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usaeatt2

E-11 STEEL PIPE BUILD

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Eh. Stalled out for now. Sander broke. I still need to pick up pipe, styrene, and bondo. ...and I will not tap into my armor budget. I'm hoping to get back on track in a week or two but for now I'm just going to stare at my butt stock and dream. ;)

 

Bummer.  Staring at butts and dreaming is an activity for the beach, not prop building ;) .  Patiently awaiting your next post...

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Definitely looking good Aaron. Can't say the same for my current paint situation, but this is neither the time or place for that. :(

 

Can't wait to see your paint application!

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Definitely looking good Aaron. Can't say the same for my current paint situation, but this is neither the time or place for that. :(Can't wait to see your paint application!

Yeah... I think I'd rather build another blaster than risk some paint calamity...

Edited by usaeatt2

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Update: Building rail # 4.

Musical inspiration: Samsara Blues Experiment - Center of the Sun (fast forward to 9:00 for about the smoothest breakdown you've ever heard).

Music is such a big part of my shop, that I've decided to add a selection with each update... :)

 

I thought I had 1/16" steel bar.  As it turns out, what I bought was 1/8" X 3/4" steel bar - DUH!!!  I discovered this HALFWAY through making the steel rail.  This came to my attention after cutting and filing everything, then trying to make the bend in the front.  1/8" steel bar takes a fair amount of force to bend 90 degrees.  A lot more force than 1/16" bar.  I can't BELIEVE I missed this, especially while filing and cutting...  Making another 1/8" rail doesn't solve my problem in any way, so I abandoned it.  Did I say "DUH" yet?  Back to several stores...to find out they don't sell 1/16" steel bar, at least not in their normal stock.  I'm sure I could order it.  So as not to leave feeling defeated, I bought 1/16" X 1-1/4" aluminum angle.  I thought I'd give it a shot and see how it comes out.  Aluminum is easy to work and should only take an evening...and if it's too floppy, well, then I'll have another rail for my collection.

 

I finished the 1/16" aluminum rail and even came up with a better mounting system for the counter.  I like the new rail MUCH BETTER than the other ones.  The 1/8" rail looks gigantic next to the 1/16" rail.  Thanks goes to Germain for convincing me this was necessary.  The counter now sits FLUSH with the receiver tube.  The rail is stiffer than I thought and having the counter against the receiver helps to "counter" :)  any bowing.  The rail actually fits INSIDE the counter now.  To mount the counter, I made "blind" nut plates using square nuts.  I CA glued them to the rail.  The glue just has to hold them in place until the screws are threaded and tightened.  I used socket head machine screws with a couple fiber washers to mount the scope - I'll probably change these out for cheese head screws when I get them ordered (see further discussion below).  I also corrected the scope alignment while I had everything apart. 

 

3D73750B-40FB-4EAE-AC53-081E23A2BA19_zps

 

5D699174-7F31-4717-B113-44AB65901A64_zps

 

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6C392773-25CB-49D3-A007-AA3A13EB1FE4_zps

 

Slightly off topic, but educational...I've collected a sizeable amount of spare hardware over the years - after sorting through several hundred socket head screws, I found a unique screw of the correct size to mount the rail.  It's called a cheese head screw or low socket screw.  I only had (1) screw, so I asked about "cheese head" screws at my local Ace hardware store.  They looked at me like I was from a galaxy far, far away.  Turns out some hardware manufacturers use the term interchangeably with "pan head" screws.  They're very different - and NOT interchangeable.  I found them in my McMaster-Carr catalog (WHY I don't just look in that catalog FIRST is beyond me), so I may buy those for the rest of the scope/counter hardware.  Somehow, these screws just look "more professional" to me.  Screen accurate?  Probably not.  Do they look like they belong on a weapon more than pan head, button head or socket head screws?  IMHO, YES!

