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E-11 Doopydoos with Sound & Light building thread

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This year I received my doopydoos box and wanted to make something special with light & sound, but also use this blaster for the approval of Centurion level. So I didn't want any of the modifications been seen at the outside of the blaster.

 

I got my inspiration from the building thread of SkyOne  : http://www.whitearmor.net/forum/topic/1 ... r-effects/.

My goal was a E-11 blaster with "walking lights" in the barrel, several fire modes and a digital scope (something like Bulldog44 has made : 

https://www.whitearmor.net/forum/topic/36747-m38-hollow-core-scope-project-2016-bulldog44/

 

As I already finished this project I will use this thread as a reference, summary and explanation of the critical parts/processes.

I hope this project inspires people to create other cool props. When I started this project I didn't know much about Arduino, electrical circuits, working with resin or painting.

This was a great project to learn all these things and opened a whole new world for me.

 

My shopping list:

Main processor:

- Arduino Pro mini 5V 16 Mhz Atmega328 : The main processor
- FT232RL FDTI Basic USB : Tool to program the Arduino board by USB.

Input:
- 10 positions Rotary switch (RM4HAF-10R-V-B) : Switch for different modes
- DIY End-switch : The trigger
Light:
- MR16 with PT4115 chip, DC8-26V  : Led drivers
- 3W RGB-leds 6-pins  : Led's
Sound:
- WT2000MO2 MP3 module
- 3W *2 mini Audio amplifier
- 2 Watt speakers (30x20 mm)

Digital scope:

- 0.66" OLED dispay (64x48) with I2C-protocol. A software-driver can be found at : https://github.com/sparkfun/Micro_OLED_Breakout/tree/V_1.0/Libraries/Arduino

Misc.

- 10K resistors

 

Almost all parts are available on Aliexpress or Ebay. I think the total price of all components is about 30 euros.

 

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Hi Pawel, that sounds VERY interesting. Cannot wait to see detailed photos of this work... :D Imperial regards to the Netherlands :salute:

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First of all the LED's.

 

The MR16 LED-driver contains a PT4115 chip. This chip allows a LED to be dimmed. This used pin is however not connected in the default LED-driver. This way the LED will burn by default. If 0 Volt is applied to this pin the LED will be shut down. If 5 Volt is applied the LED will burn. Each other voltage between 0-5 Volt will dim the LED.

As SkyOne already mentioned in his thread, the power supply of this LED-driver needs to be changed. Standard the 2 large pins are used as power-supply and are shielded by Diodes. As the LED-driver needs to be positioned in the Barrel of the blaster these pins needs to be removed.

24Uiyz2.jpg

 

The power-supply can directly be soldered at the printboard so photo below).

- Green wire : Dim-function of the PT4115 chip (outside pin of the 3 pins on the left side).

-Blue wire : negative voltage (0Volt)

-Red wire : positive voltage. As this driver is designed for >8V I used a 9V battery to supply the voltage.

The pink and white wires are connected to the LED it self.

J1z1hvN.jpg

 

The LED's I used are the same one as decribed by SkyOne.

This is a 3W power RGB-led. As I only use red as color I connected R+ en R-.

CVPHpUu.jpg

 

As I wanted a "walking light" in the barrel I made 5 of these combinations.

Edited by Xinx
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Wonderful to come across your post Pawl. I have always been fascinated with bringing in lights and sound to the E-11 blaster and had carried out heavy research on the matter. After spending countless hours researching arduino, basic knowledge of electronic circuitry, sourced components needed and tallied up costs etc., I ultimately decided to abandon any attempt for a scratch build due to my limited knowledge and skills, and quite frankly, courage! Congratulations on accomplishing this feat and look forward to your documentation on critical processes. Great write-up on the LED portion by the way :duim: Interested also to see how you incorporated the electronics to the doopydoos resin blaster.

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The diameter of the power LED's is exact the same as the inner diameter of the pipe inside the doopydoos blaster,so the LED's can be positioned vertically in the pipe.

The wires of the LED-driver are heat resistant but not long, so the LED-driver needs to be positioned close to the LED. The LED-driver also fits in the pipe.

To create a custom position between the LED's in the pipe I used a threaded rod (~ 3mm). The diameter of this rod fits the notches of the LED's.

Using small 2 nuts I clamped the LED to the rod. To also clamp the LED-driver I glued some ABS to the Diodes (which aren't used anymore) in which I draw a hole.

kOk704I.jpg

 

After putting all parts to the rod it looks like a Shaslick :-)

SJ2xk5i.jpg

The blue wires are the wires to trigger each LED's On/OFF.

The black and red are the power supply. I wired them is such way that all LED's are parallel connected, so if one LED-driver fails, the other ones still function.

(The second benefit is the fact that this way of wires requires less space).

