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OddViking327

501st Stormtrooper[TK]
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About OddViking327

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    Sergeant

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  • Name
    Colin
  • 501st ID
    25622
  • 501st Unit
    Golden Gate Garrison

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  1. Okay, @T-Jay, I think I figured it out. Moving the scope is possible, but tricky. As it is built, all of the bolts thread into the parts, securing them really well together. As it is assembled, you bolt the back two scope parts (glued to each other and I Bondo-filled and smoothed the gaps) to the scope rail, then you bolt the rail down, and then glue the front piece of the scope in to cover that rail bolt so it is hidden by the scope. To move the scope, I would need to break the glue on the front piece (not easy, but probably doable), in order to remove that bolt on the rail, the two bolts that go through that rail and the L-brackets to hold on the counter, and the one at the back that holds it to the rear sight. Then I can remove the scope bolts, and drill new holes for them, and touch up the glued area with spray paint. The problem arises when I move it, if the scope were re-mounted, there would be no way to bolt the Hengstler counter bolts that are under the scope. I figured, I can instead, thread the bolt into the rail from below, but drill the scope bolt holes bigger than the bolt's total diameter, and not put the scope on those bolts at first. Then, bolt the rail down, the Hengstler counter brackets, and then, use CA glue to fill the bolt holes in the scope, and slide it down onto the bolts, and glue the front scope piece down again which should secure it in place. This would be fairly permanent.
  2. @T-Jay Thanks. I am not able to move it, as it had pre-set holes, and then the front of the scope gets glued on to cover another bolt mount, so it can no longer be moved without some collateral damage. I just looked at a bunch of original E-11s, and you are totally right about the location, I will pass that fix on to the maker as well. What do people think about that scope location, as far as Centurion approval (which is my goal with the armor)? What about the keyhole on the side?
  3. @gmrhodes13 Yeah, I didn't weather those, as well as the "counter" piece of the Hengstler counter, it had plastic housing too.
  4. Blaster continued to completion: I have made more progress on the blaster, and just completed it. Some things need to be glued, like the T-tracks and other smaller details, but some of the stronger connections are different. The kit uses M3 and M4 allen fasteners in many places (similar to the muzzle ones) that make it feel much more secure. There are also lots of nice design features, where if you assemble it in the correct order, there are holes to aid in assembly. Things like the grip (which has a rubber band for the trigger that I thought would eventually wear out but be glued in a way to be inaccessible) actually all sort of lock together, and once the bolts secure it to the upper body keep it all closed but it can be removed later: Other modifications: On the counter, I painted the raised numbers white (sort of dry brushed the high points), and added my window with a minimal amount of E6000 (do not use CA glue on any clear lenses, as it usually fogs them in a permanent way). It gets bolted on as well.: The folding stock all went together well, and while it is a little floppy on the long side arms (which I may later reinforce with a strip of aluminum or stainless steel on the backside), when it is closed up, it looks really good. The one issue was I couldn't get the rod to "clip" to the protrusion below the muzzle. It just didn't fit quite right which may have been the finishing and paint, or a slight alignment issue. The last thing I wanted was for it to detach when I was holding it, so as a failsafe I drilled out the rod recess, and added a small flat magnet. I screwed in two very tine steel screws to the muzzle protrusion (painted black after this), and now it is held firm by the magnets: The spring was fairly brightly coated, and it was distracting, so I gave it a quick brushing of black acrylic to make it look more like the blaster props. The spring is still quite strong, and sliding back the bolt all the way would be challenging, but I can slide it back an inch or so and let it snap closed with a satisfying sound that shouldn't break the blaster: So I got it all assembled, and painted the remaining screws, and it was complete and new looking: But... I wanted a minimal amount of weathering. I know many can get carried away, and I have a few other costumes where I had to walk it back, and paint it back to black in a lot of spots because it was too weathered. So I hit it in a few spots that would get abrasion going in and out of the holster (muzzle, flash guards, scope, folding stock, front sight, butt cap, and a few other spots. None on the handle or the t-tracks or the back part of the counter, and gold on the scope and the front part of the counter. I love how it turned out: Some of the features of this kit, the