 

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TOTALLY off topic, but it's in my photobucket next to blaster pictures...  We went to a cool wedding last weekend.  Believe it or not, the bride wore Converse Chuck Taylors.  THAT'S just WHO she is, and I'm blessed to have a diverse group of cool friends.  This is my wife and I with the bride - showing off our shoes.  We wore them to the wedding just for her!

 

E6111140-45CD-47B4-9589-B48C44C3EC23_zps

 

And more awesome news - a very good friend of ours is playing at Chicago House of Blues on June 1st!  Back stage passes!  SCORE!!!!!!!

 

Next update is finishing a more accurate set of power cylinders, figuring out how to install the T-track and finally PAINT!!!

Edited by usaeatt2

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Looking good. I know you decide d to go with 1/16th but remember if the steel is being a pain just a little spot heating right above where you want to bend will always make it very easy as long as you have a good edge to bend it over.

The anticipation on this one is killing me. ;)

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Nice work Aaron. I'm sure you got your feet shuffling on the dance floor!

 

Hmmm, 1/16 flat bar. (= 1.58mm) Most of our stuff is metric here, so either 1mm or 3mm. 1mm will definately be too thin. Might have to hunt around specialist steel places for imperial measurment stuff, or 2mm. Nice that you could hide the bracke inside the ounter now.

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Heh... You said paint like you're genuinely excited about it? Trying to psyche yourself up for it?

 

Looking good brother!

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Looking good. I know you decide d to go with 1/16th but remember if the steel is being a pain just a little spot heating right above where you want to bend will always make it very easy as long as you have a good edge to bend it over.

The anticipation on this one is killing me. ;)

 

Brian, I did have everything clamped down in a vise against a sharp edge to make the bend...just too lazy to walk across the shop for a torch.  I thought about it though.  Usually, I don't finish projects...I move on to something else.  If I never finish it, no one can criticize because it's still a work in progress.  No worries though, I'm liking how this project is progressing, so I plan to finish. ;)

 

Nice work Aaron. I'm sure you got your feet shuffling on the dance floor!

 

Hmmm, 1/16 flat bar. (= 1.58mm) Most of our stuff is metric here, so either 1mm or 3mm. 1mm will definately be too thin. Might have to hunt around specialist steel places for imperial measurment stuff, or 2mm. Nice that you could hide the bracke inside the ounter now.

 

Yep, there was plenty of dancing because most of us were wearing really comfortable shoes!  If you'd like, I will send you a piece of 1/16" aluminum angle - I've got 3 feet leftover.  Send your address in a PM and I'll get it in the mail.  Those specialist steel places will rob you blind.

 

Heh... You said paint like you're genuinely excited about it? Trying to psyche yourself up for it?

 

Looking good brother!

 

I AM trying to psych myself up for it!  Barring any last minute change of mind, I've decided to skip the wrinkle paint and go with a light textured finish, then topcoat everything with a light coat of E-11 flat black.  Thanks for the compliments!

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Yep, there was plenty of dancing because most of us were wearing really comfortable shoes! 

 

:icon_worth:

 

If you'd like, I will send you a piece of 1/16" aluminum angle - I've got 3 feet leftover. Send your address in a PM and I'll get it in the mail. Those specialist steel places will rob you blind.

 

 

 

Appreciate the offer Aaron, but it wouldn't be worth our time or efforts for a foot long piece of bar. And I don't think your thicker stuff looked too bad anyway :duim: . Tim's has also come up good using 1/8, and my 3mm will be slightly thinner than that. Thanks again.

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I think those two pictures are pretty obvious, 1/16" looks so much better! And the pan-head screws look very nice too. Electronics aside, it could already be finished without this stupid metal receiver you have to paint :P

 

And yeah, i too love the Converse Chuck Taylor and i have this pretty collector pair i love to wear even though it's not for dancing ^_^ :

dsc_0424.jpg

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I think those two pictures are pretty obvious, 1/16" looks so much better! And the pan-head screws look very nice too. Electronics aside, it could already be finished without this stupid metal receiver you have to paint :P

 

And yeah, i too love the Converse Chuck Taylor and i have this pretty collector pair i love to wear even though it's not for dancing ^_^ :

dsc_0424.jpg

 

The comparison picture speaks for itself, no?  THANK YOU, GERMAIN!

