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Scalawag

Doopy Doos E-11 with BlastFX electronics. (complete build)

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Hi all,

 

I'm Paul, I have been a member here for a while, but this is the first time I think I have contributed.

 

Firstly I would like to say that the intention of this build is not to make a hyper realistic E-11 blaster, and I am aware more can be done in terms of detailing than I have done here to make a more accurate representation of an E-11.  My goal was to make a reasonably accurate looking ANH E-11 which had the added benefit of an electronic light and sound system.

 

Here is a video of the completed build which I did to talk about the build and demonstrate the electronics.

 

 

 

 

I will start with a list of all the parts I have used and where they can be purchased.

 

Doopy Doos Resin E-11 kit

https://www.doopydoos.com/stormtrooper-e-11-complete-anh-e-11-blaster-kit-offer-2685-p.asp

 

BlastFX electronic effects board & Mini Scope Display from TRamp.

https://www.facebook.com/trooperamp/

 

Hegstler Counter box, Trigger assembly, Charging port assembly, & barrel LED mount from Lee McCormack - Shadow Defense Systems on Shapeways.

https://www.shapeways.com/shops/shadow-defense-systems

 

Power Cylinders from CSB Props on Shapeways.

https://www.shapeways.com/product/ERH6MCTSC/power-cell-assembly-7-with-2-resistors?optionId=59449027&li=marketplace

 

Hollow 1943 M38 scope kit from Bulldog Props.

https://www.facebook.com/BulldogPropsJapan/

 

Various parts from Tino’s E-11 finishing kit including the scope rail and counter bracket.

 

 

USB charging board.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/TP4056-5V-1A-Micro-USB-18650-Lithium-Battery-Charging-Board-Quality-1-2-5-10pc/163005239011?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

 

1000mAh Lithium Polymer battery.

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Conrad-Energy-Lithium-Polymer-Battery-3-7V-1000mAh-10C-with-BEC-Connector/122527159108?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

 

Black PVC tube, clear acrylic tube, & rare earth magnets.

All purchased fro eBay.

 

The only glue used throughout the build is Zap-A-Gap CA+ which I purchase from Amazon and Miliput was used as filler which can also be bought from Amazon.

 

Spray paints are from Halfords, Clear coat and detailing paints are all Tamiya acrylics and Revell Aqua color, and the weathering washes are from the Mig range of model making products.

 

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My starting point for this build was the scope and mini scope display.

I built the scope kit as per the instructions which come with the kit.  I then drilled a 3mm hole in the underside of the scope just behind the front leg.  The power cables for the mini scope display were then threaded trough this hole and the electronics boards slid into the body of the scope.  I then used clear tape to secure the display to the red lens of the display kit, ensuring that the tape extended up the sides of the lens and making sure the display was centred on the lens.  This was slid into the rear of the scope where the retaining ring inside the scope then presses against the tape securing everything in place.  The clear lens from the kit the goes in on top of this and the scope lens retaining ring is screwed in to secure the whole assembly in place, making sure that the display is oriented correctly to the scope.

 

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Next I prepared the parts of the resin blaster kit.  The counter box, scope, trigger and power cylinders from the kit were discarded as the would be replaced with alternative parts.  The rest had any casting flashing removed, generally cleaned up and washed in soapy water.

next I cut a hole in the receiver tube behind were the mag well casting will eventually be fitted.  I marked the position of the mag well on the receiver and then marked out an area inside of this which still allowed for the mag well to be glued in place.  the corners of the smaller area were then drilled out, and a Dremel with a router bit was used to create the opening.  The receiver is actually quite thick as it has a PVC strengthening tube inside of the resin casting.

 

I moved on to the trigger assembly next.  A hole was created in the resin trigger group casting by drilling and routing with a Dremel once again.  This hole houses the 3D printed trigger assembly, and needs to be snug, but not so tight as to restrict the trigger movement in any way.  The trigger assembly was built up incorporating the trigger switch from the BlastFX unit.  I opted at this point to cut the wires for the trigger switch in order to feed them through a small hole in the receiver, rather than having to make a larger hole to fit the switch itself through, which may need filling after assembly.  I also fitted a small coil spring ( a cut down ball point pen spring) between the back of the trigger itself and the resin trigger group.  This spring returns the trigger after it has been depressed.

A hole was routed out in the back of the trigger group above the pistol grip where the rumble generator was fitted.  Similarly the wires for the rumble generator were cut to accommodate easier wiring later on.  Two 3mm holes were drill in the receiver for the 2 sets of wires to pass through, and then the trigger group was glued and screwed into place using Zap-A-Gap and self tapping screws.  I chose the method of fixing as I want a very strong bond between the trigger group and receiver.

