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Diana's RS Props Build- ANH Stunt


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Hello All!     I've been wanting to provide an update for a while, but admittedly it was a busy year.  My TK ended up seeing a great deal of action in 2015, but held up beautifully.  Not a single cr

Ah, thank you.  I do love my white jacket.  I think I drive Kyle crazy with the thing on troops since I'm so fond of it and love showing it off.  My favorite part of it is the inside which Dave Filoni

It has been a year since I started my build.  So, in honor of the big day the brown boxes arrived on my doorstep, I'm doing an update.    Events since my Centurion in late August:   I opted not to

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I always feel like I need a second set of hands while working on split rivets on curved plastic.  This is such a beautiful and conscientious build.  It's going to look amazing. 

Thanks, Todd.  Appreciate the encouragement.  Getting the strapping done has been a bit... ah... frustrating at times, but it's getting done.

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Just know that this build thread will serve as a most useful reference for many new troopers.  

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Wow, looks great.  Why do I feel like i bit off more than I can chew with this project?

In the beginning, LadyinWhite advised me to "throw up, and then get trimming."  So, feeling a bit overwhelmed just makes you like everybody else.

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Continued on with the chest strapping.  Working on the "clamshell" portion.  Now that we mastered rivets, this step went smoothly.

 

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There was finally a break in the rain and the dog needed exercise.  I wanted to test out the fit of my thighs and shins again.  No reason the two couldn't be combined.  I wasn't ready to walk the dog wearing the lower half of my armor, but I wasn't opposed to tossing the ball in the backyard suited up.  It was a good beta-test.  If I could bend down and pick up a tennis ball a hundred times, then my armor truly fit well with minimal chafing.

 

My thighs passed the tennis ball test well although they had a tendency to slide.  I had to hoke them up often.  Definitely need the strap around my waist to be tighter. (Tried to adjust it, but received a set of muddy pawprints on my armor for my lack of attention to more important matters.)  

 

The shins failed the Imperial t-ball test.  They looked clunky and rattled about when I walked.  

 

I studied shin reference pics. I wanted a nice taper.  My thighs were fine, but I was losing it in the shins.

 

gallery_14191_17_2048_zps65d07d2a.jpg

 

I stared at my troublesome shins for a long while.  They were already strapped, but there was no help for it.  They'd have to come apart.

 

Turned out to be an easier task than I thought.  I was even able to carefully pry off some Zap-A-Gap to remove the strapping.  

 

IMG_4601_zps06be840a.jpgIMG_4603_zpsb5eef71b.jpg

I had estimated I wanted to resize them by as much as an inch, but decided I would start with half an inch.  Always easier to trim more later than try to add it back in.

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The shin on the left has been resized and the one on the right is still unmodified. The difference might not be immediately noticeable, but there is a nicer taper to the shin.

 

IMG_4609_zps19b8a807.jpggallery_14191_17_2048_zps65d07d2a.jpg

 

Both shins resized.  Now, the tapering looks screen accurate to me.  Most importantly, the shins felt right.  I wore them for running loads of laundry up and down the stairs and the clunky feeling was gone.  (Although, my shins did keep popping out of my boots.  Wonder if the Imperial Laundry Service has this problem.)

 

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Added the strapping (hooks) back in and also velcro.  The velcro is for me because the hooks were getting on my nerves.  The hooks are there because husband loves his hook system.  I'll tell you one thing.  My shin pieces are never popping off.

Edited by AsBlondeAsLuke
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That looks a lot more than 10 mm. In your pic, the center of your rivet is more than 1/2 inch. 10mm is closer to 3/8 of an inch. I am enjoying the heck out of this build!!

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That looks a lot more than 10 mm. In your pic, the center of your rivet is more than 1/2 inch. 10mm is closer to 3/8 of an inch. I am enjoying the heck out of this build!!

Hi Steve-

 

Thanks for the feedback.  It's 10 mm measured from the center of the rivet to the edge, not counting the return edge. Is there another way to check the measurement?

 

measurement_zps5fa068fa.jpg

Edited by AsBlondeAsLuke
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Hi Steve-

 

Thanks for the feedback.  It's 10 mm measured from the center of the rivet to the edge, not counting the return edge. Is there another way to check the measurement?

 

measurement_zps5fa068fa.jpg

 

Hi Diana!  I'm following your build closely because I'm new and because I'll be trimming just as much as you did.  Keep up the great work!  I love that this is a team project too!