 

This Shaslick can be slide into the pipe from the back. The front LED perfectly fits the nozzle at the front.

The last LED-driver is positioned at the end of the T-tracks. This way there is room for the electronica at the location of the ammoclip (see later on..)

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The trigger:

 

To activate all the electronics I used a DIY end-switch as trigger.

iKPFXNl.jpg

To fit this into the handle of the blaster I used a Dremel to grind the internal of the handle. 

tkVNeOA.jpg

mnhvPMr.jpg

 

As the end-switch also functions as a spring, the trigger will automatically jump back and no additional springs are required.

To prevent the trigger to fall out of place I grinded a hook at the end of the trigger as can seen below.

y9G9NFU.jpg

By using 4 nails the position of the two parts can exactly be defined. 2 nails are used to position the End-switch.

1 Nail is used as a rotation-point of the trigger and the last one defines the window of operation of the trigger (and prevents the trigger to fall out of place.

tSXSL2R.jpg

 

When everything is in, only 4 small nail tips can be seen.

B2LD7Rz.jpg

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The selector

 

As the doopydoos box contains a Selector switch I used this to create a "Mode selector".

The handle contains three letters on the side : "A", "R" and "S". This means there a 3 possible modes to select.

The angle between the 3 letters based on the location of the Selector switch  is approx. 36 degrees. This means when a 10-position rotary switch is used, the defined positions of the switch match the letters on the handle. So I bought a small 10-position rotary switch.

 

When hollowing the Selector switch, the grip of the rotary switch can be put in the Selector. As the rotary switch is originally designed to be switch using a screwdriver the top of the switch contains a slot. I glued a part of a nail into the Selector switch, so the grip of the rotary switch is fixated.

9JKAAcQ.jpg

9ytJJ5f.jpg

 

To fit the rotary switch in the handle I grinded a square hole in the handle (The depth is approx. half the thickness of the handle).

bep0BVK.jpg

As the rotary switch needs of course wires I draw a hole at the top of the handle to this square.

4SNjc8k.jpg

tkVNeOA.jpg

 

szwIBoW.jpg

 

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As I got LED's, trigger and a mode selector it is time to go digital for the first time:).

 

The rotary switch contains 5 pins : 1 input and 4 outputs.

The output pins can be seen as a binary code : 

When position 1 is selected, the first output pin is directly connected to the input.

When position 2 is selected, the second output pin is connected to the input.

At Position 3, both first and second output is connected to the input.

So:

Pos 0 = 0 0 0 0

Pos 1 = 0 0 0 1

Pos 2 = 0 0 1 0

Pos 3 = 0 0 1 1 

...

This means the rotary switch needs 4 I/O-ports on the Arduino board to determine the position of the rotary switch.

The End-switch of the trigger is just a ON/OFF switch, so only requires 1 I/O-port.

 

The digital I/O-ports of the arduino board use 5V as 1 and 0V as zero.

This means a pull-up or pull-down resistor is needed to read the trigger and switch

(see https://playground.arduino.cc/CommonTopics/PullUpDownResistor).

I my case I used pull-down resistors (10K), so when an output is connected to the input 5V is generated otherwise 0V.

As I need 5 I/O ports I also need 5 pull-down resistors.

 

Before everything can be mounted I used a breadboard to test all electronics (also buyable at Aliexpress ;)).

A1QIKul.jpg

 

So the first script I wrote is to test trigger, rotary switch and LED's.

/*
  Project "E-11 Blaster Sound/Light" by TK11131 Dutch Garrison 
  based on Project "Open Blaster" by TK8177 Italica Garrison - Preateroian Squad 

  Version 1.0 : No Sound, just LED's
 
*/

// Define Pin layout
const int PinTrigger = 2; // Trigger function
const int PinSwitch_BIT1 = 3; // Low bit of rotary switch
const int PinSwitch_BIT2 = 4; 
const int PinSwitch_BIT4 = 5;
const int PinSwitch_BIT8 = 6; // High bit of rotary switch
const int PinLED1 = 7; // Led closest to Trigger
const int PinLED2 = 8;
const int PinLED3 = 9;
const int PinLED4 = 10;
const int PinLED5 = 11; // Led at nozzle

// Define const for Firing modes
const int FireModeSingle = 1; // DigitalValue (0001)= Rotarypos 1 for Single fire mode
const int FireModeBurst = 9; // DigitalValue (1001)= Rotarypos 9 for Burst fire mode
const int BurstMode = 3; // Amout of sequence repeats on one trigger action
const int Hold_Delay = 100; // [msec] time the trigger must be pushed  before activation
const int DelayTime = 100; // [msec] delay between LEDs
const int DelayTimeEnd = 200; // [msec] duration of LED at nozzle

