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ireachy

Celebration Europe 2016 Rogue One Stormtrooper Back Pack Build

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3mm tube, od 5mm, basically impossible to get through eyelets with out breaking

 

 

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d5370341805275a159c115231ad214d1.jpg

 

Used canola oil to get it through, carefully, it drags off a skin, so tube needed cleaning often

 

 

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c8ebb9df98e1c94191eec1ac9817f54e.jpg

 

So the tubing eased through next two eyelets, my no 3 eyelet created many breakages, this was difficult but careful patience prevailed

 

 

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Cut the end of the tube into a tapered point. Thread it like a needle. You do not need to use oil. Thread the end through, stretch thinner and pull it through. Be careful not to put too much stress on the guides as they may snap off if bent.

DSC_0479_zpskuipyxzn.jpg
Edited by mr paul

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On the subject of antenna tubes. I have reverted back to my initial sizing for the outer diameter of the tube. The spacing in-between the tube as it wraps around the rod appears equal to the width of the tube itself. I find it impossible to achieve this spacing with a 5mm OD tube. My original estimate of the tube width was 6mm OD. A 6mm tube wraps around the rod 13 times and allows for the equal spacing in between. However this time around I have gone for a 6mm silicone/latex surgical tube as opposed to silicone/latex air hose.

Wrap%20zoom_zpsxyu6hasd.jpg

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Not sure how people are squeezing tubing through the fishing rod eyelets easily, in my case, using the 3mm/5mm, threaded like a needle etc, at least 2 eyelets caused such issues that snapping of the tubing was often, admittedly the other eyelets were easy, so i used oil and a lot of time where two eyelets were so tight it would stretch and shred the tubing, I am thinking with such a cheap rod, the eyelets were manufactured poorly, this job was a major headache

 

 

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Sithpiper,

 

is that silicon tubing or surgical tubing? 

 

I've managed to get 6mm OD / 4mm ID silicone tubing through fairly easy. I did thread up from 3rd to 4th then up to the top eye. Then took the lower part of the tubing and added the wraps 3rd eye down to 2nd eye, then through 1st eye and out with no problem. Just cut point to the end of the tubing to assist the threading through - as illustrated by mr paul above. The silicone tubing has enough stretch in it to help pull through the small diam. top 3 eyes.

 

As mr paul indicates this is achievable with either silicone tubing or the surgical tubing.

 

The key is slow and even pulling whilst holding the eye very firmly between thumb and forefinger - i actually bruised inside of my thumb nail as I locked the eyes in tight under my thumb nail. But that technique meant that I reduced the risk of the eye snapping.

 

Have you managed to get the whole rod threaded with tubing now?

 

ireachy

Edited by ireachy

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Sithpiper,

 

is that silicon tubing or surgical tubing?

 

I've managed to get 6mm OD / 4mm ID silicone fairly easy. I did thread up from 3rd to 4th then top eye. Then added the wraps 3rd eye down to 2nd eye, then through 1st eye and out with no problem. Just cut point to the end of the tubing to assist the threading through. The silicone tubing has enough stretch in it to help pull through the small diam. top 3 eyes.

 

I think, from talking to mr paul that surgical tubing may be more problematic, and if that is what you are using then it is interesting that it keeps tearing apart on you.

 

Have you manage to get the whole rod threaded with tubing now?

 

ireachy

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The black version of this, from china as its not available to usa with the uk ebay links posted, I have it attached now, eyelet 3 or the middle one and the bottom one were both very difficult, i cut points etc etc, but breaks occurred often, the other eyelets were a breeze, so i put it down to bad luck with irregular eyelets

 

 

 

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48003641582032871c40bb6fc853279f.png

 

The black version of this, from china as its not available to usa with the uk ebay links posted, I have it attached now, eyelet 3 or the middle one and the bottom one were both very difficult, i cut points etc etc, but breaks occurred often, the other eyelets were a breeze, so i put it down to bad luck with irregular eyelets

 

 

 

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Got to this point, may restuff the roll, will be weathering/painting to better color

 

 

 

 

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Ammo Box Liner Installation

 

The lining seen inside the CE ammo box seems to be installed very untidily and messy. This could be intentional or it could be that it has got damaged through use. I will be installing my liner in a more organised fashion as I want it to hide the fixings that can be seen inside the box. Also I want it tidy for when I am trooping and under close inspection from the public.

 

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The fabric looks to be black and quite plain so I have chose to use a matt black cotton fabric taken from an inexpensive bed sheet from a local store. You get a lot of material for your money so if you make a mistake it is not a problem. Cut yourself a piece 35"x 23" and place evenly over the ammo box pushing the fabric into each of the 12 compartments.

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Fold under the edges and tack them to the dividers in the box being careful to glue them away from the edge. It looks better if fabric is not poking out from the box when finished.

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Tack all around the 4 sides. It does not have to be exact as we are still keeping it in the spirit of the CE pack so a little untidy is a good thing. Pinch a little of the fabric over each of the 6 holes in the centre and cut off with some scissors to make a small opening for the holes.