I NEVER trust the end or "tip" of a tape measure or ruler.  The end of a tape measure can be inaccurate because that tip is riveted into SLOTTED holes (this is supposed to provide the flexibility of measuring inside and outside corners) - it's fine if you're measuring 2x4's, but when you get down to millimeters, I would use a different method.  Try "choking up" on the ruler by setting the '3' (30mm) on the edge of the armor.  Now count up '10' lines, which would put your rivet centerline at '2' (20mm).  Obviously, working on a curved surface with a flat measuring device also increases the difficulty.  Granted, we're looking at a picture too, so there may be some 'parallax error' involved (a favorite scientific term).  I'm NOT trying to be critical - just offering a tool "tip" gained through experience with cryogenic turbine assembly (seriously!).  Extra thousandths (millimeters, in this case), add up to what engineers call 'stackable tolerance'.  Too many, and things start getting too tight.  Hey, do I remember you saying your husband is an engineer early in this thread?

 

Also LOVE that you were running around the house in your armor to check fit and comfort.  I plan to adopt your test regimen!

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Hey, that's impressive how you now just move on forward and build this armor by yourselves! You don't seem to need anymore help now :)

That's cool to see guys doing the part of the research job on their own  :duim:

 

However... (because there's always one :P) unfortunately your shins hooks are glued the wrong way. The hook should face inward:

12368222595_9c156f9e67_c.jpg

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Perhaps pictures can be deceiving. The pic above with the metal ruler makes the rivet look farther outside the 10 MM range. The pic above looks closer. Well played. ONWARD, SOLDIER!

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Yeah, she didn't like the original way the straps worked so her hubby and her worked up a new way to make it work.

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Hi Steve-

 

Thanks for the feedback.  It's 10 mm measured from the center of the rivet to the edge, not counting the return edge. Is there another way to check the measurement?

 

measurement_zps5fa068fa.jpg

 

Hi Diana!  I'm following your build closely because I'm new and because I'll be trimming just as much as you did.  Keep up the great work!  I love that this is a team project too!

I NEVER trust the end or "tip" of a tape measure or ruler.  The end of a tape measure can be inaccurate because that tip is riveted into SLOTTED holes (this is supposed to provide the flexibility of measuring inside and outside corners) - it's fine if you're measuring 2x4's, but when you get down to millimeters, I would use a different method.  Try "choking up" on the ruler by setting the '3' (30mm) on the edge of the armor.  Now count up '10' lines, which would put your rivet centerline at '2' (20mm).  Obviously, working on a curved surface with a flat measuring device also increases the difficulty.  Granted, we're looking at a picture too, so there may be some 'parallax error' involved (a favorite scientific term).  I'm NOT trying to be critical - just offering a tool "tip" gained through experience with cryogenic turbine assembly (seriously!).  Extra thousandths (millimeters, in this case), add up to what engineers call 'stackable tolerance'.  Too many, and things start getting too tight.  Hey, do I remember you saying your husband is an engineer early in this thread?

 

Also LOVE that you were running around the house in your armor to check fit and comfort.  I plan to adopt your test regimen!

 

Thanks for the tips, Aaron.  I'll give it a try.  Ah yes, he is, but the engineer isn't available at the moment so it's just me working on the build at the moment.  I was an English major, so while terms like "taper" come easily to me, I needed a full cup of coffee before being able to fully process your cryogenic turbine assembly measuring methods. :)   I get it now.  Just took me two cups of coffee, and Googling "parallax error" to get there.

 

Ah yes.  My test methods get work done around the house and the armor properly fitted.  A win-win for all.

Edited by AsBlondeAsLuke
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Hey, that's impressive how you now just move on forward and build this armor by yourselves! You don't seem to need anymore help now :)

That's cool to see guys doing the part of the research job on their own  :duim:

 

However... (because there's always one :P) unfortunately your shins hooks are glued the wrong way. The hook should face inward:

 

Hi Germain- Thanks for the feedback.  Aw, we always need help.   And, trust me, we always have a lot of questions.

 

We had one week where we did a lot of building because the engineer was home before heading into a crunch time at work.  We called upon somebody in our local garrison (who also has RS) with many of our questions.  We had some very specific questions about the RS strapping system.  We also called upon Steve (WideAMG) who just completed a RS build. 

 

Thank you for the correction on the shins.  I'll get it fixed.  I appreciate the reference picture.  I've gotten good at moving those hooks. :)

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Perhaps pictures can be deceiving. The pic above with the metal ruler makes the rivet look farther outside the 10 MM range. The pic above looks closer. Well played. ONWARD, SOLDIER!

No worries, Steve.  Parallax errors happen to the best of us.

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This is such a great build!

 

Your husband is a brilliant, and you are adorable! Such a great pair!

