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Cricket

Imperial Attaché[TK]
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Everything posted by Cricket

  1. Thanks for bookmarking my build! Feel free to ask if you have questions, and be sure to start your own build thread. We love new white armor!!! Cheers!
  2. I might be a little late to the party here, but this is inaccurate. There is nothing in the CRL for the ANH TK regarding the forearms that says anything about the number of squares. I cut off a few of mine, no problems at all. https://databank.501st.com/databank/Costuming:TK_anh_stunt Forearms Forearms are fully closed. Overlap construction is only allowable for kits that come with the cover strip molded in to the part. OPTIONAL Level two certification (if applicable): OPTIONAL Level three certification (if applicable): No return edge on the inside of the front of the forearm is allowed. Forearms must be constructed using the butt joint and cover strip method. Overlap construction is not allowed. For the ANK TK, it's never been an issue for basic through Centurion approvals.
  3. Oh, and that thing you mentioned about adding ABS strips to stiffen the connection area if you're gluing.... I've never needed to do that. When I cut, I didn't cut right at the ridge at the bottom of the ab (where the cod starts). Instead, I cut about 3/4" below that. This allows a wide secure surface to overlap with your cod and to glue it back on (if you're shortening things). Also, it preserves the vertical ridge on the ab/cod, so you don't have to worry about guessing where to line things back up. The parts will naturally align to that ridge. I hope that makes sense! I very recently shortened my cod on my TK Hero kit, so I'm kind of familiar with how things go.
  4. The build of the FOTK is an entirely different beast. I 3D printed a set for my son (scaled down, of course). Looking again at my build, there is a strap riveted to the interior of the ab, and snaps were attached to that. This is how Tony's (Ukswrath) FOTK build went, so I did pretty much the same thing. Connection area is totally hidden by the belt. I wouldn't attach the cod directly to the belt of the ANH TK, though. It doesn't seem like it would be all that secure. From what I've seen others do, it's a matter of gluing snap plates to the inside of the ab above where the cod is cut. Add corresponding snap plates to the inside of the cod, then attach your snap/straps.
  5. I actually did cut my cod! And moved it up to fit my shorter torso. I let the parts overlap and glued them back together. You can't see at all that I trimmed things to accommodate my vertically challenged state. I don't see why a cod piece secured to the ab with nylon straps or elastic, or whatever, would be a problem. The belt hides everything where the cut would be, and the elastic at the bottom of the cod/butt plate would keep things from flopping around. (haha... see what I did there?) The FOTK kits have their cods secured separately from the ab using snaps on the inside of the belt. Can anyone tell? I doubt it unless you're staring intensely at the trooper's cod. And if you are doing just that, then you might have other issues going on.
  6. A suggestion: You might consider lining up the tops of the forearms, and trimming from the bottom (while adjusting at the back for width). There is detail at the top that you really don't want to lose too much of. You'll most likely need to recreate the swoop on the inner forearm to accommodate for the size reduction and for mobility. In case you haven't seen it, here is how I sized down a forearm that had ridges on both halves. I think Glen is saying that you cut straight along the bottom of the forearm. But the forearm itself can taper inwards at the wrist- is that what you're asking? So the forearm is slightly more narrow at the wrist, a bit larger at the elbow.
  7. As a smaller trooper I can attest to the fact that if you only pad out your arm/leg armor and not size it to fit you width wise, you're not going to be comfortable or have much mobility at all. No disrespect to Mark, but if I had done as he suggests for you, I would have been waddling around instead of walking. You want to have some room in your arms/legs, but not too much. I've added a little padding to prevent the sniper knee from clipping my thigh, but that's about it. You won't look disproportionate if your torso and limbs are sized correctly. It takes patience and work to size things down, but very much worth it. I heated up the butt plate tab and shaped the snap end to curve better to meet the cod piece so it wouldn't strain on the connecting strap. I did this only after my torso was completely strapped together and the final fit had been achieved.