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It should look something like this.

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Line up the facade and push firmly onto the ammo box making sure the little cast marking is at the bottom as seen on the CE pack. You can see here how glueing it away from the edges results in a clean finish when assembled. DSC_0801_zps2fqxbvwm.jpg

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 There seems to be noticeable flat black markings painted onto the facade of the CE pack. It could be weathering, camo patterns or something else. Here is a rough outline of the more obvious black areas.

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Here I have recreated this paint scheme as best I can with the poor reference imagery available. It is interesting that the facade is painted black in this way yet the rest of the box remains its original green colour. More weathering will be applied over the top of this later after the pack is completed.

DSC_0828_zpsnpolwobv.jpg

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Pack complete, weathering started, need to slightly dirty the canvas roll and straps. Weathering carried out with Woodland Scenic pigments shown below, applied in order shown !
 
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For initial weathering of the cam buckles I just did an experiment with white vinegar to remove the protective coating on the metal. Left the buckle submerged in the vinegar for roughly 12 hours. this is without sanding any surface on the buckle. pretty decent results and eliminates the sanding process. Sorry cant post photos with my ipad, will try to upload later with another PC.<br><br>

<a data-ipb='nomediaparse' href='https://www.dropbox.com/s/sv855l86nymaf3b/Photo%20Dec%2011%2C%2010%2058%2059.jpg?dl=0'>https://www.dropbox.com/s/sv855l86nymaf3b/Photo%20Dec%2011%2C%2010%2058%2059.jpg?dl=0</a>

Edited by Bulldog44

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I used the same 'Super Blue' Gun bluing liquid I used for the tri-gate sliders. Soaked them for about 5 mins and it ate away the surface finish real well !

After reading your post on the super blue I found they sell it here in Japan but for $20 bucks or more. Going to get that stuff someday and the aluminum black too. Thanks for sharing that info. For now I have to go low tech and thrifty after spending ridiculous amounts on my pack parts.

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The "Bedroll"

 

This is a difficult part to identify. There are no distinguishable details to recognise what this is. Not only in regards to what was used for the prop but also what it could be used for in the film. In the real world we see these additions to soldiers back packs and they tend to be bed rolls. I personally would like this to be a poncho. Ireachy and myself have looked into possible ponchos/shelters however all of them have a lot of stitching detail on them and so we have not found one that matches. The CE bedroll seems to have no visible seams. It is heavily weathered and dirty and seems to be tucked under and folded each end and possibly stitched shut.

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The ends are folded in this fashion.

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The diameter of the bedroll is slightly wider than the ammo box.

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The texture of the fabric is rough.

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Each end of the roll is fatter than the rest of it. These straps need to be pulled tight to hold the antenna securely in place.

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Here again you can see how enlarged the ends of the bedroll are.

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This screen shot gives an idea of the colour

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Hot Toys show the roll to be brown.

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We have not seen anybody use anything yet that looks like it could be the found part. I have heard of pup tents, Chinese rifle cases, half shelters being used. Nothing matches. Either this is a found item or it could be that it is scratch built. i will go on to show how I opted to build my roll from scratch and to make it as close to the CE roll as possible even though once again the reference material is quite poor.

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Making and Weathering a Bedroll

 

 

My bedroll is made from medium weight natural unbleached calico/canvas. Using Dylon olive green the fabric is dyed in a washing machine. Once coloured I cut it to 4 meters in length and 53 inches wide. I roll it into a tube with a 14 inch circumference. Stuff it with bubble wrap to add volume but not weight. The ends need to be fatter than the centre so more bubble wrap is stuffed into these areas. Stitch it down its entire length. Each end is folded over in a semi circle reducing the the length to 43inches in total. 

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Sew the ends into place.

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I am using watered down acrylic paints to further darken the fabric. the olive dye makes a good base to start from. I will be using dark and light muddy browns, green greys, desert yellows, khaki, grey and black throughout this process. A large soft paint brush and an airbrush is used to apply the paints.

 

With the brush slap on the darker colours to knock back the olive.

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The airbrush is used to dust on layers of colour.

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Drip and splash the mud colours on to replicate muddy water hitting the roll. Let it soak in and make the fabric wet. This allows the colours to bleed into one another.

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Rough sand paper the fabric to damage the fibres and gain that textured surface. Do this while the fabric is wet or dry.

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Twist up the material and dry brush the folds with thicker paint. When the tension is released interesting random patterns are formed on the surface.

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Keep repeating the above techniques until the olive is completely gone and a darker, drab military green/ brown is produced. I have dusted with khaki and desert yellow too. 

 

This is my bedroll once painted. Further weathering will take place once it is attached to the pack. You can see the colour of the roll juxtaposed to the pack in daylight.

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My version 2 pack in the back ground. In the foreground is an incomplete pack I am in the process of building and colouring.  

DSC_2378_zpsmtnuuujp.jpg

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How do you keep the RAF metal quick release from sliding down to the snap on the shoulder strap? 

