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Why are the RO TKS different?

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Well, first off cameras nowadays are a lot better, thus picking up more detail. The new TKs are built to be seen up close.

 

Being able to move is also another reason. In all the OT films we just see the TKs shuffling along, but for new movies, like RO, they need to be able to run and whatnot.

 

https://youtu.be/JUafi3EWBY8?t=10m52s

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Quoting a fellow trooper and garrison member:

 

"It's a classic tk in high def. It's like we've been looking through a smudged glass all these years that was finally wiped clean. I love my classic tks but this is a believably functional suit of space armor."

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I did hear a theory, as the Empire only just converted from clone to stormtrooper the armor was very crisp and define, by time ANH came around the Empire was pumping out so much armor that it started loosing some of the crisp defined lines.

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I just say that armour was built at factories throughout the expanse of the galaxy and your look depended to some degree on the locale of where it was made. You can justify inconsistencies that way.

 

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I did hear a theory, as the Empire only just converted from clone to stormtrooper the armor was very crisp and define, by time ANH came around the Empire was pumping out so much armor that it started loosing some of the crisp defined lines.

 

Which would be fine except that this movie and ANH are supposed to take place at the "same time", not separated by any amount of years or months.

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Pretty much everything is different on the RO TK.

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The word for me is that the original stormtrooper armor was sculted by true artists, when every iteration of this armor that came after was made by people without any aesthetic talent, and thus looking worse than the cheap vac formed armors made in 1977. No matter the amount of extra details or the crispness of those details, if the overall look of the armor is bad, the result will be too. And that R1 armor is totally missing the spot...

Well at least Brian Muir saved the Vader costume from the garbage they pulled for ROTS. Too bad they didn't ask him to also take care of the stormtrooper...

Edited by The5thHorseman
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I did hear a theory, as the Empire only just converted from clone to stormtrooper the armor was very crisp and define, by time ANH came around the Empire was pumping out so much armor that it started loosing some of the crisp defined lines.

"Just converted" might be  a stretch, since there is a 19 year gap between ROTS and ANH.

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I just say that armour was built at factories throughout the expanse of the galaxy and your look depended to some degree on the locale of where it was made. You can justify inconsistencies that way.

 

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Personally I think this is most reasonable story-wise, but from a movie making perspective I'm guessing they did because they could, or it was cheaper to make, or because it offered more mobility. Certainly they are not as aesthetically beautiful as the ANH/ESB TK. Then again, the actors in ANH hacked at the legs so they could move around on stunts...

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Don't forget that 99% of the people don't notice the difference between a Rubies, FX or RS. So imagine telling them there is a difference in the Stormtroopers in the movies.

 

 

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 that the original stormtrooper armor was sculted by true artists

 

Sorry, but each time i hear/read such, i can only disagree.

 

The design was art, but the sculpting was more like "kids with play-doh".

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I just say that armour was built at factories throughout the expanse of the galaxy and your look depended to some degree on the locale of where it was made. You can justify inconsistencies that way.

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Lots of factories for a huge army. This seems to make the most sense. During most of our wars (on earth) this has been the case for clothing and kitting our soldiers.

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They are no longer vac-forming props. Now they 3D print. That's why they look different.

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They are no longer vac-forming props. Now they 3D print. That's why they look different.

My guess would have been injection molded.

 

But 3D makes sense. So easy and cheap right now.

 

 

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It depends on the size of the run. 3D is still slow, lower res, and on large runs can be more expensive then injection molding. I'm sure they calculated out the cost somewhere and made the decision whether or not to have 3D be the master to make molds from vs. just printing them all. Honestly, I'm not sure what current pricing is, but I bet someone in the industry could let us know the inflection point on run size.

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Don't forget that 99% of the people don't notice the difference between a Rubies, FX or RS. So imagine telling them there is a difference in the Stormtroopers in the movies.

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True, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't or can't talk/complain about this thing that we love so dearly.

