Jump to content
Thrawn's guard

Thrawns Guard's ANH E11 blaster build

Recommended Posts

With both screws being correct I like the looks of all slotted screws.

That was my thoughts also Mike........Luckily I have not glued them in to position yet  :)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the end cap I decided to try to replicate the detail provided in the link above i.e. by recessing the D-ring holder in to the end cap but also providing the recess detail.

 

 

Firstly I marked out the position of the D ring holder on the end cap. 

 

259%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%201_zpsz3m

 

 

Taking some green stuff I then reinforced the inside of the end cap local to where I was rebating the opposite face.

 

260%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%202_zpsbu5

 

I began by carefully creating a rebate in the end cap with a Dremel for the D-Ring holder to fit in to. 

 

261%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%202_zpsgzv

         

 

Once I had got to the correct depth I test fitted the D-Rind holder with the D-Ring installed to ensure all fit ok.

 

 

262%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%203_zpsoq4

 

Taking more green stuff I filled in the perimeter of the recess in green stuff before using a plastic lid with an inside diameter the same diameter as that of the holder in order to carve out a circular profile.

 

263%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%204_zpshtm

 

264%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%205_zps2ke

 

This then created a neat circular wall to the outside of the recess.

 

 

265%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%206_zpsior

 

The green stuff that was forced inside the plastic cap when it was pushed in to position was then carefully removed. Once the green stuff had partially cured I test fit the holder to ensure that everything still fit correct.

 

266%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%207_zpsnos

 

I then allowed the green stuff to fully cure before sanding the green stuff flush with the end cap.

 

267%20-%20End%20cap%20upgrade%208_zps78u

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I decided that I wasn’t overly happy with the selector switch modification. It was one of the first modifications that I had done and I had fixed the selector switch using a screw with the head removed.

 

My concern was that over time the thread in the screw would wear away the inside of the selector switch and in time would come loose and break or fall off therefore I decided to carry out an improved modification.

 

I purchased an inexpensive 2.5mm stereo plug and socket and removed the rear plastic cover (This simply unscrewed from both).

 

268%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%201

 

269%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%202

 

I then cut off the connections using a cutting disk on a Dremel as I wanted to make both parts as small as possible and I didn't need the electrical connections anyway.

 

270%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%203

 

Taking an engraving bit fitted to the Dremel I slowly and carefully opened up the base of the switch so that I could glue in the plug. This took some trial and error but I got there I the end.

 

I then removed the screw from the trigger housing and opened the small hole up using drill bits so that it was as deep and wide as the socket (I carefully measured both the depth and diameter of the socket using a digital calliper). Again this was a time consuming process as I wanted to achieve a tight and neat fit but again I got there in the end.

 

272%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%205

 

271%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%204

 

I test fit the socket in to the trigger housing before gluing.

 

273%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%206

 

This is what I ended up with once it was all put together. I’m pretty pleased with the result and the selector switch works very smoothly.

 

274%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%207

 

275%20-%20Seector%20switch%20upgrade%208

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It looks like my Doopydoos folding stock needs some work tidying it up.

 

If anyone is able to post photos of the views shown below on the folding stock it would be much appreciated.

 

IMG_1001_zpsol5qawm7.jpg

 

IMG_1002_zpsgyzddeeo.jpg

 

IMG_1003_zpshidzvczn.jpg

 

IMG_1004_zpsngenydai.jpg

 

IMG_1005_zpscmn5k6hv.jpg

 

IMG_1006_zpsb7fk07a8.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Chris, have you looked through the photo gallery in the E-11 Reference?

There are a bunch of detail pictures in the gallery showing things you don't commonly see on a typical Sterling disassembly...
I think lots of people glossed right over the link to the gallery. It's shadowed by the cool videos above it!

 

Here's a link:

Sterling Photo Gallery

Edited by usaeatt2
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nice work on the selector switch and the end cap lock. I used the stereo jacks for other connecting parts as well such as the charging handle, stock , and the magazine release. They hold up well and no worries of falling out or wear from turning.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the link Aaron.