sliding bolt, the folding stock, and the removable magazine (held in with magnets, though I had to add a thin flat rectangle of plastic in the magazine slot to keep it from rattling, and to keep the fit more snug): So it is complete. Total time over a few weeks was about 14 hours. My review of the Imperial Arms 3D E-11 Blaster (Version 3) kit: Pros: It turned out looking really good. Most parts that should move do move (like the butt cap strap holder). A lot of care and attention has been put into the model so that it assembles really well and in some clever ways, and lines up everywhere. The print lines are very fine, so it needs less finishing work than some other models, but still, in my mind for a blaster to work best, it needs to be so smooth that no lines are visible, so it still needs that high level of finishing work. Many bolts are actual bolts, I only drilled out and replaced ones on the scope, the side of the handle, and on the Hengstler. Some pieces are engineered to be stronger, like the front sight and the front muzzle, by going through slots to the barrel for additional strength. The maker Imperial Arms 3D is usually fairly responsive over Instagram Chat, and on previous builds as well as this one, he plans to update the future kits based on feedback. He already is planning to take out the left side muzzle flash guard and to model and add the bayonet lug. Cons: While I love the folding stock and that care was made to make it look like the thickness of the original, the side strips are pretty floppy as a 3D print. I don't think any trooper actually uses the folding stock, so it isn't an issue with trooping, but I feel like that piece is likely to fail at some point if my kit were to play with it (he shouldn't, but he will). The missing bayonet lug, and the flash guard (that are being updated) need to be there to look more accurate, and also it needs the bolt in the very bottom of the handle. It comes with a flat disk and a target circle for the scope, but nothing for the smaller front hole. Because it already comes with so much hardware, I would just include the bolts for the scope and un-model the printed ones (as well as on the Hegstler and the handle side). It came with the curled wires for the power cells, but they seemed too short to work, and his examples on his site appeared to have longer cords. I was on the fence about using them as many ANH blasters don't have them, and I like it without. The instructions were fairly good, but the pages got shuffled and weren't numbered, and there are a few key parts that must be done in order or else you can't access the bolt locations (I was also missing a page, but he shared it with me by message). The bolt sprint is very strong, and I imagined sliding it back and letting it snap, but it probably would damage the gun if that happened. 3D prints are all fairly delicate, and this blaster shouldn't be dropped, where other blasters that are metal or rubber probably are sturdier (but cost more, or have less detail). Modifications I made to the kit: - Used XTC 3D to fill all print lines - Used Filler Primer and Bondo to further fill some print lines - Made my own Bayonet Lug that was missing - Because of the lug, did not use the 7th T-track rail - Filled in the redundant left side muzzle flash guard slot - Filled and sanded the joint where the barrel gets attached. - drilled out the barrel a bit deeper at the muzzle to appear black - All of the M4 bolts in the kit didn't quite self-thread into the printed holes for them, I had to pre-drill them larger (I believe a 9/64" bit) which made them work great. - drilled out scope screws to replace with real screws - drilled out handle screw to replace with real screw - drilled out Hengstler screw to replace with real screw - On the scope, replaced plastic disk with a plastic lens I had, as well as a small one for the front of the scope - Added a glass cover for the counter numbers - Cut off round details on the rear site, replaced with more perfect plastic circles - Cut notches with a triangular file in the rear sight - Added "knurled" texture to the front sights - Used Bondo to eliminate seams in the scope once assembled - Added a second small rubber band to the trigger - replaced Phillips head bolts (on one spot that thread into the rod on the folding stock) with hex bolts that I had - Added a magnet and screws to the connection for the folding stock - added a strip of plastic to the magazine slot to make it fit better - Added a 5mm LED bulb for the detail on the end of the magazine (kit came with a bolt instead) - replaced the Phillips head screws for the magnets in the magazine with slotted screws - Painted the spring to darken shine - Painted several of the long tube Chicago screws ( on the folding stock) to darken the bright shine
  5. @T-Jay Ooh, sorry I missed this, I finished it all yesterday, so that repair would be difficult. The keyhole is only on that one side, see the post below, the lug side is fine. I can maybe see if I can fix it, but it is all clear coated now, making a modification like that more difficult. It is not a rotated barrel, as the front sight array fits in slots on top. Can you send a reference pic, I can pass it along to the maker?