// Variables
int TriggerState = 0; //Reads status of Trigger
int SwitchValue = 0; // Readout of Rotary switch
int SequenceRepeats = 1; // Amount of sequences per Trigger
int PreviousState =  0; // PreviousState of Trigger
unsigned long TimeTriggerPressed; // Time at which the trigger is pressed
boolean SequenceStart = false; // Allow Sequence to Start

void setup() {
  // Setup pin modes
 pinMode(PinTrigger, INPUT);  //Trigger
 pinMode(PinSwitch_BIT1, INPUT); // Rotary Switch low Bit
 pinMode(PinSwitch_BIT2, INPUT);
 pinMode(PinSwitch_BIT4, INPUT);
 pinMode(PinSwitch_BIT8, INPUT); // Rotary switch High bit
 pinMode(PinLED1, OUTPUT); // Pin Led1 (closest at trigger)
 pinMode(PinLED2, OUTPUT);
 pinMode(PinLED3, OUTPUT);
 pinMode(PinLED4, OUTPUT);
 pinMode(PinLED5, OUTPUT); // Pin Led5 (Led at nozzle)
 
 digitalWrite(PinLED1,LOW); //Turn off led1
 digitalWrite(PinLED2,LOW); //Turn off led2
 digitalWrite(PinLED3,LOW); //Turn off led3
 digitalWrite(PinLED4,LOW); //Turn off led4
 digitalWrite(PinLED5,LOW); //Turn off led5
}

void loop() {
   
  TriggerState = digitalRead(PinTrigger); // read trigger status

  // Read out Rotary switch for Firing mode
  SequenceRepeats = 0; // Reset Fire mode to None
  SwitchValue = 0; // Reset Readout Rotary switch
  int val_SwitchValue_BIT1 = digitalRead(PinSwitch_BIT1);
  int val_SwitchValue_BIT2 = digitalRead(PinSwitch_BIT2);
  int val_SwitchValue_BIT4 = digitalRead(PinSwitch_BIT4);
  int val_SwitchValue_BIT8 = digitalRead(PinSwitch_BIT8);
  if (  val_SwitchValue_BIT1 ==  1)    { SwitchValue = SwitchValue + 1; }
  if (  val_SwitchValue_BIT2 ==  1)    { SwitchValue = SwitchValue + 2; }
  if (  val_SwitchValue_BIT4 ==  1)    { SwitchValue = SwitchValue + 4; }
  if (  val_SwitchValue_BIT8 ==  1)    { SwitchValue = SwitchValue + 8; }
  if ( SwitchValue == FireModeSingle) { SequenceRepeats = 1; }
  if ( SwitchValue == FireModeBurst)  { SequenceRepeats = BurstMode; }
  
  // Check state Trigger
  if (( TriggerState == HIGH) && (PreviousState == LOW)) { //Mark pressing moment
    SequenceStart = true;
    TimeTriggerPressed = millis();
  }

  if (( TriggerState == HIGH) && ( PreviousState == HIGH) && ( SequenceStart == true)) {
    if (( millis() - TimeTriggerPressed) >= Hold_Delay) { 
      for(int x = 0;x<SequenceRepeats; x++) {
      // play Led sequence
      digitalWrite(PinLED1,HIGH);
      delay(DelayTime);
      digitalWrite(PinLED1,LOW);
      digitalWrite(PinLED2,HIGH);
      delay(DelayTime);
      digitalWrite(PinLED2,LOW);
      digitalWrite(PinLED3,HIGH);
      delay(DelayTime);
      digitalWrite(PinLED3,LOW);
      digitalWrite(PinLED4,HIGH);
      delay(DelayTime);
      digitalWrite(PinLED4,LOW);
      digitalWrite(PinLED5,HIGH);
      delay(DelayTimeEnd);
      digitalWrite(PinLED5,LOW);
      }
      SequenceStart = false;
    }
  }
  PreviousState = TriggerState;
}

The main items of this script are:

  1. Arduino Pins 2-6 are used as input.
  2. Arduino Pins 7 - 11 are used as output for the LED's.
  3. The result pins of the rotary-switch are calculated using the binary-rules. So an integer value is generated between 0 and 9.
  4. If position 1 is selected, 1 sequence is started, if position 9 is selected 3 sequences will start (Burst mode).
  5. The trigger needs to be held at least 100 msec before it activates the LED's. This delay is used to prevent firing when you just move around.
  6. The delay time between the LED's now set on 100 msec. At the final version this delay is tuned to the length of the sound file.

As the Arduino pro Mini is not programmable using USB I bought  a FT232RL. Using this tool the Pro Mini can be connected to a computer.

0uGrCM3.jpg

 

One big imported thing that needs to be remembered : Number or mark all wires as there are going to be a lot of them.