Getting closer to being done - one step at a time...

 

I didn't even know they made Metallica Chuck's!  Our bride friend will be thrilled to know (if she doesn't already).

Nice Pink Floyd cup in the background too!  We have a friend who plays keyboard and sings backup vocals in a Pink Floyd tribute band named Think Floyd.  They ONLY play Pink Floyd covers...that's it, nothing else, but they are PRECISE.  If you close your eyes at their gigs, it's like being at a Pink Floyd concert!

Thanks for sharing!

Edited by usaeatt2

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Ooooooohhhhh, this is SOOOOO COOOOOL!!!! :peace:

 

Next update could be a game changer.  Maybe my proudest blaster achievement so far...

Could barely contain myself, so I thought I'd take a page out of Dark CMF's book and leave you wondering for a day or two... ;)

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Damn, don't let us in the blind too long, i won't have an internet access for much longer and i would love to see this one painted before it happens  :lol:

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Damn, don't let us in the blind too long, i won't have an internet access for much longer and i would love to see this one painted before it happens  :lol:

 

No internet access?  It's getting tough here to find a place that DOESN'T have internet access...are you going on vacation to somewhere exotic?  We spent a week in Africa on a safari and most places didn't even have power, let alone internet, but even the Masai tribe people had cell phones!!!  I asked how they charge the phones...apparently, a member of the tribe is given all the cell phones and they walk sometimes 50 miles to the nearest village that has power.  They sell crafts and jewelry to pay for having their phones charged.

 

Anyway, I'm not much closer to paint and I found out about ANOTHER product through a post this morning.  My FISD firearm education continues...  Given Dark CMF's recent experience with easily scratched flat paint, finding out about and researching Brownell's "GunKote" may have changed my paint choice once again.  A baked on, extremely durable, matte finish seems like a great choice.

 

My next update involves making more things functional.  Currently, everything works, but I still need to clean it up cosmetically.  I also ordered "low profile socket head cap screws" to replace all the add-on hardware.  And on an impulse, I ordered a roll-wrapped carbon fiber tube for a pipe build.  I'm going to call it "Hightech Blastech".

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On the edge of my seat!

 

Although, I'll point out that when I mentioned something about heat earlier, Vern pointed out that heat and the Doopydoos Resin are not a very good match up. Other than that, the baked approach might be viable. (I did think about that for a very, very brief moment, but I saw Vern's words in my mind's eye and just moved along. ;) )

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I did think about that for a very, very brief moment, but I saw Vern's words in my mind's eye and just moved along. ;) )

 

Gotcha.

 

For this build, I can use heat...but not on the next build.  I'm taking advantage while I can.  I had the receiver hotter than 450 degrees while soldering.  Brownell's calls for 100 degree preheat, apply GunKote, then bake for an hour at 300 degrees.  I'm not sure what the olive drab coating is on all my original parts (like your folding stock), but I know for a FACT, the olive drab stuff is TOUGH.  I've welded it, torched it and sanded it - about the only thing that removes it is filing.  I HOPE that's how GunKote works - and you can get it in 6 different colors: matte black, gloss black, matte brushed stainless, matte olive drab green, matte gray and gloss gunmetal blue.  I think the GunKote matte black is the ticket for me.  Now, what to do with the 8 various cans of black I bought for testing...

 

http://www.brownells.com/gunsmith-tools-supplies/metal-prep-coloring/paint-finishes/bake-on-aerosol-paints/gun-kote-trade-oven-cure-gun-finish-prod1150.aspx

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Come paint my car!

 

LOL!!!  Your Grand Prix?  That car looks just FINE from what I've seen.  I'm guessing original paint too, which makes it even better!

 

Someday, I might try that, but for now, I pay a professional to paint cars and motorcycles.  Bodywork is way too much work to risk screwing up right at the end.