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Don't forget that 99% of the people don't notice the difference between a Rubies, FX or RS. So imagine telling them there is a difference in the Stormtroopers in the movies.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

I don't believe that is fully accurate. When you have four FX troopers together, they just see stormtroopers. But I can assure you that if you have 2 ATA (or AP, etc.) and an FX, everyone asks why the FX is so wrong.

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Injection molds aren't cheap either. Especially when prototyping. You don't go injection until the prototype is sound. The only reason that they would go injection is to mass produce armor. Standards can't be maintained with vac-forming.

 

I would have to see a RO in person to tell how i was built, but I assume they made them the same way as the FOTK, from the detail that I've seen in the screenshots.

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The simple answer is 40 years of technology advancement in film, prop and costume technology. Not to mention the inflation adjusted budgets are probably wildly different. If they could have had these, or similar, in 76 they would have. To think otherwise is probably foolish.

Personally I really like the RO TK. I'd love one to troop in I like the detail and I like the clean lines. I just don't want to spend the non trivial number of cars to get close on one.

This isn't to say I don't like the older TK, I love my ANH and would like at least an ESB Mk2 and a ROTJ bucket also.

 

The exact construction is tricky, but the main armour pieces are cast separately from some of the detail parts which are then added after.  I'd assume this is just to make the casting process easier.  It doesn't look sprayed, but it could be.  Theres a few areas of wear that have stayed the white, others have darkened but that could be dirt.

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They are no longer vac-forming props. Now they 3D print. That's why they look different.

Speed and cost are always prime considerations in the industry. The form they used was probably designed in 3dsMax or AutoCAD and then cut on a three-axis router. 3D printing is great for one-offs, detail pieces and prototypes but when it comes to a production run, it's way too slow. I used to build scenery and props professionally and I'd bet that a lot of the kit is still vacuum formed. It's fast and cheap especially using bucks made by CNCs.

Edited by Addertime

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I really hate the fact they have used EPVII costume pieces for a movie supposed to be pre ANH, much like the other costumes, how about some continuity Disney

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The simple answer is 40 years of technology advancement in film, prop and costume technology. Not to mention the inflation adjusted budgets are probably wildly different. If they could have had these, or similar, in 76 they would have. To think otherwise is probably foolish.

 

Personally I really like the RO TK. I'd love one to troop in I like the detail and I like the clean lines. I just don't want to spend the non trivial number of cars to get close on one.

 

This isn't to say I don't like the older TK, I love my ANH and would like at least an ESB Mk2 and a ROTJ bucket also.

 

The exact construction is tricky, but the main armour pieces are cast separately from some of the detail parts which are then added after.  I'd assume this is just to make the casting process easier.  It doesn't look sprayed, but it could be.  Theres a few areas of wear that have stayed the white, others have darkened but that could be dirt.

 

I agree with Chris. Let's face it, If we would have seen OT TKs in Rogue One it just would not have held up to current standards in terms of High-Definition Detail or Action Sequences. Believe it or not Disney actually wants to get a new generation of kids into Star Wars, not that they don't care about the original fans but it's important to keep the fan base growing, and to keep future generations interested. I welcome the new design and i feel it's an awesome take on a classic design. Like the tube stripes are now actual vent slits cut through the surface; BRILLIANT! I'm fairly certain the costume designer originally intended the tube stripes to look like vents of some kind in the first place. In fact they're listed as such in many official Lucasfilm licensed books. Like Chris said, if they could of had these back in '76 they would have. I realize purists are thinking "but that's not what ended up on screen back in 1977" and I understand that, but this is science fiction after all. It's Star Wars-lore and it's now part of the galaxy, I like idealized troopers because that's how I remember seeing them as a kid. It wasn't until I was older and wiser and with the advent of the internet and Hi-Def and all that we started learning just how imperfect our favorite plastic space men really were. But even most troopers in the 501st are more idealists than purists and prefer to present their TK's as most people would imagine what a stormtrooper would look like in person; shiny, smooth, clean, white armor. Not bumpy textured, cracked, off-white armor with paint chipping off the hands and feet... and armor Lol

Edited by SlyFox740
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