 

Edited by Xinx
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The next part is the sound.

 

I used a WT5001 or WT2000M02 MP3-module. This module has a slot for a MicroSD-card so all MP's can be stored on the SD-card.

Specifications can be found at http://voice-chip.ru/docs/WT5001_chip_and_modules.pdf

The disadvantage of the module is the fact that the MP3's are accessed by it's location on the FAT-table (File Allocation Table). This means the MP3-files are not recognised by it's name, but the sequence on which the files are stored on the SD-card.

Example:

The first file that is saved on the SD-card is called "Sound02.mp3".

The second file that is saved is called "Sound01.mp3".

When asked to play filenumber 1, "Sound02.mp3"is played.

 

So when saving multiple files on the SD-card remember the sequence in which the files are stored.

 

The communication between the Arduino-board and the MP3-module is based on a serial-port.

This communication takes place by the TX0 and RXi pins. The TX0-pin of the Arduino needs to be connected to the RXi-pin on the MP3-module.

By using the Arduino command "serial.write()" a hexadecimal character can be send to the MP3-module.

Two main string are imported is this case:

- Setting the volume : "7E 03 A7 xx 7E" needs to be send to the MP3-module. xx needs to be replaced by a hexadecimal between 00 and 1F (0 -> 31). 1F is the highest volume as 00 will give no sound.

- Playing a MP3-file : "7E 04 A0 00 xx 7E" needs to be send to the MP3-module. xx refers to the number of the MP3-file in the FAT-table. So "01" will play the first MP3-file.

 

Besides the MP3-module I used a 5V 3W amplifier (PAM8403) which is connected to the speakers. 

 

The speakers are 20x30mm which fit perfectly in the pipe of the Doopydoos.

Ie1v3YZ.jpg

RciAVwe.jpg

 

/*
  Project "E-11 Blaster Sound/Light" by TK11131 Dutch Garrison 
  based on Project "Open Blaster" by TK8177 Italica Garrison - Preateroian Squad 

  Version 1.0b : Sound only

*/

// Define Pin layout
const int PinTrigger = 2; // Trigger function
const int Hold_Delay = 200 ; // [msec]

// Define const for Firing modes

// Variables
int TriggerState = 0; //Reads status of Trigger

int SequenceRepeats = 1; // Amount of sequences per Trigger
int PreviousState =  0; // PreviousState of Trigger
unsigned long TimeTriggerPressed; // Time at which the trigger is pressed
boolean SequenceStart = false; // Allow Sequence to Start

void setup() {
  // Setup pin modes
 pinMode(PinTrigger, INPUT);  //Trigger
 
 Serial.begin(9600); //Baudrate

    Serial.write(0x7E); 
    Serial.write(0x03); 
    Serial.write(0xA7);
    Serial.write(0x1d); //  volume (hexadecimal conversion 1-31 --> 1f = max  / 14 = medium)
    Serial.write(0x7E);
}

void loop() {
   
  TriggerState = digitalRead(PinTrigger); // read trigger status

  
  // Check state Trigger
  if (( TriggerState == HIGH) && (PreviousState == LOW)) { //Mark pressing moment
    SequenceStart = true;
    TimeTriggerPressed = millis();
  }

  if (( TriggerState == HIGH) && ( PreviousState == HIGH) && ( SequenceStart == true)) {
    if (( millis() - TimeTriggerPressed) >= Hold_Delay) { 
      for(int x = 0;x<SequenceRepeats; x++) {
        Serial.write(0x7E); 
        Serial.write(0x04); 
        Serial.write(0xA0); // A0 for SD card
        Serial.write(0x00);
        Serial.write(0x01); // track number
        Serial.write(0x7E);
      }
      SequenceStart = false;
    }
  }
  PreviousState = TriggerState;
}

The code above I used for testing the sound module.

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Great updates Pawel. It's been extremely insightful to see how you've incorporated your electronics to the doopydoos resin kit. Notably, the install of the trigger switch and the selector switch has been very helpful for me to ponder on. The code is also helpful to understand the intricacies of the circuitry. Cheers! keep going and following :D

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The last part of electronics that I used is a 0.66"OLED-display. There are two versions in the marktet : I2C or SPI-protocol. 

The I2C-protocol uses 4 pins as the SPI-protocol requires 7 pins. As  there will be a lot of wiring in my project I used the I2C-protocol.

This protocol uses the SCL /SDA pins. On the Arduino pro mini these pins are not located at the outside of the board, but near mean processor : See http://pighixxx.com/prominiv3_0.pdf

These pins are also knowns as A4 and A5.

Besides the SCL/SDA-pins the OLED-display requires a 5V and ground-signal.

 

Until now all the programming of the Arduino is done without any additional libraries. Fot the OLED-display however a driver is required.