 

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The scope assembly was then fitted to the rail and counter bracket.  The holes in the rail and counter bracket needed drilling out to take the screws which come with the scope.  I ended up gluing these screws in place as the resin the scope is made from is quite soft, and I did not feel that the screws would hold for any length of time just by screwing them in.

This assembly was then attached to the receiver in order to ascertain where the counter bracket would sit in order to place a 6mm hole behind it which would allow wiring access between the counter and the receiver.

 

The scope and bracket were then removed and the front half of the counter was fixed to the bracket with some self tapping screws.  A further 6mm hole was drilled through the bracket and counter to give access to the counter.

 

I then cut a piece of 22mm diameter 3mm walled clear acrylic tube to length and slid it into the receiver until it sat where the barrel would normally be.  The 3D printed LED end cap was assembled and the unit was then placed through the hole at the mag well, and placed over the end of the acrylic tube.  The wires for the LED were once again cut to allow them to be routed back to the counter box.

 

A length of 20mm black PVC tube was cut to fit inside the receiver to cover the charging handle slot so that the wiring in the receiver cannot be seen.  This needs cutouts at each end to allow space for the wiring hole behind the counter bracket, and the charging board which sits at the end of the receiver behind the end cap.

 

The Charging board and on/off/charge switch were assembled, and leads soldered on to reach back to the mag well opening.

The main BlastFX board, display panel, speaker and selector switch where then all fitted into the 2 halves of the counter box, with the trigger, rumble unit and flash unit wires all fed out through the previously drilled 6mm hole.  This hegstler box 3D print is a godsend if you are using the BlastFX system because it has been designed specifically for the components to all fit in.  It has a cut out for the screen, a grill and mounting pegs for the speaker, and an assembly which creates the working reset switch, brilliant!!!  As it is made for the BlastFX system though, it does have a 'BlastFX' logo where the Hengstler Eagle logo should be, so if that is important for you you may need to find a work around or alternative part.  

The corresponding ends of the cut leads were fed through the receiver and out of the 6mm hole behind the counter bracket.  The cable ends were then rejoined by soldering them and heat shrink was used to cover them.

Next the power lead from the main board was fed out of the back of the counter, and along with the power lead from the scope fed through the 6mm hole in the receiver and along to the mag well opening, where they were soldered to the appropriate leads from the battery connector and the charger/on/off switch.

At this point the battery was attached and correct function of all the components confirmed, before the charger/switch assembly was glued into the back end of the receiver and all remaining cabling were fitted back into the receiver.

I then effectively had a functioning blaster, except that the speaker was not working for some reason at this point.  This was resolved shortly afterwards.

 

 

The rest of the resin detail parts were then added.  I also replaced the 2 screws at the muzzle with real metal knurled hex bolts.  I also replaced the hex bolt in the end of the pistol grip with a real bolt too.  Several other hex screws were used to replace resin cast parts.  The end cap was fitted, and a section of foam was added inside.  This foam pushes agains the end of the receiver and provides enough tension to hold the end cap securely in place so that it does not rattle around.

The mag well and mag were hollowed out to allow the battery to sit inside.  The mag well was then glued in place, and rare earth magnets were recessed into both the mag well and mag to keep the two together when the mag was inserted.

 

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The blaster was now ready for masking prior to paint.  All parts to remain free from paint including the holes in the receiver which the clear tube can be seen through were masked off using masking tape and Blu Tak.  The battery was removed.  The front end of the scope was also removed to protect the front lens and preserve the metal finish of the screws which hold it in place.

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The blaster received 2 coats of Halfords grey plastic primer, which was allowed to cure for 24hrs.  Then 2 coats of Halfords satin black were applied as a base colour.

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Once the black paint was touch dry I also added various bits of detail paint in Tamiya XF-16 flat aluminium, and X-31 titan gold. I also touched in any light spots in the black paint with Tamiya X-18 semi gloss black.
I used a white wax crayon to highlight the lettering on the back of the scope.

I also replaced all the parts I removed for painting, and unmasked enough to check that all the functions still work as they should (and they did this time).

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Next the blaster was dry brushed with the silver and the scope dry brushed with gold. This is to simulate ware and tear in the paint and finish on the gun. It is done by loading a small amount of paint onto an old paint brush (I find old and worn out ones work the best the more rough looking the better). Then most of the paint is brushed off. I use a folded piece of kitchen towel and just rub the brush on it until almost all the paint is gone, and the brush looks dry, hence dry brushing. Then just brush over the blaster and this will leave what little paint is left on any raised edges, corners and high spots which is generally where ware and tear occurs.

