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Easy

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About Easy

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    Corporal

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  • Name
    Dave
  • 501st Unit
    Not approved yet

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  1. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    I will with the front strips only because the raised area will be 20mm, so that’s all that will fit on the inner channel. I will probably use the 40mm sections I cut off the outer thigh shell front as an inside strip on the rear of the thighs. It’s for strength so the more surface area the more grabbing power. Generally I don’t worry about the inner size as long as it’s not too small.
  2. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    I like the idea of the strength but I’ve seen many pictures of the return edges broken with large chunks missing. I’m toying with an idea to make a laminated trim piece that will replace the return edge, perhaps two layers of the material I’m trimming off. A 1/4” high 2 layer laminated piece would give it a look of thicker armour and be much stronger than the natural return edge. It would require some cutting, bending and gluing but I think the results would be worth it. My only real question is the order of the steps from start to finish. I’m leaning toward one layer at a time with overlapping seams on the layers. I didn’t destroy the return edges that I removed so I may start by using those.
  3. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    After a couple discussions I decided to trim off all the return edges on the lower ends but on the shin pieces I’ll definitely have some return edge remaining. I like the heavier look. It’s not really seen at the bottom unless someone is laying down to look. Hoping to avoid some armour bites as well.
  4. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    Ok, time to start on the leg armour. I’ll be starting on the thighs. The shins are going to get some special work done so I’ll do a whole section on them after. Here we go… These are the AM thigh pieces un touched as they came. They are huge. Look at the width of the back. I like that they don’t have vac-formed ridges to fight. This will allow any amount of trimming to customize right to my leg because the cut won’t have to follow the edge line or cross over a raised area. The front has the raised area and it’s huge. Hat. Will do here is find the right amount to trim off…an even strip in line with the raised edge…and then do a rough fit to estimate the rear side cut. It may or may not be cut square with the edge, we’ll see. Look at the girth on these. For all the bigger troopers out there this is the armour to buy. You can almost park a land-speeder in that. Here is the total raised front width. 100mm. I’ll find the right amount to trim off each so that the cover strip is centred on it. I used a pencil to trace the inner corner of the return edges then scored along it a few medium passes. The pencil line really helps because, believe it or no, the inner corner disappears in light and shadow when you look at it. The defined line makes cutting simple. Nice and neat, ready to sand smooth. You can can see the top return edge is gone as well. Because the thigh pieces are huge…around and tall…I might have to trim the top for movement, spacing or both. When they are how I want them I can use my heat gun to soften the top edge and ‘curl’ it inward slightly to give it some depth…up to 1/8”. With a quick test fit and a couple pencil marks I estimated the fron raised edge should be 30mm left on each side. I taped the halves together on those marks. It’s a nice straight line top to bottom. Another quick fit and I estimated the rear areas to mark, taped them and tried it on. It fit really nice. You can see how the back will not be right in line with the edge. Much more is coming off the bottom then the top. Again this is a rough estimate of the back. Here is where I notice something I didn’t like. The outer cover strips for thighs should be 20mm. I used some ABS from the bicep trimming to mock up a strip. Then I drew lines to see how it would look with a 60mm raised area. YUCK! I’m tall but not terribly wide so I really don’t need that much area to cover my thigh. The raised area is 60mm so I drew lines at 20mm spacing. With the mock shim clamped on I can see that 10mm on each side isn’t too bad. I could cut 40mm off one to leave 20mm… and 20mm off the other to leave 20mm for a total of 40mm. I used the mock strip to mark down the inside because it’s easier to use the strip as a pencil guide and just slide it down the channel. Before I cut these I’m going to try marking and setting the front at 30mm. With any luck I can eliminate all or most of the raised area beyond the cover strip edges. Marking the left thigh with the mock strip on the inside. Sliding it along the inner ridge makes a perfect line all the way along. Ready to trim. With the both sides trimmed to 20mm I put them together by overlapping them. Don’t panic, this is for test fitting. I taped the back sides the way they were lined up before and pulled them back on for a fitting they felt great like this so the next step is to mark the rear cut lines to as close to the center of the hamstring as I can and trim them. I’ll trim 10mm off each raised edge on the