 

I have a friend who painted his '69 Camaro in his two car garage and he claims it was easy with his HVLP gun...it looked great after a few days of wet sanding and buffing!

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LoL.. Duh. This isn't a DD build.

 

Don't I feel sheepish...

Edited by Dark CMF

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Update: Functional "Shots Fired" Hengstler Counter

Musical Inspiration: Causa Sui "Euporie"

 

Videos at the end.

 

Although the counter is functional now, I ran into a snag that's going to require a different Hengstler coil.  The coil I have is 24V, which requires two 9V batteries wired in series.  Both batteries fit in the short E-11 magazine, but JUST BARELY.  My intention is to make everything fully functional, including the bolt action.  The two 9V batteries take up the WHOLE magazine, including the shell ramp area.  This means the bolt can't slide past the magazine without trying to load the top of the battery into the chamber.  That obviously won't work...  I have two options: 1) replace my Hengstler 24V coil with a 12V coil (which means I could eliminate one battery) or 2) grind the chambering rails off the bolt.  Although no one would ever see it, I'd rather not grind anything off the bolt.

 

It was quite a trick to fit everything without using ANY space inside the receiver.  The batteries are inside the magazine, the switch is inside the grip and of course, the Hengstler is self contained.  I wanted to run the wires inside the receiver, but I couldn't do that AND make the bolt functional without grinding a clearance slot in the bolt.  So, I compromised and tried to hide the wires.  I used RC airplane connectors so I can unplug the wires and disassemble everything.  Let me just say I can ABSOLUTELY see the advantages to a resin build now.  The trigger switch would have been a simple project for a resin build...

 

So here's how it started:

 

AFEB79C4-98EF-4D25-9F15-46C1B18EE555_zps

 

There is NO clearance inside the trigger group, even for a tiny 2.5mm switch.  I had to figure out another way.  There's a small pin that extends down into the grip when the trigger is pulled.  That seemed like a good bet.  Here's the pin before pulling the trigger (bottom, center of picture)...

 

04D0ED17-5E8E-4B6B-83C7-BC5586C26AFD_zps

 

And with the trigger pulled all the way back...

 

8ABC9F5B-F1B9-4EA7-B544-705A28803F18_zps

 

Now, I just had to figure out a way to make the pin hit the switch.  I used oven bake clay to determine how much space I had to play with inside the grip.  I essentially loaded the whole area with clay, assembled the trigger and grip, then pulled the trigger to make a pin impression.  Then, I trimmed the excess clay and carefully disassembled everything.  This effectively created a "negative space" mold (I'm not sure what else to call it).  The clay showed me how much space I had to play with and MOST importantly, where to mount the switch so the pin would hit it.  There's not a lot of room for error when the button on the switch is only 1/8" wide.

 

2489FD6D-CD33-4A6F-8818-F83A3978E6D8_zps

 

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16841B4F-9C5D-438D-9AF0-4D1356951AE3_zps

 

Next, I needed to determine if the pin would actually push the button, so I soldered some wires to a switch to use for testing.

Soldering wires to these tiny "surface mount" switches was a 'B', but it all worked out.  I ended up trashing this one during testing.

The second switch I soldered came out much better - it's actually the switch in the gun right now!  Penny used as a size reference...

 

9AD32668-4C17-4D3E-A4D9-93CD6B626655_zps

 

I tested switch continuity after soldering.

 

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This is where the trial and error starts...  Physically, I can't put the switch anywhere EXCEPT somewhere within my negative space clay mold.

I started carving and testing.  Carve a little, do a test.  Carve some more, do a test.  Repeat until there's no interference and the pin pushes the button at exactly the same time the sear releases inside the trigger group.

 

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Here, you can see the inside of the grip.  The slot in the middle is where the pin goes when the trigger is pulled all the way back.  I can use my clay mold in the trigger group or in the grip to check clearances.

 

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I ended up carving away a lot more than I thought, but each test told me I needed to go a little deeper.