As mentioned before this driver can be found at  https://github.com/sparkfun/Micro_OLED_Breakout/tree/V_1.0/Libraries/Arduino.

 

To incorporate this driver into the project <wire.h> and <SFE_MicroOLED.h> needs to be included.

#include <Wire.h>  // Include Wire if you're using I2C
#include <SFE_MicroOLED.h>  // Include the SFE_MicroOLED library
#define DC_JUMPER 0
#define PIN_RESET 13 // Set reset pin to pin 13 (Not connected to OLED (so useless, but needs to be defined) and only pin that it not used
MicroOLED oled(PIN_RESET, DC_JUMPER); // I2C declaration

The script above defines an object called "oled". This object controls the OLED-display. As the OLED-driver requires a reset-pin, this needs to be defined. There is however no direct connection to the display, but it is still required. As I used all pins for I/O on the Arduino Pro mini the only Pin left is Pin13 (onboard LED). So I defined this pin as reset pin.

 

One this to remember is that the refreshment rate of the OLED is quite low and uses a lot of processing time. This means when the OLED is being refreshed all functions of the Arduino will be on hold.

 

Below is a test-script which will display a bitmap on the OLED-screen.

#include <wire.h>
#include <SFE_MicroOLED.h>  // Include the SFE_MicroOLED library

#define PIN_RESET 13  // Connect RST to pin 13
#define DC_JUMPER 0

MicroOLED oled(PIN_RESET, DC_JUMPER); // Example I2C declaration

uint8_t testBitmap [] = {
0x00, 0x38, 0x7C, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x44, 0x7C, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x80, 0x40, 0x20, 0x20, 0x10, 0x08, 0x08, 0x04, 0x04, 0x04, 0x02, 0x02, 0x02, 0x82, 0x82, 0x92,
0xFE, 0x92, 0x82, 0x82, 0x02, 0x02, 0x02, 0x04, 0x04, 0x04, 0x08, 0x08, 0x10, 0x30, 0x20, 0x40,
0x80, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x02, 0x02, 0x02, 0x02, 0xFE, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x88, 0x68, 0x38, 0x18, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x80, 0x60, 0x18, 0x0C, 0x02, 0x01,
0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x08, 0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80, 0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0x40, 0x20, 0x20, 0x10, 0x14,
0xFF, 0x14, 0x10, 0x20, 0x20, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80, 0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0x20, 0x10, 0x08, 0x04, 0x02,
0x01, 0x01, 0x02, 0x0C, 0x18, 0x60, 0x80, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0xFF, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x36, 0x94, 0x14, 0xB6, 0x22, 0x22, 0x00, 0xFC, 0x03, 0x80, 0x00, 0x00, 0xE0, 0x00,
0x00, 0x80, 0x00, 0x00, 0xC0, 0x38, 0x04, 0x02, 0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0x20,
0x3F, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01, 0x02, 0x04, 0x38, 0xC0, 0x00, 0x00, 0x80,
0x00, 0x00, 0xE0, 0x00, 0x00, 0x80, 0x03, 0xFC, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0xFF, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0xE7, 0x0C, 0x27, 0x21, 0xE7, 0x2C, 0x00, 0x7F, 0x81, 0x03, 0x01, 0x01, 0x0F, 0x01,
0x01, 0x03, 0x01, 0x01, 0x07, 0x39, 0x41, 0x81, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x03, 0x04, 0x08,
0xF9, 0x08, 0x04, 0x03, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0x81, 0x41, 0x39, 0x07, 0x01, 0x01, 0x03,
0x01, 0x01, 0x0F, 0x01, 0x01, 0x03, 0x81, 0x7F, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01, 0x01, 0x01, 0xFF, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x1B, 0x22, 0x42, 0x23, 0x18, 0x7C, 0x00, 0x00, 0x03, 0x0C, 0x30, 0x60, 0x80, 0x00,
0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0x20, 0x10, 0x08, 0x04, 0x03, 0x02, 0x02, 0x04, 0x08, 0x08, 0x08, 0x10, 0x90,
0xFF, 0x90, 0x10, 0x08, 0x08, 0x08, 0x04, 0x02, 0x02, 0x03, 0x04, 0x08, 0x10, 0x20, 0x40, 0x80,
0x00, 0x00, 0x80, 0x40, 0x30, 0x0C, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0xFF, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01,
0x03, 0x04, 0x08, 0x18, 0x10, 0x20, 0x20, 0x40, 0x40, 0x40, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x84, 0x84, 0x24,
0xFF, 0x24, 0x84, 0x84, 0x80, 0x80, 0x80, 0x40, 0x40, 0x40, 0x20, 0x20, 0x10, 0x10, 0x08, 0x04,
0x03, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x40, 0x40, 0x40, 0x40, 0x7F, 0x00
};