  6. Thanks @gmrhodes13 , I just posted for access. Blaster continued to completion: I have made more progress on the blaster, and just completed it. Some things need to be glued, like the T-tracks and other smaller details, but some of the stronger connections are different. The kit uses M3 and M4 allen fasteners in many places (similar to the muzzle ones) that make it feel much more secure. There are also lots of nice design features, where if you assemble it in the correct order, there are holes to aid in assembly. Things like the grip (which has a rubber band for the trigger that I thought would eventually wear out but be glued in a way to be inaccessible) actually all sort of lock together, and once the bolts secure it to the upper body keep it all closed but it can be removed later: Other modifications: On the counter, I painted the raised numbers white (sort of dry brushed the high points), and added my window with a minimal amount of E6000 (do not use CA glue on any clear lenses, as it usually fogs them in a permanent way). It gets bolted on as well.: The folding stock all went together well, and while it is a little floppy on the long side arms (which I may later reinforce with a strip of aluminum or stainless steel on the backside), when it is closed up, it looks really good. The one issue was I couldn't get the rod to "clip" to the protrusion below the muzzle. It just didn't fit quite right which may have been the finishing and paint, or a slight alignment issue. The last thing I wanted was for it to detach when I was holding it, so as a failsafe I drilled out the rod recess, and added a small flat magnet. I screwed in two very tine steel screws to the muzzle protrusion (painted black after this), and now it is held firm by the magnets: The spring was fairly brightly coated, and it was distracting, so I gave it a quick brushing of black acrylic to make it look more like the blaster props. The spring is still quite strong, and sliding back the bolt all the way would be challenging, but I can slide it back an inch or so and let it snap closed with a satisfying sound that shouldn't break the blaster: So I got it all assembled, and painted the remaining screws, and it was complete and new looking: But... I wanted a minimal amount of weathering. I know many can get carried away, and I have a few other costumes where I had to walk it back, and paint it back to black in a lot of spots because it was too weathered. So I hit it in a few spots that would get abrasion going in and out of the holster (muzzle, flash guards, scope, folding stock, front sight, butt cap, and a few other spots. None on the handle or the t-tracks or the back part of the counter, and gold on the scope and the front part of the counter. I love how it turned out: Some of the features of this kit, the sliding bolt, the folding stock, and the removable magazine (held in with magnets, though I had to add a thin flat rectangle of plastic in the magazine slot to keep it from rattling, and to keep the fit more snug): So it is complete. Total time over a few weeks was about 14 hours. My review of the Imperial Arms 3D E-11 Blaster (Version 3) kit: Pros: It turned out looking really good. Most parts that should move do move (like the butt cap strap holder). A lot of care and attention has been put into the model so that it assembles really well and in some clever ways, and lines up everywhere. The print lines are very fine, so it needs less finishing work than some other models, but still, in my mind for a blaster to work best, it needs to be so smooth that no lines are visible, so it still needs that high level of finishing work. Many bolts are actual bolts, I only drilled out and replaced ones on the scope, the side of the handle, and on the Hengstler. Some pieces are engineered to be stronger, like the front sight and the front muzzle, by going through slots to the barrel for additional strength. The maker Imperial Arms 3D is usually fairly responsive over Instagram Chat, and on previous builds as well as this one, he plans to update the future kits based on feedback. He already is planning to take out the left side muzzle flash guard and to model and add the bayonet lug. Cons: While I love the folding stock and that care was made to make it look like the thickness of the original, the side strips are pretty floppy as a 3D print. I don't think any trooper actually uses the folding stock, so it isn't an issue with trooping, but I feel like that piece is likely to fail at some point if my kit were to play with it (he shouldn't, but he will). The missing bayonet lug, and the flash guard (that are being updated) need to be there to look more accurate, and also it needs the bolt in the very bottom of the handle. It comes with a flat disk and a target circle for the scope, but nothing for the smaller front hole. Because it already comes with so much hardware, I would just include the bolts for the scope and un-model the printed ones (as well as on the Hegstler and the handle side). It came with the curled wires for the power cells, but they seemed too short to work, and his examples on his site appeared to have longer cords. I was on the fence about using them as many ANH blasters don't have them, and I like it without. The instructions were fairly good, but the pages got shuffled and weren't numbered, and there are a few key parts that must be done in order or else you can't access the bolt locations (I was also missing a page, but he shared it with me by message). The bolt sprint is very strong, and I imagined sliding it back and letting it snap, but it probably would damage the gun if that happened. 