 

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And here's the final version of the clay mold:

 

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Funny thing is, after all that work, the clay mold just tells me where to put the switch and then it's garbage.

I carved out the area identified by the mold inside the grip, did one last test, then glued the switch with a couple drops of CA glue.

I had to be EXTRA careful not to get ANY glue near the button.

 

B5FD66DC-C4CF-45D8-857C-A2E71FA81231_zps

 

I cut up an old computer "ribbon cable" for the wires.  The wires run up the back side of the grip.  I needed them to run forward to the magazine well.  I used the dremel to carve a groove for the wires inside the grip.  Here you can see the wires exiting the front edge of the grip and running along the edge of the trigger group.  When the folding stock is in the normal position, the wires are hidden.  When everything is painted, I don't think anyone would notice them anyway.  Well, MAYBE Germain would notice them...

 

5566C873-B13E-4461-85FD-908CD912E7A4_zps

 

With everything assembled and the wires routed through the grip, I did another continuity test:

 

 

If you made it this far, you lucked out, because I got really busy trying to get this done tonight and forgot to take pictures.  The only picture I took between here and the completed videos was the batteries mounted in the magazine.  See how high that top battery is?  You will see the problem that causes in the next video... 

 

71930421-A5BE-41B7-B981-AE2D1B556A76_zps

 

I made two final videos.  The first video is with the magazine fully seated and shows how far the 9V batteries extend to the top of the magazine.  While "firing" you would normally hear the trigger mechanism clicking, but the bolt can't extend forward, so the sear is stuck.  You only hear "single clicking" in this video - that's just the counter counting and no sear release.  If I pull the trigger with the bolt fully retracted like normal, the bolt would release, accelerate forward, then hit the battery and most likely cause a short circuit or worse, shear off the battery terminals.  There really is a significant amount of force behind the bolt.  You'll see and HEAR the bolt action in the last video...

 

 

While typing this, I realized I could demonstrate full function by releasing the magazine and sliding it out about 1/2".  This provides clearance for the bolt and is essentially the same thing as eliminating one of the 9V batteries.  You can hear "double clicking" in this video - that's the sear releasing inside the trigger group and the counter counting.  Pay attention to the sound of the bolt on the "first shot" at the 13 second mark - it's IMPRESSIVE, even on a crappy cell phone video!!!

 

 

The list is getting shorter and I think I've finally got an excellent option for paint.  I hope you enjoyed this post!

Edited by usaeatt2

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No internet access?  It's getting tough here to find a place that DOESN'T have internet access...are you going on vacation to somewhere exotic?  We spent a week in Africa on a safari and most places didn't even have power, let alone internet, but even the Masai tribe people had cell phones!!!  I asked how they charge the phones...apparently, a member of the tribe is given all the cell phones and they walk sometimes 50 miles to the nearest village that has power.  They sell crafts and jewelry to pay for having their phones charged.

 

Anyway, I'm not much closer to paint and I found out about ANOTHER product through a post this morning.  My FISD firearm education continues...  Given Dark CMF's recent experience with easily scratched flat paint, finding out about and researching Brownell's "GunKote" may have changed my paint choice once again.  A baked on, extremely durable, matte finish seems like a great choice.

 

My next update involves making more things functional.  Currently, everything works, but I still need to clean it up cosmetically.  I also ordered "low profile socket head cap screws" to replace all the add-on hardware.  And on an impulse, I ordered a roll-wrapped carbon fiber tube for a pipe build.  I'm going to call it "Hightech Blastech".

 

Crazy anecdote about this Africa trip! But sometimes old houses in the rural France can be cut from the internet, the TV and without enough cellphone network for internet. But don't get me wrong, i like it a lot, i'm easily stressed and making a break from internet is really relaxing. 

 

So for your next update, have you managed to make working the hengstler incrementation along with pressing the trigger?

 

Edit: Oups, we posted at the same time :P.

In the beginnig i admit it, i wasn"t really psyched about this mod, but i gotta say it's completely awesome!

Edited by The5thHorseman

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