void setup()
{
  // Before you can start using the OLED, call begin() to init
  // all of the pins and configure the OLED.
  oled.begin();
  // clear(ALL) will clear out the OLED's graphic memory.
  // clear(PAGE) will clear the Arduino's display buffer.
  oled.clear(ALL);  // Clear the display's memory (gets rid of artifacts)
  // To actually draw anything on the display, you must call the
  // display() function. 
  oled.display();   
  delay(2000);//pause for the splash screen
  
  oled.clear(PAGE);//clear the screen before we draw our image
  oled.drawBitmap(testBitmap);//call the drawBitmap function and pass it the array from above
  oled.display();//display the imgae 
}

void loop()
{
}

 

The driver I used is made by SparkFun. So when the OLED is being booted, the SparkFun-logo will appear.

As I make an imperial blaster I wanted it to boot with the imperial logo instead. So I modified the maincode of the driver.

Looking at the SFE_MicroOLED.cpp file, there is a local variable called "screenmemory []". This variable contains a array which contains the default boot logo.

 

Using some paintprogramma I created a 64x48 bitmap containing a Black/White image of the imperial logo.

On the internet is a program called "LCD Assistant" which converts a bitmap into c-code.

It can be found at http://en.radzio.dxp.pl/bitmap_converter/

 

Using this program my bitmap was converted to a small cpp-script which contains the declaration of a array the same size a "screenmemory[]" in the OLED-driver.

By simply replacing the content of the variable the bootlogo became Imperial B)

static uint8_t screenmemory [] = {
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x00, 0x80, 0xC0, 0xE0, 0xE0, 0x70, 0x78, 0x38, 0x1C, 0x1C, 0x1C, 0x0C, 0xCE, 0xEE, 0xEE, 0xFE,
0xFE, 0xFE, 0xFE, 0xEE, 0xEE, 0xCE, 0x4C, 0x1C, 0x1C, 0x38, 0x38, 0x78, 0x70, 0xE0, 0xE0, 0xC0,
0x80, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0xE0, 0xF0, 0xFC, 0xFE,
0xFF, 0xF7, 0xF3, 0xF9, 0xFC, 0xF8, 0x78, 0xFC, 0xFC, 0xFE, 0xFE, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x83,
0x03, 0x03, 0x03, 0xF7, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFE, 0xFE, 0xFC, 0xFC, 0x78, 0xF8, 0xF8, 0xF9, 0xF3,
0xF7, 0xFF, 0xFE, 0xFC, 0xF0, 0xE0, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0xF8, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x07, 0x00, 0x0F,
0xCF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFB, 0xF0, 0xF0, 0xF0, 0xE0, 0xE1, 0x03, 0x07, 0x03, 0x01, 0x01, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x01, 0x01, 0x03, 0x07, 0x03, 0xE3, 0xE1, 0xE0, 0xF0, 0xF0, 0xF3, 0xFF, 0xFF,
0xFF, 0xDF, 0x0F, 0x00, 0x07, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xF8, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x1F, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xE0, 0x00, 0xF0,
0xFB, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xCF, 0x0F, 0x0F, 0x07, 0x87, 0xC3, 0xE0, 0xE0, 0xC0, 0x80, 0x80, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x80, 0x80, 0xC0, 0xC0, 0xE0, 0xC0, 0x87, 0x87, 0x07, 0x0F, 0x0F, 0xDF, 0xFF, 0xFF,
0xFF, 0xF1, 0xF0, 0x00, 0xE0, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x1F, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x07, 0x0F, 0x3F, 0x7F,
0xFF, 0xE7, 0xCF, 0x9F, 0x1F, 0x0F, 0x1E, 0x3F, 0x3F, 0x7F, 0x7F, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xEF, 0xC0,
0xC0, 0xC0, 0xC1, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0xFF, 0x7F, 0x7F, 0x3F, 0x3F, 0x1E, 0x1F, 0x3F, 0x9F, 0xCF,
0xE7, 0xFF, 0x7F, 0x3F, 0x0F, 0x03, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00,
0x00, 0x01, 0x03, 0x07, 0x07, 0x0E, 0x1E, 0x1C, 0x3C, 0x38, 0x38, 0x72, 0x73, 0x73, 0x77, 0x7F,
0x7F, 0x7F, 0x7F, 0x77, 0x73, 0x73, 0x78, 0x38, 0x38, 0x3C, 0x1C, 0x1E, 0x0E, 0x07, 0x07, 0x03,
0x01, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00, 0x00};

gmsF5JN.jpg 

 

As the display of the OLED-display is Black/White and the scope should be Red/Black I used a filter to change the colors.