3D prints are all fairly delicate, and this blaster shouldn't be dropped, where other blasters that are metal or rubber probably are sturdier (but cost more, or have less detail). Modifications I made to the kit: - Used XTC 3D to fill all print lines - Used Filler Primer and Bondo to further fill some print lines - Made my own Bayonet Lug that was missing - Because of the lug, did not use the 7th T-track rail - Filled in the redundant left side muzzle flash guard slot - Filled and sanded the joint where the barrel gets attached. - drilled out the barrel a bit deeper at the muzzle to appear black - All of the M4 bolts in the kit didn't quite self-thread into the printed holes for them, I had to pre-drill them larger (I believe a 9/64" bit) which made them work great. - drilled out scope screws to replace with real screws - drilled out handle screw to replace with real screw - drilled out Hengstler screw to replace with real screw - On the scope, replaced plastic disk with a plastic lens I had, as well as a small one for the front of the scope - Added a glass cover for the counter numbers - Cut off round details on the rear site, replaced with more perfect plastic circles - Cut notches with a triangular file in the rear sight - Added "knurled" texture to the front sights - Used Bondo to eliminate seams in the scope once assembled - Added a second small rubber band to the trigger - replaced Phillips head bolts (on one spot that thread into the rod on the folding stock) with hex bolts that I had - Added a magnet and screws to the connection for the folding stock - added a strip of plastic to the magazine slot to make it fit better - Added a 5mm LED bulb for the detail on the end of the magazine (kit came with a bolt instead) - replaced the Phillips head screws for the magnets in the magazine with slotted screws - Painted the spring to darken shine - Painted several of the long tube Chicago screws ( on the folding stock) to darken the bright shine
  7. TK-25622 just approved with my ANH Stunt. Requesting access: https://www.501st.com/members/displaymemberdetails.php?userID=31203 Thanks!
  8. Quick update: My ANH Stunt Stormtrooper was just approved by my GML. Now to take photos for EIB and Centurion!
  9. Just put on a layer of satin black. This is my favorite part, when you can really see all of your hard work pay off. Always nice when it is painting time to have a few days of hot, but not too hot, dry windy days. I did notice when putting a piece out yesterday to dry after washing dust, that it started to warp a little in the sun, so I am trying to get my painting done before the sun beam cuts through my painting area in the afternoon. [Note: It is still "glossy" being wet.]
  10. Just put on a layer of satin black. This is my favorite part, when you can really see all of your hard work pay off. Always nice when it is painting time to have a few days of hot, but not too hot, dry windy days. I did notice when putting a piece out yesterday to dry after washing dust, that it started to warp a little in the sun, so I am trying to get my painting done before the sun beam cuts through my painting area in the afternoon. [Note: It is still "glossy" being wet.]
  11. Blaster continued: This kit does have some nice details, and many of the fasteners are functional or real, but not all of them. I usually modify most kits, replacing any printed "screws" with real ones, or any other round details I can swap out. Like on the rear sight, I sanded off the round detail, and sliced two pieces of a wall anchor to glue on for that perfect round shape. I also added in that 5mm LED for the domed detail on the end of the magazine. Reading the threads on here, I also added the rear sight notches, and added the knurled texture to the front sights. I used epoxy putty, the first time I laid it on and rolled the tool, and it rolled it off the piece. Second attempt worked, I put the putty on, waited five minutes, and then tried the knurled texture. Success! The parts all primed, I moved to assemble some pieces before black painting. Parts that were smooth and nice already got standard flat black primer, Parts that needed a final smoothing got filler primer (grey). Some nice things I discovered about this Imperial Arms 3D kit: In the upper right, you can see some of the things like the flash guard and the sights actually go through a slot, and down to the barrel, for strength (flash guard piece marked in magenta). Many parts use functional fasteners, aesthetic on the muzzle end here, but many pieces like the handle and the scope rail, and the magazine all get "bolted on" which should make for a stronger prop than one that is all glued: A note on filler primer. It works well as it is as a matte surface, but to get an even nicer surface, you can use fine steel wool to quickly rub the rough surface off (30 seconds), and the "burnish" it with a dry paper towel (30 seconds) and it literally shines. I have used this to prep a master for casting, but now I do it on everything if a shiny surface is what I am after. Painting and gluing more today, so I should have this in my holster by Halloween!
