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bishopdonmiguel

Bishop's Doopydoo's E-11 Build

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There are great Doopy E-11 build threads here and I'm not going to rehash all the steps of my build. It would be redundant to do so. I did want to contribute some of the techniques I used for my E-11.

 

Full disclosure, while I do strive to be accurate, I also like to insert some of myself into every prop I build or create. When these things clash, I tend to favor my preference. So veterans, please point out anything I might do here that violates accuracy. I'm not offended by such things and it would be good for anyone reading through this to have those facts.

 

Here we go.

 

As many have previously encouraged, replace the resin fasteners with the real hardware. For the grip lock, I used a tapered brass screw and cap nut. Sanding off the edges of the nut provides a nice rounded dome after hollowing out the resin bit on the grip. Although somewhat larger than the real thing, I think the nut here is easier than molding epoxy replacements.

 

The fire selector knob uses a pin like many other builders have done before. This is not yet epoxied in and will be painted separately.

 

E11-01.jpg

 

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Attaching the grip, I see pins being used a lot. I do think pins are great for small parts but for me, using screws with epoxy is easier and provides a better bond IMO. Just be sure they aren't so long that they interfere with bolt installation later. Cut to length with a Dremel as necessary. Fill and sand the grip hole with Milliput or other filler. I left the front screw open for installing the trigger guard later.

 

E11-02.jpg

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As others have noted, metal fasteners add visual interest to the finished prop. Rivet heads are an easy way to make the stock and rear sight look more realistic.

 

E11-03.jpg

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As with the grip, using screws and epoxy to mount the magazine receiver creates a strong bond. I partially filled the cavity to provide a little extra surface area for epoxy to grab when mounting the magazine later.

 

E11-04.jpg

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Despite the quality of the Hengstler Counter cast, the window bump is disappointing. I understand my solution isn't an accurate rebuild of this piece but it is easy and will improve the look substantially I hope.

 

Carve out window using a Dremel. Add a straight border using styrene strips. Partially fill the void with resin to create a smooth bottom. Numbers and clear resin will be added later to finish the look.

 

E11-05.jpg

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I'm adding a subtle texture to the gun body using a spray paint. The original Sterling has a rough texture and this will not replicate that, but it will add some visual interest and make the gun body different from the other parts. Not too much as I don't want to wash out the details of the cast. After this cures, a thin coat or two of high quality flat black enamel will be applied.

 

E11-06.jpg

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While the gun body dries, it's a good time to paint the detail parts. As I understand it, the Hengstler Counter is part painted metal, part black plastic. For the lower metal part, I use a base of metallic copper. This will show through somewhat after a thin layer of gunmetal lacquer. The top portion is painted black and a semi-gloss topcoat sets it apart from the lower piece and helps sell the plastic look I'm going for.

 

E11-07.jpg

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Scope base is brass with an overcoat of flat black enamel. After fully curing and given a light buffing, some detail touch up with brass helps with a "used" look. As another builder here pointed out, white crayon is an excellent method to fill the lettering.

 

E11-09.jpg

Edited by bishopdonmiguel
Spelling

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As with the stock and other parts, using metal fasteners adds realism. Some builders have replaced the front and back with real lenses but pouring clear resin into these voids is a method to add a similar look without all the work (rear filled, front will be filled later).

 

E11-10.jpg

Edited by bishopdonmiguel
Correct reference to scope parts.

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An effective way to make something look more realistic is to use different colors. As this prop is essentially all black, using different shades of black works well. Adding different sheens with clear topcoats is another useful method to help draw the eye to different pieces and details.

 

For the magazine and release button, using the same base of flat black would result in these parts simply becoming an extension of the gun body. A rub of graphite powder over these parts and then a thin topcoat of clear semi-gloss lacquer to "lock in" the graphite gives these some extra sheen and a metallic flair. This is a great subtle contrast to the gun body and these parts look like they are made of a different material.

 

E11-08.jpg

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I don't know what this part is called but I know there has been extensive research on their origin. While I have no plans to make this more accurate, it is a cool looking part and I think it deserves an interesting paint job. I think the originals were partially constructed from aluminum but I wanted to add some copper accents. I painted the little thingys in the center silver to help them stand out a bit.

 

I'll be modifying these a bit during final assembly.

 

E11-11.jpg

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I found a suitably sized spring at Ace Hardware. A piece of PVC pipe and small wood stub to hold the spring serve as the bolt. A bit of painting here to match the detail on the body helps communicate the function of this piece.

 

E11-12.jpg

E11-13.jpg

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Hengstler Counter with fasteners and painted details.

 

To finish the window detail, I cut a piece of black styrene and applied vinyl dividers and numbers (my TK number). This plaque is affixed to the bottom of the window void with epoxy and then filled with clear resin to approximate a piece of glass or plastic.

 

E11-15.jpg

E11-14.jpg

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I decided the resin trigger and guard would be prone to breaking so I created aluminum replacements. I didn't have thick aluminum on hand for the trigger so I epoxied two halves together to achieve the proper thickness.

 

E11-16.jpg

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Shape the trigger guard in a vice and compare to resin. Apply a line in black Sharpie to use as an alignment point. Rinse-and-repeat until they match. Carve out ends with a Dremel to fit into gun body recesses. Sand with increasingly higher grit paper gives a smooth finish. Buff with steel wool before priming and painting.

 

E11-17.jpg

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Carve out gun body as necessary to accept the aluminum guard and trigger. Test fit. Prime and paint parts (mask of small areas for epoxy to adhere to).

 

I tinted the epoxy black to help hide the unpainted metal and fill in the void. I'll probably cover this with a brush on of the body paint to complete the look.

 

E11-18.jpg

E11-19.jpg

 

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11 hours ago, Lestat616 said:

Just arrived a week or so ago,  and am lurking through threads. This looks simply amazing. 

Thanks for taking a look and your nice comment. Lots of inspiring builds here. Be sure to check those out.

 

 

 

 

 

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One last detail I want to add is bare wires from the Hengstler to the part on the magazine receiver. I'd seen a few pics with wires and thought they looked cool and add a sense of purpose to that part.

 

I applied a bit of solder to a short piece of wire split into a "Y." This holds it together and keeps the wire from fraying. Too much and the wire would not be bendable. A smearing of black paint completes the look.

 

After drilling shallow 1/8" holes in the magazine part, I used a small section from rivet heads to create a place for the wire to epoxy in. This also serves as a "pressure fit" component to allow the wires to be removed from the part should the scope rail need to be disassembled later.

 

A 1/8" hole in the Hengstler provides a permanent connection for the wire. As with the trigger assembly, I used tinted epoxy.

 

E11-20.jpg

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10 hours ago, boyorastroboy said:

Beautiful work! Love the varying shades under the black.

Thank you. It's a labor of love, especially since this will be my troop blaster and I know it will get beat up. I wish Doopy would use tinted black resin but any scuffs and dings will just add to the character of this.

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Build is complete. Many steps were skipped in the making of this thread but you get the idea. Coming up are some shots taken outside so hopefully the subtlety of the various blacks, undercoats and sheens show.

 

E11-21.jpg

E11-22.jpg

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