I don't think I've ever been called adorable before.  But, I am definitely not beyond accepting flattery.  I like you already.  Glad you are enjoying the build.  My mighty engineer is back home again and we are resuming our team build today.  

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Congratulations on your celebrity status in the March newsletter!  Looking forward to more build posts!!!

Thank you.  I was very flattered to be mentioned.  It meant a great deal.

 

For anyone who is interested, here is the PhotoBucket link with rest of the "Where in the World is TK pictures?"  My son was on winter break so we spent five days in the Philippines, with a stopover in Japan each way.  It was a good opportunity to take some interesting pictures.  I headed home to get the boy back in school, and my husband continued on to Hong Kong and China for work.  He took TK with him and got more pictures.  :smiley-sw013:  I married the right man.

 

http://s974.photobucket.com/user/dianawolftorres/library/Where%20in%20the%20world%20is%20TK91305

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So nice having my engineer at home today.  The weather was glorious and we were able to spend a sunny afternoon working both indoors and outdoors hammering out the nitty gritty final details of the build.  There's not much left to do, but it seems all these little tasks are the ones taking the longest to get done.

 

Thank you to Darth Aloha for suggesting I increase the size of the pictures in my thread.  I appreciate the feedback.

 

We added a new return edge to the bottom chest piece.

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The return edge was easy to create thanks to the "half moon" rig. The other essential components are the heat gun and a block of wood.

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For added strength, we also put little shims in where the brackets will attach.  These are the most high stress areas, and most likely where you'll get cracks.

 

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Fully reinforced chest piece

 

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Chest brackets look great except...

 

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RS didn't send us enough screws.  We're short by five screws.  We're not screwed, though, we'll just find some locally.  In the meantime, we'll work on something else.

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We moved on to the belt.  Time to attach the dropboxes.  Originally, we were going to make the dropboxes "functional."  But, there's not really much you can put in these itty bitty little boxes.  They're cute and all, but my current (rubber chemical) gloves are so clumsy I can't imagine having the dexterity to possible open those things up with my gloves on. So, we are sealing these little puppies up.  Maybe I should write a little message inside of them first.  Like a time capsule.

 

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The ends of the pieces of the elastic are frayed.  So, we hit 'em up with a bit of flame to get rid of the fraying.  This is best done outdoors.  The smoke detectors can be so annoying.

 

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We decided to attach the elastic with a rivet. IMG_4664_zpsebd20a61.jpg

 

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Sealing the boxes for all eternity.  Gah.  I didn't get to add my secret message.  Sigh.  Husband did want me to add to the build thread that you only need to put glue in the four corners of the drop boxes, and not all around.  If you put glue all the way around the rectangle and then squeeze it shut, it will come out like a PB&J sandwich.

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Time to paint the Scootch bucket.  The weather is perfect for it this weekend.

 

So, the engineer headed outside to build a rig for painting helmets.

 

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This is what he came back inside with a few minutes later.  We always have spare wood around since husband likes to build things in his spare time.

 

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This rig allows the helmet to be painted from different angles and turned.  Allows gives it a place to dry.  

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I just loved it because it made my helmet look cool.

 

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We weren't sure what kind of paint and primer to use, so we texted Kyle (my mentor) and cousin Walter (Haribon72).   I love this picture of husband out in the mancave with the Scootch bucket.   It is like the two of them are in a deep conversation about the mysteries of life.  

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I've often heard "Krylon paint" when it's about painting a helmet, but a don't know about the accuracy.

 

This thread might be interesting for you to read. I'm sure there are others but i just found this one:

http://www.whitearmor.net/forum/topic/3348-move-along-helmet/

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I've often heard "Krylon paint" when it's about painting a helmet, but a don't know about the accuracy.

 

This thread might be interesting for you to read. I'm sure there are others but i just found this one:

http://www.whitearmor.net/forum/topic/3348-move-along-helmet/

 

Thanks, Germain.  I appreciate the reference thread.  I loved the way my cousin Walter's Scootch helmet came out so I am using his build thread as a reference on this one.  

 

http://www.whitearmor.net/forum/topic/25745-tk-helmet-build-build-kit-from-scootch-by-haribon72-silicon-valleyca/?hl=+haribon72%20+scootch

 

Walter's advice to me was: "Make sure you spray light even coats.  Three coats for the primer.  Allow to dry one hour between coats, and then seven coats of the gloss white."

 

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 This is the white primer.  We found it at our local Orchard Supply.

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This is the paint we will be using.  Both designed just for plastic.

Edited by AsBlondeAsLuke
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