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Once the dry brushing has had enough time to dry, a wash of Mig ‘dark brown for green vehicles’ enamel wash was applied over the top of the dry brush weathering. This gives the blaster a more dirty look, and blends and softens the dry brushing a bit.
When dry, this was then all sealed with a coat of Tamiya TS-80 flat clear. The clear coat seals in the weathering and gives the blaster a uniform finish.

The final stages were to remove all the masking, and then hand paint areas inside the vent holes in the receiver which had missed paint due to the masking. I painted these is Revel Aqua Colour 08 black matt. The front of the hengstler box was given a very light brush coat of Tamiya x-18 semi gloss black, and the rear of the box was dry brushed in the same colour to try and give the look of the plastics used in the counters covers. There was then some very light dry brushing of the silver and gold paints again on areas where high levels of ware may occur just to bring out some of the highlights that had been dulled back by the earlier wash.

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And that completed the build.

 

I would like to say a massive thanks to Paul Whitrow over at TRamp for his advice and encouragement, to Lee McCormack at Shadow Defence Systems for his excellent 3D printed parts which are superbly designed to just work with BlastFX, To Brian at BullDog Props for hid brilliant M38 scope kit and the advice on getting the right one for my needs, and to Tino for his fantastic detailing parts kit and scope rail.  You all made this build a lot easier to pull off Guys thank you.

 

Thanks for taking the time to read through this long post, I hope you enjoyed it.

 

Paul

Edited by Scalawag
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Great work, Paul. Glad you posted it here as well as the FB pages.
Lovely use of Brian’s scope and Paul’s electronics. Looks like a brilliant blaster :-)

Dan

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1 hour ago, CableGuy said:

Great work, Paul. Glad you posted it here as well as the FB pages. emoji1303.png
Lovely use of Brian’s scope and Paul’s electronics. Looks like a brilliant blaster :-)

Dan

Thanks Dan, yeah I decided to give it a try.

 

Paul

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Hi there Paul,

 

Great to see your complete progress with ample description here on FISD - I did come across your fb posts being a member of the BlastFX builders fb group myself. I'm glad you have Brian's scope - must be such a treat to marvel at the workings of the BlastFX scope component inside this scope! I will make due with a hollowed doopydoos version with Tino's completion set add-ons myself when I get to that stage...

 

...I will prepare a cup of coffee ahead of time before studying your posts - thanks for the thoroughness!!

 

cheers!

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5 hours ago, Dracotrooper said:

Hi there Paul,

 

Great to see your complete progress with ample description here on FISD - I did come across your fb posts being a member of the BlastFX builders fb group myself. I'm glad you have Brian's scope - must be such a treat to marvel at the workings of the BlastFX scope component inside this scope! I will make due with a hollowed doopydoos version with Tino's completion set add-ons myself when I get to that stage...

 

...I will prepare a cup of coffee ahead of time before studying your posts - thanks for the thoroughness!!

 

cheers!

I’m glad you found this useful and I hope that some of the ideas from the build are indeed useful when you come to do your own. Brian’s scopes are brilliant, and do lift the build. They are very reasonably priced too for the level of detail you get with them. Enjoy your own build as much as I enjoyed this one, and just ask if I can help with anything. 

 

Paul

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Wow Paul! What a work of art. Without any doubt, this is a very special blaster.

17 hours ago, Scalawag said:

Firstly I would like to say that the intention of this build is not to make a hyper realistic E-11 blaster, and I am aware more can be done in terms of detailing than I have done here to make a more accurate representation of an E-11.  My goal was to make a reasonably accurate looking ANH E-11 which had the added benefit of an electronic light and sound system.

Mission absolutely accomplished. :salute: 

Many builders (including me) spent much time in the recreation of fine details. During trooping, they are simply overlooked, as there is so much more to see...

With this build, you focussed on the right kind of detail, because 2 displays, the sound and the LEDs in the barrel are hard to overlook. Once you start trooping, I guess many people will be fascinated by your blaster.

 

Gotta go now. Feeling the need to build a new E-11 again...  ;)

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5 hours ago, T-Jay said:

Wow Paul! What a work of art. Without any doubt, this is a very special blaster.

Mission absolutely accomplished. :salute: 

Many builders (including me) spent much time in the recreation of fine details. During trooping, they are simply overlooked, as there is so much more to see...

With this build, you focussed on the right kind of detail, because 2 displays, the sound and the LEDs in the barrel are hard to overlook. Once you start trooping, I guess many people will be fascinated by your blaster.

 

Gotta go now. Feeling the need to build a new E-11 again...  ;)

Thank you T-Jay, I really do appreciate the feed back, and it means a lot coming from you my friend.

That was my thinking exactly regarding the detailing, just enough to look right.  I think that even when you are just holding the blaster or have it holstered on a troop a good deal of the detail is hidden.  