I had seen these before but to be honest had forgotten about them.

They show dome really great details.

Edited by Thrawn's guard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm glad that you like the mods Brian.

I'm now starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel....apart from the painting.

Edited by Thrawn's guard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It’s just a short update this evening as I have been very busy at work this week (First week back after the holidays).

 

I finally managed to get hold of the transparent over head projector sheets and printed off a set of my preferred cross hairs.

 

283%20-%20Scope%201_zpsmkpsrah0.jpg

 

I then carefully cut out one of the cross hairs ready to be stuck on to the narrow, rear, end of the scope front lens housing.

 

284%20-%20Scope%202_zpsm11fvczt.jpg

 

285%20-%20Scope%203_zps9lsfkavs.jpg

 

I was using superglue applied to the narrow end of the front lens housing to glue the circular cross hairs however I noticed that after a few attempt the glue vapour condenses on the transparent sheet leaving unsightly obscure marks (It was a good idea that I opted to print a few copies of the decal).

 

286%20-%20Scope%204_zps2scytqyb.jpg

 

Therefore I decided that because the transparent cross hair decals were so light PVA glue would be easily strong enough and wouldn't produce the glue vapour issue. This is what the cross hairs look like installed on the rear of the front lens housing.

 

287%20-%20Scope%205_zps2p7fy36i.jpg

 

This is what the view looks like through the scope.

 

288%20-%20Scope%206_zpscquic7xe.jpg

 

Tomorrow I will finish the scope by gluing to front section on to the rest of the scope, filling that gap with green stuff and painting.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I check something with the E11 experts out there.

I am starting to look at the inner bolts and have located it as shown in the photo below.

 

289%20-%20Inner%20bolt%201_zpsamvz5tvu.j

 

This seems to tie in with the picture below from the FISD E11 Reference Team thread however I have also seen it in slightly different locations.

 

BLASTER%20RIGHT%20Blueprint%201024_zps0h

Edited by Thrawn's guard

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I managed to get a reasonable;e amount of work done on the internal bolt today so should hopefully be able to post some progress pictures over the weekend.

 

The scope also needs completing (join the front section to the rest of the scope, fill in the gap and paint).

 

I did however have a bit if a nightmare in that I bumped the trigger on the edge of the desk and managed to break it  :(  I guess that this presents me with an opportunity to try out an alternative trigger mechanism once I have repaired or replaced the trigger itself so maybe every cloud has a silver lining it's just really annoying.

Edited by Thrawn's guard
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at how the folding stock connects to the underside of the front of the receiver I decided to try my hand at replicating this detail.

 

Firstly I connected the receiver to both sides of the bracket connection and then located a flat headed nail with a 3mm diameter shank. The flat head of the nail was then slotted in between the receiver and the inner barrel.

 

290%20-%20Folding%20stock%20fixing%201_z

 

To ensure that I drilled the hole in the folding stock in the correct position I applied a little nail varnish to the tip of the nail and rotated the folding stock down on to the top of the nail. The nail varnish then leaves a mark on the folding stock where the hole needs to be drilled.

 

291%20-%20Folding%20stock%20fixing%202_z

 

292%20-%20Folding%20stock%20fixing%203_z

 

The folding stock was then removed from the receiver and a 3mm diameter hole carefully drilled in the stock. A little glue was placed in to the hole and the nail pushed partly in to the hole. The folding stock was the slid in to position under the receiver and then screwed in to both side of the bracket.

 

294%20-%20Folding%20stock%20fixing%204_z

 

Finally the folding stock was pushed up to the underside of the stock.

 

295%20-%20Folding%20stock%20fixing%205_z

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at the inner bolt mechanism after some consideration I have decided to install an inner barrel to the front of the receiver and an independent inner bolt. This is a minor detail but I wanted the separate them so that the front barrel didn’t move when the inner bolt mechanism is operated.

 

Using the plastic pipe with an outside diameter of 20mm provided in Tino’s completion set there is sufficient length provided to achieve this.

