jpg

Edited by Khazid

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Hi there,  To keep it short....

 

''Bayonet lug placement''

 

Ducati's build = correct

Derrek's build = not correct

 

Here's a pic of a real sterling...

 

Hope this helps...

 

eZ8NiLS.jpg

 

fkDtDma.jpg

 

Cheers,

 

Dennis..

Edited by Tr00per
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Dennis, thanks for posting that. Looks like I will be flipping that part around again.

 

I appreciate the heads up.

Edited by Khazid
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No problem,

 

Hope you can get it fixed without too much trouble,  but then again, someone wouldn't notice it quick the way it sit's now..

 

I thought i should post about it, before people would take your picture's as a reference.....

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