If this was to be a 'wall hanger' where people could walk up to it and take in all the detail then yes I think it would be worth it.  That said I will be hanging this on the wall I think but just as a way of storing it when its at home.

I am sure that most people at troops will be more enthralled by the pew pew sound and light show this can put on than any amount of fine detail i might have put into it could inspire.... and kids will love it too I'm sure.

 

Paul

Edited by Scalawag
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Just been having a play about with this, and discovered that this is the pattern projected on a wall from the flash when in stun mode.

 

 

Reminds me of something?????

 

:0Lighten:

 

WvbAWR8.jpg

 

I think this is very cool.;)

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I always find blaster electronics lots of fun. Beautiful piece of work, I've thought of including some in my build, but really think I do have enough scratchbuilding it from zero.
Nice work.

Enviado desde mi SM-G360F mediante Tapatalk

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29 minutes ago, Aunion said:

I always find blaster electronics lots of fun. Beautiful piece of work, I've thought of including some in my build, but really think I do have enough scratchbuilding it from zero.
Nice work.

Enviado desde mi SM-G360F mediante Tapatalk
 

Thanks Aunion, I'm glad you like what I have done here.

 

Of course another way of looking at it is that a scratch build is the perfect opportunity to include electronics as you can build parts around what is required to fit the electronics in.  In some ways that would be much easier than adapting a kit.;)

 

All the best with your build

 

Paul

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So I was looking for a way to display my new E-11 blaster when not using it, and as I mentioned a couple of posts back I was thinking of wall mounting it.  Eventually I found these bathrobe pegs on Amazon.
 
 
'Ello, I thought, they would work well for wall hanging, and so I ordered a set which arrived today.
 
As they are a set of 6 pegs, I thought it would be rude not to invite some of my other blasters to the party as well.
 
Top: SDS E-11
Middle: ProCoPrint3D F11D
Bottom: Doopy Doos E-11 with BlastFX
 
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Paul

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Thanks Aunion, I'm glad you like what I have done here.
 
Of course another way of looking at it is that a scratch build is the perfect opportunity to include electronics as you can build parts around what is required to fit the electronics in.  In some ways that would be much easier than adapting a kit.
 
All the best with your build
 
Paul
Thanks for your kind words. Maybe I may add electronics in a future build, let's name my actual project Aunion 1.0/#1/Mk1 by the time being, if I get enough funds and wife permission we'll probably see Aunion 2.0/#2/Mk2.
Cheers.

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25 minutes ago, Aunion said:

Thanks for your kind words. Maybe I may add electronics in a future build, let's name my actual project Aunion 1.0/#1/Mk1 by the time being, if I get enough funds and wife permission we'll probably see Aunion 2.0/#2/Mk2.
Cheers.

Enviado desde mi SM-G360F mediante Tapatalk
 

That sounds like a plan Aunion:duim:

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That sounds like a plan Aunion:duim:
LOL
Wish it would depend on me...
Damn budget

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A very minor update.

 

I did some more reading up on the Hengstler 400 counter boxes that were used on E-11s in ANH.  

 

I gather the ones with the 'eagle' logo predate WWII as the Hengstler company changed the Eagle logo in the late 1930's to avoid any association with the Nazi party. 

Interesting stuff, but anyway, the front end of these seems to have been made of some kind of high grade cast white metal, with most being plated in cadmium which gives them that sort of brass like finish we often see in pictures of vintage counters.  The cadmium was there to prevent oxidisation I think.  

 

The rear cover of the boxes are usually a light grey coloured hard plastic of some kind. 

 

The prop department for ANH painted them black for the film, and so I have tried to represent these original finishes in places like corners where the prop departments paint may have worn off.

 

The front of the box has been dry brushed on corners and edges with Tamiya X-31 Titan Gold to try and replicate glimpses of the cadmium plating.  It has come out more a silver colour in the pics I have taken though so you will have to take my word for it that it is a more brass sort of colour in reality.

The back cover was similarly dry brushed on the corners and edges where paint may get rubbed off, this time using Tamiya XF-19 Sky Grey to represent the original light grey plastic used.

 

The last detail addition is the 2 electrical connections at the front of the box.  These I gather are not seen on all Hengstler 400 counters and they are I believe a removable part.  The connectors seen here have been fabricated from plasticard, painted with Tamiya XF-16 Flat Aluminium, and then given a dark enamel wash to tone them into the rest of the paintwork.

I am not sure if I actually like these yet or not, and so they are not fixed in place, but have enough friction to hold them in place anyway.

 

CdqZq1n.jpg

 

Paul

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Great work Paul!

Another nice E11 with electronics :-)!


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59 minutes ago, Mupfel said:

Great work Paul!

Another nice E11 with electronics emoji106.png:-)!


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thank you Mupfel, I am glad you like it.

 

Paul

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