When my son was not looking I took his old 3D-glasses and unmounted the red-foil.;)

UOjgSKA.jpg

 

The display looks a lot cooler when this cheap filter is applied. NB : The image shown on the display is also a customised bitmap.

popnI5v.jpg

 

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This is really cool and shaping up well.

 

I created a product called BlastFX earlier in the year that is available as kit, and can be coupled with an animated mini display. More information is here: https://facebook.com/story.php?story_fbid=1753634708009867&id=964476920258987

 

What you've done here is not far off what I did, including the logo at start up and site display.

 

Would love to see a video of yours working?

 

 

 

 

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By combining all previous scripts I created my main script.

As I didn't want a static display I added some animation to it.

This animation is a simply display of lines and rectangles.

Herefore I used the functions  "oled.line" and "oled.rect".

After adding these lines to the code. The function "oled.display()" needs to be called to show all additions to the screen.

As adding bitmaps to the screen isn't supported by the driver I customised one of the default fonts to be able to print Aurebesh characters.

 

Therefore I created a font of 6x5 pixels and added it to the driver.

The fonts are based on an array which contains an index of the content of the array. After this index, all lines of the characters are defined.

See below.

// Aurebesh 6x5 font
static const unsigned char font6x5[] PROGMEM = {
	// first row defines - FONTWIDTH, FONTHEIGHT, ASCII START CHAR, TOTAL CHARACTERS, FONT MAP WIDTH HIGH, FONT MAP WIDTH LOW (2,56 meaning 256)
	6,6,65,26,1,56,
	0x1B, 0x0A, 0x0A, 0x1B, 0x11, 0x11,
	0x0A, 0x11, 0x15, 0x15, 0x11, 0x0A,
	0x07, 0x00, 0x04, 0x00, 0x1C, 0x00,
	0x00, 0x15, 0x0D, 0x07, 0x03, 0x00,
	0x06, 0x08, 0x10, 0x08, 0x06, 0x1F,
	0x1C, 0x14, 0x1F, 0x14, 0x16, 0x12,
	0x1F, 0x10, 0x11, 0x19, 0x07, 0x01,
	0x11, 0x15, 0x15, 0x15, 0x15, 0x11,
	0x00, 0x00, 0x02, 0x1F, 0x00, 0x00,
	0x14, 0x14, 0x12, 0x0E, 0x03, 0x00,
	0x11, 0x11, 0x11, 0x11, 0x11, 0x1F,
	0x00, 0x04, 0x08, 0x08, 0x1F, 0x00,
	0x00, 0x18, 0x16, 0x11, 0x11, 0x00,
	0x0E, 0x11, 0x0C, 0x03, 0x0C, 0x10,
	0x08, 0x16, 0x11, 0x11, 0x16, 0x08,
	0x0E, 0x11, 0x11, 0x10, 0x1F, 0x00,
	0x1F, 0x11, 0x11, 0x01, 0x01, 0x07,
	0x00, 0x11, 0x0D, 0x07, 0x03, 0x00,
	0x09, 0x1A, 0x14, 0x08, 0x10, 0x1F,
	0x08, 0x10, 0x1F, 0x10, 0x08, 0x00,
	0x1F, 0x10, 0x10, 0x12, 0x11, 0x1F,
	0x01, 0x02, 0x1C, 0x02, 0x01, 0x00,
	0x1F, 0x11, 0x11, 0x11, 0x11, 0x1F,
	0x08, 0x16, 0x11, 0x16, 0x08, 0x00,
	0x03, 0x0D, 0x10, 0x0C, 0x03, 0x00,
	0x18, 0x14, 0x12, 0x12, 0x12, 0x1F
	};
#endif // FONT6X5_H

This way I can use the function "oled.print" to display Aurebesh Characters. 

oled.setFontType(1);  // Set font to type 1 (My Aurebesh font :-))
oled.setCursor(10, 23); // Location where to start printing
oled.print("LOCKED"); // Write the text

 

How cool is that:peace:

 

The complete font looks like : 

5weUQbZ.jpg

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To give an impression of the complete functionality of my script, I recorded the video below.

[As I don't know how to show a video I just copied the link. Hopefully this works]

http://vimeo.com/232666628

 

The numbers in the under left corner are debugging number which I used to verify the functionality of the swith, MP3-player and trigger.

In the final version I deleted this debug-code.

Edited by Xinx
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As all electronics work, all that needs to be done is .... putting it in the doopydoos kit.  This was quit a complex puzzle, but I managed to solve it.:)

 

I used two 9V batteries to supply all electronics. (Don't know if it is necessary, but this way I split the power consumption in two). 

1 is used for the arduino, MP3-player, OLED-screen, the other one for the amplifier/speakers and the 5 LED's.

 

So there needs to be space for 2 9V batteries in the doopydoos, which needs to be replaceable.