front and a cover strip will cover all of it and have clean butt joints on the back. Victor Matts at AM contacted me before shipping and asked if I’d like the knee ammo/battery belt bent to roughly the correct shape. It’s so close to perfect that I’ll only need a slight adjustment. That’s customer care folks. So back down I go the next day and cut 10mm off each raised edge on he right thigh. This is how it looks just taped together. That’s gorgeous. Below are the strips I cut off. Here I have the mock cover strip taps on so,I can see how well the fit is. It’s going to look perfect, the raised edge with a strip on top really adds character. This is a 20mm trimmed edge from one of the previous cuts. I trimmed another 2-3mm off so it will sit flat in the channel. I like using the trimmed pieces as inner support strips because they fit so nicely. The channel is the same depth as the thickness of the strip so I’ll have no raised edge inside to rub my leg when trooping. Ok everybody flip…good job on this pic, no? This is the inner strip trimmed to 17mm. You can see the deflection below the tape measure, it goes to 18mm even farther along. I’m not overly picky about the inside as it’s not going to be seen all that much, but when it is seen it will show the human touch as opposed to precise machining…my personal taste. Here’s why I really like using trimmed off material on the pieces they came from. They have the natural shape and curvature of it. Setting these in place is easier than strongarming flat pieces in and less stressful on the armour. That’s exactly what adding strength should do. A bead of E6000…I found white E6000…and a pile of clamps to set the inner strip in. A view of the outside. All clamps are in place to apply the force in the right places. Close up. If the gluing process shifts the strip outward, or if it’s too far out and causes a gap between the halves, it can be sanded or trimmed to fit. Next day. The first inner strip is set so I glued the outer and inner halves together. It’s a bit awkward trying to mate them with the glue on and secure them in place. A couple clamps to start with, then I used tape to keep them set once aligned and lots of magnets to clamp them evenly mated while drying. I trimmed the left thigh raised sections to 10mm each. The inner strip on the left leg outer half is glued and setting up now too. Tomorrow I’ll repeat the process and mate the inner half.
  5. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    Thanks. I’m hoping this build goes well enough to meet centurion standards and will benefit future builders. Detail is very important to new guys like me. This will chronicle the build through it’s entirety. My goal is to be submitted and approved before the August FanExpo in Toronto this year. At at some point I’d like to get together with a member from my area and demonstrate that help is not just in these forum pages but available with accomplished builders in hands on situations.
  6. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    I’m trimming the return edges to about 1/8” later, maybe a little more depending on how they fit or if they bite.
  7. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    Continuing with the arms, this is the right forearm with the final trim lines marked. I put the undersuit arm on and did a quick fit to see how much I could take off. There will be about 1/8” left as a return edge. I’ll likely fill the gap with ABS paste I have on hand. Made a 15mm cover strip for the outer forearm. Just having a look because…well because I just want to. Something I do before gluing is rough up the gluing area with a couple passes of the sandpaper. It makes a little better bonding surface. Time for some bicep sculpting. With a little help I did a quick fit and mark for cutting. The AM Armour is plenty deep…Dwayne the Rock Johnson might not need to trim it…and it’s proportional to the arm. Even cuts off every edge and another quick fit and they’re ready for inner strips and glue. I made the inner strips from the cut pieces. Gluing them on to one half first makes it much easier to set and glue the other half. This is the nice surface to set the other half This is why I like the inner strips. When the pieces are glued together after trimming they don’t always line up square the way they came. When this dries I’ll pull the pieces together, glue and clamp them to set up. The inner trip will add strength to areas that are naturally somewhat stressed. Here it is with the inner strips holding. The back half is trimmed and the other half will be trimmed to match. Sanding will finish it if needed. Time to start the right side. Again the inner strips on one side first…the back half this time because I can. Once the inner strips cured enough on the remaining bicep and forearm I glued the halves together. This pic is of the final edges being joined. The bicep was very easy and needed only normal clamping to set the edges straight and even. The forearm was a bit tougher to bring together. I preset a strap with clamps to set it up. Once set I removed the clamps and slid the strap down to open the arm up. I carefully applied some e6000 to the strip and slid the strap back into place then clamped it. There was a couple uneven edges so I added the magnets (2 sets of 4in/4out) to set it right. Time to let it dry. I’ll make the rest of the 15mm cover strips while it cures. Notice the wrist end of the