The CE hook could possibly be stitched in place. There are no clear images to confirm this however it does sit high up as you have correctly pointed out. I have just been  having a comparison with my hook and it is possible for the hook to get lodged in this position due to the buckles and wot not behind it and baring in mind the shoulder strap is tensioned with the weight of the pack pulling on it. It could be that this is how the guys who dressed the mannequins simply hung it. Either on purpose or it got wedged like that by itself. Might be advisable to not make any permanent changes until more ref becomes available. Unless you have some then please feel free to share it. Good observation ;)

 

This is the CE hook

14269316_1779850262299611_2044278320_n_z

Edited by mr paul

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How do you keep the RAF metal quick release from sliding down to the snap on the shoulder strap?

 

To hang your RAF Hook on the Shoulder Strap in the same fashion as the CE pack you must slide the male end of the quick release buckle through the base of the RAF Hook, this requires the nut & bolt and bushing to be removed temporarily. Use a socket and the proper screwdriver to avoid damaging the hardware on the hook.

 

Using the CE method to attach your RAF Hook also prevents the possibility of it falling off and getting damaged or getting lost during an outdoor troop, I wouldn't trust hanging my expensive hook from a small snap like that.

Edited by SlyFox740
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To hang your RAF Hook on the Shoulder Strap in the same fashion as the CE pack you must slide the male end of the quick release buckle through the base of the RAF Hook, this requires the nut & bolt and bushing to be removed temporarily. Use a socket and the proper screwdriver to avoid damaging the hardware on the hook.

 

Using the CE method to attach your RAF Hook also prevents the possibility of it falling off and getting damaged or getting lost during an outdoor troop, I wouldn't trust hanging my expensive hook from a small snap like that.

You do not need to remove the bolt to thread the metal popper through. A firm tug will do it and it goes straight through. It may not be advisable to remove the bolt on some of these hooks as they have not been undone in 50 years or more. If you do choose to remove it then a soak in WD40 or other oil may be a good idea. You may risk breaking the bolt otherwise. If the popper did come undone during a troop the hook would not slide off because the popper stops it from coming off the end of the strap. saying that I have trooped for hours wearing the hook and the popper is more than adequate to hold this heavy hook in place. It requires quite some force to undo the popper.

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As can be seen on this close up, the bushing appears to be behind 2 straps:-

Strap_zpsoocb23dm.jpg

 

The outer 'popper' strap and the inner 'pronged clip' strap:-

Strap%202_zpsedcxxihg.jpg

 

Putting the bushing behind the pronged clip strap (by removing the screw and bushing, threading it thru and refitting the nut etc) will make the clip protrude out from the strap as seen on the CE pack:-

Strap%203_zps2agd5nq9.jpg

 

Having said all that, I saw the movie tonight and, if you blink you'll miss the two scenes the pack is in !!!

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As can be seen on this close up, the bushing appears to be behind 2 straps:-

Strap_zpsoocb23dm.jpg

 

The outer 'popper' strap and the inner 'pronged clip' strap:-

Strap%202_zpsedcxxihg.jpg

 

Putting the bushing behind the pronged clip strap (by removing the screw and bushing, threading it thru and refitting the nut etc) will make the clip protrude out from the strap as seen on the CE pack:-

 

Having said all that, I saw the movie tonight and, if you blink you'll miss the two scenes the pack is in !!!

 

This is correct and exactly what I was referring to earlier. As I said before The Quick Release Buckle itself needs to be pulled through the base of the RAF hook, NOT just the Popper! This requires the nut and bolt and bushing to be temporarily removed. When done like this the hook hangs in the exact same way and protrudes outwards on the same angle, I'm 100% positive this is how the hook is attached to the shoulder strap, try it for yourself and see.

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This is correct and exactly what I was referring to earlier. As I said before The Quick Release Buckle itself needs to be pulled through the base of the RAF hook, NOT just the Popper! This requires the nut and bolt and bushing to be temporarily removed. When done like this the hook hangs in the exact same way and protrudes outwards on the same angle, I'm 100% positive this is how the hook is attached to the shoulder strap, try it for yourself and see.

Ok that makes sense. Can I see some pictures of your set up with the hook in this position. Maybe some comparison shots. If correct this is a great observation. I only have a few mm of strap before the stitching for the buckle occurs. The CE image appears to have a longer strap. Might just be angle and photography however I will look at this closer asap.

 

Strap_zpsr1k4mmxm.png

Edited by mr paul

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Ok that makes sense. Can I see some pictures of your set up with the hook in this position. Maybe some comparison shots. If correct this is a great observation. I only have a few mm of strap before the stitching for the buckle occurs. The CE image appears to have a longer strap. Might just be angle and photography however I will look at this closer asap.

 

Strap_zpsr1k4mmxm.png

 

Nope, no longer strap, no modifications or anything crazy, just pull the hook up as high as possible under all the quick release strapping. That's all.

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Here's a comparison shot I threw together with the images I had available, my pack is on the left, CE pack on the right.

image_zps6dwixqoy.jpeg

Edited by SlyFox740

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