  12. Blaster continued: This kit does have some nice details, and many of the fasteners are functional or real, but not all of them. I usually modify most kits, replacing any printed "screws" with real ones, or any other round details I can swap out. Like on the rear sight, I sanded off the round detail, and sliced two pieces of a wall anchor to glue on for that perfect round shape. I also added in that 5mm LED for the domed detail on the end of the magazine. Reading the threads on here, I also added the rear sight notches, and added the knurled texture to the front sights. I used epoxy putty, the first time I laid it on and rolled the tool, and it rolled it off the piece. Second attempt worked, I put the putty on, waited five minutes, and then tried the knurled texture. Success! The parts all primed, I moved to assemble some pieces before black painting. Parts that were smooth and nice already got standard flat black primer, Parts that needed a final smoothing got filler primer (grey). Some nice things I discovered about this Imperial Arms 3D kit: In the upper right, you can see some of the things like the flash guard and the sights actually go through a slot, and down to the barrel, for strength (flash guard piece marked in magenta). Many parts use functional fasteners, aesthetic on the muzzle end here, but many pieces like the handle and the scope rail, and the magazine all get "bolted on" which should make for a stronger prop than one that is all glued: A note on filler primer. It works well as it is as a matte surface, but to get an even nicer surface, you can use fine steel wool to quickly rub the rough surface off (30 seconds), and the "burnish" it with a dry paper towel (30 seconds) and it literally shines. I have used this to prep a master for casting, but now I do it on everything if a shiny surface is what I am after. Painting and gluing more today, so I should have this in my holster by Halloween!
  13. The final piece: the E-11 blaster. [This thread duplicates the blaster part of my build thread over in the ANH stunt armor section] I submitted for basic approval already, without the blaster, as I wanted to get the ball rolling, and the blaster isn't required. But of course, I can't wait to have it for trooping. For my clone, I used a really nice 3D printed kit from Imperial Arms 3D. I know many scoff at 3D parts, but I have experience finishing them, and as his kit looked really nice (his new Version 3 of the E-11) I was curious to see how it would work. His prints are very finely textured. It has a metal spring, sliding bolt, folding stock, and magazine that comes out with magnets. In the past too, he was responsive over Instagram and has adapted the clone blaster based on my feedback. I already have found two minor accuracy improvements, so I will see if he can add those to future kits. He does offer "finished kits" but I don't know for certain if they would be as finished as 501st people like. I prefer to complete it myself, and swap out printed screws for the real ones, and other modifications. Here is what the full kit looks like (so many pieces!): Instead of my usual dance with coat after coat of Bondo glazing putty and filler primer, I am trying a new product, XTC 3D. It is a sort of two part epoxy like mix that you brush on, and it "self-levels" on the prints. It is sandable, but doesn't need as much as other processes do. Once I figured out the best application process, it actually is going to be my new go-to method of finishing a 3D print. The key is to mix very little, 5 ml of the one, and 2.5 ml of the other part. You have about five minutes of good glazing time where it really spreads out nicely. After that, it begins to thicken, and while it is good for filling the backs of parts, or less-detailed areas, it no longer will nicely level out. I found it also works best when the side up is all you do, so to do a "box" shape like the magazine takes about four passes. In about two hours, it is cured, and you can do another side. Here is what it looks like when it is working perfectly: All told, I have probably mixed about ten "batches" and done light coats on parts, second coats on some, and third coats on trickier surfaces like the t-tracks that need to be really smooth. It sounds like a lot, but I just do one or two passes a day, and it is ready to go in a few days. Adjustments to his model: I found so far two inaccurate little pieces, for some reason he has a second muzzle flash guard on the other side. I used epoxy putty to fill that slot, and will sand it smooth. The other is the kit is missing the bayonet lug. I thought maybe I had lost it, but looking at his site and the pictures of finished blasters, they are all missing it. So I decided it was simple enough a piece, I would just find