 

The other parts I am using for this modification are a chunky marker pen with an outside diameter of 16mm, the steel wire provided in Tino’s Completion set, a 37mm, (almost 1 ½ inch), long 3.9mm diameter mechanical screw and a M16 i.e. 16mm diameter steel bolt (though one of the chunky marking pens would also be an alternative option). You can see in the photo below the spring steel used. This is what I had remaining after I had built the spring).

 

296%20-%20Inner%20bolt%201_zpsatk4rdoh.j

 

I cut a 120mm, (4 ¾ inch), long section of the plastic pipe and pushed the marker pen inside the pipe so that it projected out of one end by 22mm.

 

297%20-%20Inner%20bolt%202_zpstlpufqtg.j

 

Taking the steel wire I wrapped it around the steel bolt and then stretched it to the required length in order to make a spring (My aim was to get 11 visible coils along the charging handle slot).

 

298%20-%20Inner%20bolt%203_zpsd8rpmen8.j

 

I formed a spring 150mm long (5 ½ inches) and then placed this on the end of the projecting part of the marker. At this stage I would recommend that you do not cut the rest of the wire off until you are happy that the spring is the correct length.

 

299%20-%20Inner%20bolt%204_zpsdlcnajfh.j

 

The plastic pipe complete with the marker pen and spring can then be pushed in to the rear of the receiver so that the rear of the inner bolt is located as shown in my earlier post. I lightly marked these positions on the receiver in pencil.

 

300%20-%20Inner%20bolt%205_zpsb8kfe3yj.j

 

Once the inner bolt is in the correct position I marked the inner bolt at the end of the slot near the ejector port (with a small amount of nail varnish). This is where the charging handle needs to be installed later. Note that you should leave a small gap say 2mm between the end of the charging slot and the handle as shown in my later pictures).

 

301%20-%20Inner%20bolt%206_zpsb5wxzmgx.j

 

A 3mm diameter hole was then drilled in to the base of the charging handle and the mechanical screw installed using a spot of glue. This both reinforces the charging handle itself but also then allows you to fix the charging handle to the inner bolt.

 

302%20-%20Inner%20bolt%207_zpsyy1n0l73.j

 

I then removed the interior of the marker pen i.e. ink membrane, don’t do this in the house as it is quite messy, and drilled a 3mm diameter hole through both walls of the plastic pipe starting where I had marked the bolt when it was in position within the receiver. I then test fit the charging handle by screwing it in to the pipe so that it was just flush with he opposite outer wall of the plastic pipe.

 

303%20-%20Inner%20bolt%208_zpslmev60ts.j

 

The assembly as a whole is then installed as follows: -

 

1)      Place the spring on the end of the marker.

2)      Push the plastic pipe in to the receiver so that the hole for the charging handle is located at the large opening in the charging handle slot.

3)      Screw the charging handle in to the hole checking regularly that the bolt can slide in the receiver. Make sure you get the charging handle facing in the correct direction.

4)      Push the inner bolt in to position.

 

304%20-%20Inner%20bolt%209_zps3adqmhan.j

 

305%20-%20Inner%20bolt%2010_zps7bwbjgof.

 

306%20-%20Inner%20bolt%2011_zpsg1qzymqb.

 

I still have to add the cleaning strip and paint the but the mechanism seems to work fine.

Edited by Thrawn's guard
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Moving on to the ejector I carefully marked out in pencil the positions of the visible details after referring to various reference pictures.

 

307%20-%20Ejector%201_zpsnnfofa53.jpg

 

The slot in the ejector port is 5mm wide therefore I look at 5mm wood drill bit and formed the curved end to the slot. The remainder of the slot was then opened up using a Dremel with various engraving and grinding bits.

 

308%20-%20Ejector%202_zpsjmspftdj.jpg

 

309%20-%20Ejector%203_zpsq5bmyr3r.jpg

 

I wanted to replicate as close as I could the 2 metal details within the slot. The first is a metallic cylinder approximately 5mm diameter. I actually used the central axle that I removed from the counter as shown on the first page of this thread. I marked out the required length and then cut it to size using a cutting disk on the Dremel.