  8. Offering a little bit of feedback with what I can see here: It looks like your cod is hanging somewhat low on you, which means everything needs to shift upwards a bit. Typically, you should only have an inch or so gap between your cod and your girly bits. When you walk, your thighs shouldn't rub against this part. If they do, then it needs to come up. And you can trim the cod as well- but shifting things up first would be what I'd do before trimming. If you haven't done it already, another thing to look for initially is placement of your ab button box. The top of the ab button box should rest somewhere near the bottom of your sternum. Next, there should be 1-2 fingers' width (horizontal) between the top of the ab button box and the bottom of the chest plate. You can secure the ab and chest plates together and then put them on- if your cod is correctly "high and tight", then you may notice that the ab button box is too high- which means you would need to cut your cod down (on the ab plate) to better position your abdominal plate. And if your ab button box is in the proper location, then you might notice that your chest plate is hitting your chin. At that point, you'd trim around your neck line (and possibly around the arm areas as well). Any modification you do to your armor, try to remember the "As Above, So Below" concept. If you shorten things up in the front, then you will absolutely need to make corresponding modifications to the opposite parts in the back, or else your armor will end up wonky. Just a few personal notes from someone who has built and fitted their fair share of TKs for myself and others: With as many people who complain about armor bites, I'll say this: If your armor fits you properly, it won't hurt. And if it doesn't feel right, it probably needs adjustment. There is a certain lack of mobility that comes with wearing white plastic, but it's not entirely uncomfortable! Looking forward to seeing more of your progress- you're off to a great start!!!
  9. Welcome welcome! Good to see new white armor on smaller troopers! I'll add in another suggestion for fitting: tape all of your ab/chest/butt/kidney/back plate pieces together with blue tape, attaching them all on the insides at the returns (don't tape on the outside, inside simulates best how it actually fits with strapping). Then put it on. Take pics of front, back, both sides. You'll suddenly have a very good idea of how the 'actual size' fits and feels. When you put just the front ab and chest together, the fit can be a little deceptive unless you have the back parts attached as well.
  10. I had to trim a lot into that upper neck area and shoulders on my RS backplate. I also had to heat-curve things on my RS backplate to fit better as well. If trimming makes things fit better, then go for it (just trim conservatively as you go)!
  11. Looking at your pics, have you removed all of the returns off of the ends of your forearms? I see some curving at the ends, but maybe it's just the way the lighting is.
  12. I had issues with my belt sliding up as well. I put some velcro on the armor and corresponding areas of the canvas belt (left and right sides near the kidney), and that solved any slippage issues for me. Maybe worth a try?
  13. Even though my belt was installed snug on the ab, it still liked to shift up and down. I added a little tab of velcro on the ab/cloth belt. It helps it stay put. Looks like you've got the same issue going on. It's common, I believe. Love that last pic of you and your little trooper!!
  14. Yep! Those bells look a heck of a lot better now. Great job!!!
  15. Rather than experimenting blindly with your bell cuts, why not try something easier? The entire suit is made to fit together. For example, the tops of the thighs should follow the lines of the cod. For EIB/Centurion, one of the requirements for the bell/chest relationship is that there is minimal black showing. Take a look again at the reference pic below: For the kits I've built, I figured out how to trim the bell and achieve minimal black space by noting the relationship to the chest plate while it is on the person it is built for. It's easier to do this if you have an assistant, but it can be done when you're on your own (it just takes more time). Put on your torso. Position one bell (with bicep attached) closely on your shoulder so the top of the bell meets the shoulder bridge. You can temporarily attach it with blue tape at the top. You will probably note that the edges of the bell are quite overlapped by the chest and back plates. Using a pencil, follow the edge of the chest and back plates along the bell. This will give you a rough template/guideline for where you need to trim. This trim line is different for every trooper because the edges of the chest and back plates are always unique to each trooper! Remove the bell and trim conservatively. Put the bell back on and resecure it with blue tape. Move your arm forward and back. You'll note areas that are clipping with each other. Using your pencil again, mark these areas where the bell hits the chest/back plate. Remove the bell and trim conservatively. Repeat all the above steps until the top of the bell touches the shoulder bridge, and the edges of the bell and the edges of the chest/back plates no longer significantly interfere with each other. You should end up with shoulder bells that have edges that meet up nicely with the upper torso (think puzzle pieces), but don't have any resistance (for that "minimum black" look!). Hope this helps!