a dowel that fit in the hole, and cut my own. Once coated with filler primer, it looks like a metal part: Finally, I plan to hit my old drawer of antique flat head screws and bolts to replace any printed ones, including those five on the front of the scope. Also, while the kit comes with a flat disk of clear plexiglass for the scope lens, I wanted a more domed one. One benefit of having a 6-year old boy is that a lot of toys have lenses or little magnifiers, so I save all of them for things like this. Two worked, and I had to grind them down a little, but the fit nicely now. Also, by coincidence, there was this shard of plastic that found my foot a few days ago, and it is slightly curved, perfect for the Hengstler window. Cut down and set it, it should work well. His print has raised numbers, so I will paint those white, and then glue the window on top:
  14. The final piece: the E-11 blaster. [I will duplicate this part as a new posting in the ANH E-11 build section] I submitted for basic approval already, without the blaster, as I wanted to get the ball rolling, and the blaster isn't required. But of course, I can't wait to have it for trooping. For my clone, I used a really nice 3D printed kit from Imperial Arms 3D. I know many scoff at 3D parts, but I have experience finishing them, and as his kit looked really nice (his new Version 3 of the E-11) I was curious to see how it would work. His prints are very finely textured. It has a metal spring, sliding bolt, folding stock, and magazine that comes out with magnets. In the past too, he was responsive over Instagram and has adapted the clone blaster based on my feedback. I already have found two minor accuracy improvements, so I will see if he can add those to future kits. He does offer "finished kits" but I don't know for certain if they would be as finished as 501st people like. I prefer to complete it myself, and swap out printed screws for the real ones, and other modifications. Here is what the full kit looks like (so many pieces!): Instead of my usual dance with coat after coat of Bondo glazing putty and filler primer, I am trying a new product, XTC 3D. It is a sort of two part epoxy like mix that you brush on, and it "self-levels" on the prints. It is sandable, but doesn't need as much as other processes do. Once I figured out the best application process, it actually is going to be my new go-to method of finishing a 3D print. The key is to mix very little, 5 ml of the one, and 2.5 ml of the other part. You have about five minutes of good glazing time where it really spreads out nicely. After that, it begins to thicken, and while it is good for filling the backs of parts, or less-detailed areas, it no longer will nicely level out. I found it also works best when the side up is all you do, so to do a "box" shape like the magazine takes about four passes. In about two hours, it is cured, and you can do another side. Here is what it looks like when it is working perfectly: All told, I have probably mixed about ten "batches" and done light coats on parts, second coats on some, and third coats on trickier surfaces like the t-tracks that need to be really smooth. It sounds like a lot, but I just do one or two passes a day, and it is ready to go in a few days. Adjustments to his model: I found so far two inaccurate little pieces, for some reason he has a second muzzle flash guard on the other side. I used epoxy putty to fill that slot, and will sand it smooth. The other is the kit is missing the bayonet lug. I thought maybe I had lost it, but looking at his site and the pictures of finished blasters, they are all missing it. So I decided it was simple enough a piece, I would just find a dowel that fit in the hole, and cut my own. Once coated with filler primer, it looks like a metal part: Finally, I plan to hit my old drawer of antique flat head screws and bolts to replace any printed ones, including those five on the front of the scope. Also, while the kit comes with a flat disk of clear plexiglass for the scope lens, I wanted a more domed one. One benefit of having a 6-year old boy is that a lot of toys have lenses or little magnifiers, so I save all of them for things like this. Two worked, and I had to grind them down a little, but the fit nicely now. Also, by coincidence, there was this shard of plastic that found my foot a few days ago, and it is slightly curved, perfect for the Hengstler window. Cut down and set it, it should work well. His print has raised numbers, so I will paint those white, and then glue the window on top:
  15. I got up once again at 5:30am, and suited up, set up some lights in the driveway, and took some turnaround pics. Submitted to my GML for basic approval today, wish me luck!
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