The first one I put into the ammoclip.

rNwN9uV.jpg

 

Therefor I hollowed the ammoclip and "clipholder" using a dremel. The main part of the battery is put in the ammoclip as far (or deep) as possible.

MCr4RhT.jpg

 

As these are 2 separate parts I added a rare earth magnet to hold the two pieces together. This way the parts stay together during trooping as the battery might not be able to hold them together.

tnuehph.jpg

 

When both parts are put together you cannot see what secrets lay beneath the surface.

When the battery is put as deep as possible in the ammoclip there is approx. 1 cm of room left at the end of the battery. This space is used later on.

kAeB7qr.jpg

 

 

 

 

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The second battery is stored at the end of the doopydoos pipe. This is nicely sealed by the end cap.

To be able to put a 9V battery at this location there needs to be additional space.

Therefor I used the dremel again and created a rectangle shaped box.

la3e8Kh.jpg

WfUTCNb.jpg

 

This way the battery fits perfectly.

j3tPqN5.jpg

 

However: The colour of the pipe will be black, but the colour of most batteries isn't. So the battery needs to be painted or covert somehow.

I  have chosen to cover the battery. I used a thin metal sheet which I painted black. This sheet is bend around the battery.

cgzVv9z.jpg

zQqQ99e.jpg

 

After creating the right shape I glued this metal sheet into the pipe.

(I did this at the final stages of my project as this will block the entrance of the back of the pipe : The speaker needs to be put in first ). 

To give an impression of this solution the final back end looks like the picture below.

This picture is taken using a flash, in real life it is almost unnoticeable.

RciAVwe.jpg

 

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Next part is positioning the OLED-screen in the scope.

To create the illusion of a "real" scope I bought a small outdoor monocular telescope 8x20 (yeah.. from aliexpress).

This scoop contains different lenses which perfectly fit into the E-11 scope.

df2eVQG.jpg

 

After dismantling this scope I retrieved three lenses:

AdabXUu.jpg

 

These lenses I used at the front of the scope as well as the back. 

 

To create space in the scope I used a size 22 wood-drill and drill approx. 4 cm deep.

PqHWkma.jpg

1SQ88OY.jpg

 

To create space for the wires i drilled a small hole in one the support blocks.

r2UfE9T.jpg

 

Of course I also drilled a hole in the front to place one of the small lenses.

esvR2OM.jpg

 

As I was in the mood of drilling I drilles three little holes to replace the resin screws for real ones.

aOPr1hq.jpg

 

 

 

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Next part is the OLED itself.

As the complete Printboard does not fit into the scope, the screen has to be separated from this board.

(As I bought multiple OLED I sacrificed  one to figure out how to separate it without damaging it).

Luckily the OLED is mounted to the printboard using double side tape and are no functional parts beneath the OLED.

So using a knife and carefully move it between the OLED and printboard, the OLED can be seperated.

5tk3VVV.jpg

 

After removing the 4 pins at the printboard, the size also decreases a bit.

To keep the OLED straight, I made a little square in the hole I drilled. This means I made some additional corners in the scope at the location where the OLED should be positioned.

1SQ88OY.jpg?1

This way the scope cannot fall into the hole. And because of the glued lense it cannot fall out either.

 

To create the red colour I glued the piece of plastic I described earlier onto the OLED-screen.  After getting it all in, is looks like the image below :

YcxqBzn.jpg

 

After the lens is glued it looks like :

HpaQfz7.jpg

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As the wires of the OLED needs to go into the pipe I drilled a little hole in the pipe, just beside the Hengstler counter.

I also made an hole in the metal part on which the hengstler counter and scope are mounted on.

Hc8H3j8.jpg

 

When it all is mounted, the wires are almost invisible (black, and close to the hengstler-counter).

RjbwINF.jpg

 

 

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This is by far one of the best blaster builds with electronics that I have seen since ages... Biggest respect, Pawel! :duim:

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I agree with Tino - the photos and explanations are excellent! I am getting more familiar with how to install blaster electronics! You've been a huge help Pawel, cheers to you!

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The next part of this project is getting the electonics (PBA's) in the pipe.

As I used two PBA's which are to big to fit into the pipe (As it is full with other stuff;)), I made some space underneath the ammoclip.

Fe3eiAb.jpg

This marked square fits perfectly inside the ammoclip so there will be a big space between the battery and the other side of the pipe.

rugbAmI.jpg

hzyp7UE.jpg

 

To be able to position the PBA's I also cut the inner bolt.

EiW4CoH.jpg

HMDAmSV.jpg

As this inner bolt needs to be replaced by something else, I needed some reference of the depth. Inside the Doopydoos pipe is a black plastic core.

I used the outside of this core as reference of the depth.

 

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