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Tim’s first time build (RS Prop Masters ESB TK)


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It's really a personal choice, first time helmet builds are always a little tricky, I've built quite a few different helmets and the basics are pretty much the same, although some have particular quirks not seen on other helmets.

 

But as it's an RS helmet I would say follow their builds, after all they should know what they are doing :duim:

 

One other detail the DO's bring up from time to time is the position of the ears which RS may not see as that important, here is the ideal look

 

Screenshot_20210919-183113_Google.thumb.jpg.0144767d6dbd67bb07ff49af4eab8810.jpgScreenshot_20210919-183130_Google.thumb.jpg.bd6aea17d17528f84feccbdeb1156c6f.jpg

 

And if you need some reference material you can't go past "Star Wars Helmets" http://www.starwarshelmets.com

 

Good luck with the build

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As Glen mentioned, the "ideal" ear position has the top (round) part centered right below the rear of the trap, and in a perfect world it should cover the faceplate/cap seam completely.  Note in the references how the bottom screw lines up with the rear angle of the trap.  Sometimes the top 2 line up with that line, sometimes they are just close, which is fine and dandy.

 

We aren't looking for perfection by any means, but it's important that the bottom should be angled back.

 

    GNIkY45.jpg  HrpLxy2.jpg  FizNuRc.jpg?2  ZARkpml.jpg          QxflLs0.jpg

 

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My helmet is an RS helmet as well and I mainly followed their tutorial, with some additional help from the people on here and some small variations that I found improved the overall appearance. Maybe go one video at a time and whenever you're done with a video or have any questions about a certain step or procedure you can come back here and ask for help. As long as you post pictures after every step, so that the people on here can catch any potential mistakes, those tutorials will be very helpful -- even if you decide to not always follow them to the letter and instead go with some other techniques ;)

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Thanks guys. As I thought, makes sense to follow the video for the particular helmet.

Already noted the position of the ears but thanks for reaffirming all the same.

Here is a progress picture. Just it the process of filing out the teeth. 3441c5e6a31a3197635f35113d461ba8.jpg

I’d like to draw your attention to the second tooth from the left. It looks a little wider than the others after sanding down the recess area. Is this likely to be the helmet itself or have I made a mistake?


Sent from The Empire

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Some screen references for comparison, notice in the first picture the second tooth is a little larger in the bottom corner than other teeth

 

 

Normally when opening up the teeth I follow the look from side to side not the actual particular tooth opening.

 

If it really bothers you there is the option of adding a small amount of ABS paste to fill any extra gap, normally just add some tape behind for support.

 

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Moving onto trimming down the eyes. From reference photos I’ve indicated where I think the trim line should be on each eye.

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What doesn’t come across is the ‘bump’ on the lower right eye, which I will ensure is there for accuracy.

Please could you let me know if I have my trim lines in the right place.

Thanks all.


Sent from The Empire

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Looking good, if you check the reference there is a small lip left on the screen helmets BUT many of remove all the excess material as you have drawn, it can give you a little extra viewing area, especially in the inside corners of the eyes.

 

Once you are happy with the trimming you can use some sandpaper on a small block of wood or even just rolled up to sand across the lens area to match the top and bottoms, just helps the lenses sit a little flatter. On lenses some use a full sheet and anchor on either sides, I like to cut the lenses just a little larger than the openings and silicon in place, these can be swapped out later if they get scratched or damaged.

 

Looking good, move along :duim:

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  • 2 weeks later...

It was going so well…and then I had to remove a rivet.

Basically as I started to drill out the rivet (I just needed to reposition the right side) and as I did this I didn’t notice the actual rivet was turning and making an even larger hole *sigh*.

No panic though, at least it’s an area that will eventually be covered by the ear pieces. My initial thought was ABS paste but wanted to check if there were any other suggestions.


7d27ae60091d2555b843a47ab7c981cb.jpg


Sent from The Empire

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As the ear will cover it you wouldn't even need to fill that hole. If you really want to tape behind before applying ABS paste.

 

I always advise to use self tapper screws for test assemble before using rivets.

 

For drilling rivets out use a sharp bit with a slow speed and make sure you grip behind with a pair of pliers 

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Yeah, I wouldn't worry about making ABS paste, but if the new hole is in close proximity to the old one I would suggest patching it with a scrap piece of ABS.  The reason being is that the area between them (red arrow) will be weaker and may split depending on how much pressure there is pushing out.  You should be fine, but better safe than sorry.

 

8wrXQ3E.jpg

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Thanks chaps. A bit of a daft mistake but all part of the process. At least it will be an area that will be covered.
@joseph, will e6000 be fine for glueing down the scrap ABS? Also, I’m assuming I’ll glue this on top of the hole?


Sent from The Empire

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E-6000 should be fine, Tim.  Just use it sparingly, and it may be a good idea to put a piece of tape over the other side to keep it from seeping out of the hole when you clamp it.

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