finished forearm in the pic. Some trimming and smoothing will be required. I’ll do this once I’m ready to test fit with at least the chest and back armour assembled. I’ll know better then how much wrist clearance I’ll need for decent movement and minimal gap between the parts. Here are all the parts glued and set with inner strips, and one outer because I just had to see it. Got a little first order supervision happening. The left forearm looks like a pretty straight tube but it’s not really. The red on the wrist is not blood. It’s marker I used to make trim lines. I trimmed the left wrist back flush now because it at a good length for my arm as it is. This arm will be the most extended which the blaster so I’m hoping to cover the arm with minimal gaps between the sections. The cover strip didn’t seat as nicely as I’d like. There were noticeable glue bubbles showing under the edge. I ran a bead of white E6000 down that edge to fill it in and tidy it up. E6000 grabs dirt and really stands out so if this dries as nice as I hope for I’ll put a little white paint over it to seal it. 15mm cover strips ready for the left forearm. It’s fun how plans change. I was going to leave the cover strips until later but I just can’t get over how strong the one I did is. Notice the clamp on the right arm. I wasn’t happy with the way the glue set at the wrist. The halves weren’t flush at the but joint so I pulled them apart slightly, about 2” up the arm, and removed some glue. (This is where the benefits of E6000 are evident…it’s easy to work with and redo,if you’re not happy with your work). I squeezed some new glue in and clamped it. Should be better tomorrow. One strip glued on. Again the magnets set it squarely down. Both strips glued, clamped and set with magnets. Heres a close up view of how the magnets really pull it together. I had to put this pic in because you can really see the quality of the AM kit. The surface is like a mirror. Bicep cover strips, 15mm, are ready for when the forearms are done curing. So these came today. From PropsEmporium in England. A bit tight on these big hands but they work. Nice surprise that they came ready to wear. The left forearm is done. Both cover strips are on. The strength that inner and outer cover strips add is incredible. The right forearm has only one outer strip on and it has much more flex with a squeeze. Last strip for the right forearm. Lots of clamping power to keep it on the contour. Left bicep gets the outer cover strips. I should have shown this earlier but I just didn’t occur to me until just now. The marks you see there are to center the strip when the clamp is on. You can’t really see if it’s centred with the clamp on it so I use the strip to mark each end and adjust it if needed with the clamp in place. All pieces glued and drying. A view from the Death Star. All return edges will be trimmed later. Once these are ready I’ll move on to the leg armour.
  8. I adjusted my brow, not as easy as I’d hoped. I raised it to 5mm. I personally don’t like it as much but it still looks very cool. This is an AM ARMOR bucket. I was careful to rake the ears correctly when I started. I do need a new brow trim now though…little slip with the knife. Saved my finger though, the force was with me.
  9. Here’s some interesting troopers from ANH. Gaps and open biceps, and the one on the far right that’s not circled is obvious as well. A bit hardline to ‘Forbid’ accurate armour. As stated by others here, we are not all built the same. Our armour is a reflexion of us as individuals as much as it is a reflection of our screen heroes…troopers are heroes too…and that hardline position would mostly serve to ostracize those who don’t naturally conform to the parameters set by Mr. Lucas during filming. He had the luxury of screening to fit his needs. We, as individuals, don’t. We are a community of equals in odd sizes and shapes. I’ve read the posts through this thread and, much to my dismay, have to agree with the intent and reasons for the changes. Since my lid has a low brow and is not yet approved I will need to alter it to meet the L3 requirement. Fortunately it’s just the brow for me, a slight trimming should fix it. For those who have, or are just about to, submit for centurion it may be a crushing blow after countless hours of dedication to a build based on the old standards and acceptabilities. It may be prudent to inform everyone who receives the newsletters that submissions after the next newsletter will be subject to the updated CRL amendments. I only found this because I was looking for information on correct return edges.
  10. There will always be those who critique every millimeter of a suit…and everything else…to death. “Screen accurate” is ideal, but to which stormtrooper in all the footage to we emulate? We’ve all seen the perfect standing still armour shots, the open calf armour during action shots, at least one had no brow trim, various gaps in brow trim and so on and so on. The word ‘Ideally’ is by far the most fair wording in some cases. Some will always strive and achieve the absolute pinnacle of perfection and others will only ever be able to get close. This is is a suggestion, from other examples I’ve encountered such as martial arts, and by no means am I trying to step on toes: Perhaps it it would be acceptable to incorporate levels, or degrees, to the centurion level. L1, L2, L3 so to speak. Just a thought.
  11. Easy