  16. Overall, you're looking pretty sharp there, trooper! Good work! My suggestion to make your armor look a little bit better would be to bring in those shoulder bells a bit. You've got that "linebacker trooper" look. It's nothing that'll stop you from basic approval, but it might get a mention if you plan on applying for your EIB or Centurion awards. As they are now, they're somewhat square. Note how the shoulder bells on these troopers taper inwards. Bells are usually trimmed with a curve (or swoop) to them, not straight up and down (square). Note the cut lines on the yellowed (screen used) bells here: A little bit of trimming will help bring in the shoulder bells a bit and reduce that linebacker look.
  17. Finally got around to taking some proper photos of Cameron fully suited up in his armor today! This trooper Mom approves. Took it out for a stroll in our neighborhood. Because fall, y'all! Cameron reports that the kit is comfortable and totally troopable! Looking forward to when we can get out and do our thing again. Stay safe!
  18. Yep! I have another RS Hero, though. Always gotta keep a shiny white on hand!
  19. From what I'm seeing on the holster I built, the bearing acts as a stopper of sorts. It supports the blaster and prevents the blaster from rotating forward when locking it into the holster. I could be wrong on this, though (I don't have the holster nearby to double check this!). And by adding an extra dimensional element, it looks kind of cool, too.
  20. I'm not entirely sure, sorry. My guess is that having 3 layers allows you to put some extra reinforcement in there. I wouldn't use the holster with just the 3D printed layers alone. I can only imagine someone bumping against you and the blaster snapping off of the holster... and it would be difficult to even notice it was snapped off at all if your helmet is on. Having some metal installed in the bracket adds a bit of strength so that this kind of scenario won't be as likely to happen. This is the image I used for reference. For length, I don't remember exactly what I used, sorry! I had a pack of assorted metric screws and kind of tried out different lengths. They weren't the security torx ones because I couldn't find them in the size I needed. Remember that my build was scaled down, so the length would be different for you anyhow. The screws I used exited the inside of the thigh armor just a little bit... just enough so I could get some e6000 on them to make sure they wouldn't go anywhere and also to cover the ends to prevent scratches. I used the 7mm M3 bearings found here. https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07FW18RQY/ I think I kind of eyeballed things for size. I don't know if you would need to go with a thicker bearing due to scaling, though. Maybe someone else who has built a full-sized holster bracket could chime in here? @ukswrath?
  21. The snaps in the pic look like the typical line 24 snaps that we use on TK builds. That's what I would use. Look for Tandy brand. They attach with a hammer. You'll need a fastener kit like this: https://www.amazon.com/General-Tools-1265-Fastener-Fasteners/dp/B00004T7VT Or if you prefer to use a little less force for a little more money, you can invest in a snap press. It is my second favorite build tool (the Dremel is my #1 tool!). https://www.goldstartool.com/heavy-duty-press-for-grommets-snaps-buttons-rivets-1-die-set.htm
  22. Nope. The chest plate has a slight overlap over the "vest" part of the back/yoke part. I secured the chest plate with industrial velcro at the overlap in the chest area as well as at the side areas where the chest and back plates overlap. It keeps things really secure, but I don't like having to readjust everything each time Cameron suits up. In hindsight (and possibly for future builds), I will probably do this approach: creating a strap across the front part of the back plate that allows for the chest to be secured with snaps. The photo isn't mine, but I like the idea. I think strong magnets would work well for this, too. I probably wouldn't use an ABS strip as they did, but instead use a strap of nylon webbing for this.
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