 

310%20-%20Ejector%204_zpsamsickdc.jpg

 

Next I moved on to the second detail within the slot. There are 2 versions that I have seen for this detail the more common rectangular steel detail and the version with the slot in it. Though the slotted detail iss much rarer on Sterlings I decided that I preferred its appearance so set my sights on replicating this type.

 

Below are my very rough sketches of how I was thinking of making it. Basically it boiled down to cutting two 11mm x 4.5mm rectangles of metal, cutting a slot in one of them and then sticking the slotted one on top of the other. The leftovers of the ruler I used to make my scoep rails was used for this however the aluminium strip in Tino's Completion set would work equally well.

 

311%20-%20Ejector%205_zpsomhgais8.jpg

 

312%20-%20Ejector%206_zpsyqrqa9st.jpg

 

313%20-%20Ejector%207_zpsy72ccbg9.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My next task was to identify a suitably thin sheet of metal which could ‘easily’ be cut and shaped. After trying a couple of tings that proved too stiff to bend to shape a friend at work, (Yes that’s you Gavin), suggested one of these.

 

314%20-Ejector%208_zpsyfti8pbw.jpg

 

I cut a section of wall with some inexpensive tin snipers and marked out a strip 6mm wide using a steel ruler and a sharp knife to etch the cut line.

 

315%20-%20Ejector%209_zpsesaclefz.jpg

 

316%20-%20Ejector%2010_zpscex6jigi.jpg

 

I then checked to ensure the width was correct once cut. 

 

317%20-%20Ejector%2011_zpstfhjjtiz.jpg

 

I had previously marked out where the clearing strip was to be located on the ejector and made a paper template. This template was then used to cut the 6mm wide strip to shape.

 

318%20-%20Ejector%2012_zpsbl895i5i.jpg

 

I placed the 2 metal details in to the strip in the ejector and test fitted the clearing strip.

 

For some added realism I rubbed the clearing strip on some fine sandpaper in the direction that the strip travels within the receiver to give a hint of wear which you may be able to just about make out in the photograph.

 

The thin was also pushed under the lip I made around the perimeter of the ejector to add a little more realism.

 

319%20-%20Ejector%2013_zpsgewqxde3.jpg

 

320%20-%20Ejector%2014_zpsdaj7spjs.jpg

 

Lastly I repeated the above process to add a section of clearing strip to the inner bolt.

 

321%20-%20Ejector%2015_zpsfbwlf2da.jpg

 

322%20-%20Ejector%2016_zps3lfvq2ci.jpg

 

More updates to hopefully follow later.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chris I think your ejector section it too long I think the measurement was to the end of the bolt. Part of the bolt would be forward of where you are looking. <br><br>

I could be wrong as I am only going by pictures. <br><br>

I really like the way you built this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Chris. Going great! I think what Mike is trying to say is, well if we look at the two pics below

 

med_gallery_12157_40_34430_zpsmtmj4plk.j

320%20-%20Ejector%2014_zps8ik43so4.jpg

 

You can see that where the extractor plunger ends on the original is about vertical to the extractor guard (about the bottom of the curve), whereas your extends quite a bit further back. You have probably made your extractor the proper size, but half of it is sitting within the receiver tube, forward of the opening. That probably does;t make any more sense, does it??

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mike/Ian - I see what you mean now so thanks for spotting this and letting me know, Sometimes you can get a little too close to your own projects to notice details such as this.

It's better to catch it now than once painted so I will make the necessary alterations.

Edited by Thrawn's guard
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ian thanks for explaining it better.  

 

Chris you might be able to carve out a spot so you can slide the extractor underneath the receiver.  This would give the appearance of it continuing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

302%20-%20Inner%20bolt%207_zpsyy1n0l73.j

 

Glad to see you took the red marker pen to make sure your blaster will fire red shots some day ;)

 

Love how familiar this picture looks to me - but I used the green marker pen :o     :laugh1: 

 

Keep the good work up and don't worry about the upcoming paint work. Many of us feared that stage, but once started it turned into fun...

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...