    Digz Graavz First Build - ANH Stunt from AP

    I’m getting a custom neck seal made by Geeky Pink’s Phantastic Gaskets. You can FB search that and message her. Im going back and forth between a two piece under armour suit or another one piece.
  12. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    Starting work on the limbs. First is a forearm. There are two distinctly different forearms. Not sure which is left or right. The difference is one is slightly longer with a deeper cut into the inner forearm piece. I’m told they are interchangeable so, based on movie stills, I’ve decided to use this piece on the trigger arm. It will be my right arm piece. The reason is that this arm will generally be bent farther when holding the blaster so ideally for comfort. So this will be the left forearm. I matched the left and right inners with their outers, trimmed off the lower return edges and did a fitting on my bare arm. I marked the inner forearm for trimming. Only the inner pieces will get trimmed because the outer pieces came trimmed properly. I marked the cut lines with a pencil and made the first cut…oh me nerves…which is the edge that will be on top and the straightest cut. The second cut cut is on an angle that will give the forearm the taper it needs to fit the arm nicely. After the first cut I taped the cut edge to the outer arm and fit it again. You can see the old line has been replaced with one that works better. I use the aluminum ruler to score straight lines. A few passes with the blade then I snap it nice and cleanly. I usually do some light passes in the groove just to make it a nicely trimmed edge. I use tape and magnets to set it up and try it on. You can see the trimmed edges and the taper. I line up the return edge end, at the elbow, and will trim the wrist end for a nice smooth line around. I’ll be using inner and outer strips to complete it. The cuts are really straight and mate nicely with the outer arm. No sanding has been done to the cut edges. Notice the stack of magnets on the left…it picked up a screw bit as I moved it across the table. The bit was still there from the bucket build. Put your stuff away when you’re done with it folks. It’s neater, you won’t likely lose stuff or damage stuff. Left forearm trimming and fitting. First the wrist end return edge goes. Again a quick fit and marking for the sizing cuts. Here we can see the difference in the two forearms. Right forearm has a slight taper at the top. Left has a fairly straight, 90 edge at the top. From Victor Matts, maker of this armour, of AM Armor: The right forearm tapers at the top as this allows the right arm to be bend more easily when carrying a blaster, while the left arm extends more straight, holding the barrel of the blaster farther away from the body. The strips run up the top and bottom of the arm so this cut should run this line. With the cuts made an the halves taped I did a test fit. Everything lines up nice and it’s ready for the inner and outer cover strips. Some troopers only use outer strips but I like the strength the inner strips add. The first inner strip ready to be glued in. I applied E6000 to the strip and secured it with clamps at the ends and these very strong magnets in the middle. Inside view. I doubled the magnets inside for better pullin power. The strip will seat perfectly flat to both halves. I’ll be doing inside strips only to start with to form the pieces. The outer strips will go on once I’m satisfied with the final fit.
  13. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    Here it is. Outside is done. I was told that it’s not symmetrical and I can clearly see that. The imperfections add personality.
  14. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    Decided to paint the inside of the bucket. This is the first coat. Yes it’s a brush on not a spray. It’s called Gun Metal. The second coat really looks like I want it. Most will be covered with padding and fans etc. but it will look great when done. May as well do the Hovi mic’s. Mics drying and screens ready.
  15. Easy

    ANH STUNT BUILD

    Got some new paint brushes from Santa…and a bottle of 40 Creek. Shall we begin? I masked off the ears for paint. Looks pretty good good so far. I started here then the teeth after. It’s a good idea to do a coat then let it set up for a while then do another coat…then let it dry. I know this because I didn’t do that. I think I did a pretty good job on the teeth. Starting to look like a trooper. I also redid the side vent stripes. I’m happier with them but still might do them again. The vocoder looks ok. Will do some touch-ups on it after it dries a bit. While doing the vocoder I pawed up the teeth and ears that weren’t yet dry. Patience. It’s been preached every step of the way and it’s necessary. Lesson learned. The unmasked ear. I painted the screws white, all flat heads now, and touched up the areas that bled into the masking. Here you can see the results of impatience. The black went on too soon and the grey bled through. I’ll fix it later. I ordered some helmet padding on amazon. My plan is to paint the inside of the bucket black. I’m also going to try to make some custom covers for the inside screws and nuts if the padding doesn’t cover themaqa. I’m tossing around the ABS paste mould idea or a heat and press to fit ABS cap. Also still tossing around the idea of painting the tears and traps. The stickers look good but paint has a feel I like when I touch it…and it just seems to look a bit nicer.
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