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gazmosis

HOWTO: ATA Helmet Build hand painted details PIC HEAVY!

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I was commissioned to build a TK helmet as part of a cancer fundraising event this upcoming October. I figured I would use this chance to share the helmet building tips I have learned. I would also like to give Terrell at ATA a big kudos for his help in obtaining this helmet for such a great cause.

Since I have built so many helmets, I have a supply of accessories so I just ordered the plastic parts from ATA; helmet face, cap-n-back, and ears. DSCN1511_zps8d677471.jpgI have a supply of UK accurate brow trim, Weber's pump "S" trimDSCN1512_zps9727d4ef.jpgand even a supply of Hovi tips. DSCN1513_zps520ebc47.jpgDSCN1514_zpsff6a37d8.jpgONTO THE BUILD!!!!!   I will start with the face first. The eyes are always a good place to start. ATA faceplates have a pretty distinct mold line already in place to follow. DSCN1515_zps901d10b7.jpgI marked along these lines and using the mini saw blade on my dremmel, proceeded to rough trim most of the eye out.DSCN1516_zpsc5787c68.jpgI then go to the sanding drum for precision sanding down to the cut line. DSCN1518_zps28768b8f.jpgEverything gets a once over with some sandpaper to smooth the edges down nice.DSCN1517_zpsd265cbb3.jpgIT starts to look more "Stormtroopery" at this point!DSCN1519_zpsfeee2062.jpgI then mark my tooth openings and pilot a couple holes in each as well as hit the back with the sanding drum to make trimming easier. A fresh exacto blade makes getting into the small corners an easier task.DSCN1520_zps8e0ad865.jpgWhen I plan out my tooth openings, I try to consider the slope of the frown and how that will look when painted. I try to follow that slope when trimming. If planned well, the results should be the same. I am happy with how they came out.DSCN1521_zpsadce5b4d.jpgDSCN1522_zps79c1e147.jpgI have nothing against using mini files, but I never have. If you are careful and patient with the exacto, the end result can be nice. I can now move onto mating the cap with the face. I wanted to start marking different things. I marked the underside of the neck opening. DSCN1523_zps1e448923.jpgTHIS IS VERY IMPORTANT!!! I WILL MARK IT BUT NOT TRIM IT YET. ALWAYS WAIT UNTIL THE EARS ARE INSTALLED TO TRIM THE NECK OPENING. THIS WILL ALLOW THE NECK OPENING TO BE TRIMMED TO MEET THE BOTTOM OF THE EARS. IF YOU TRIM THIS AHEAD OF TIME, IT'S A CRAPSHOOT IF IT WILL ALIGN CORRECTLY!!!!!

Anyway, I move onto the sides of the face.DSCN1524_zps8075a117.jpgDSCN1525_zps0c617b04.jpgNext is the brow line. It is kind of important to make sure this is level across or pretty close to it. You don't want too much of a "move along" bend nor do you want the brow line to curve upward at the ends. It is also important to remember not to trim too much off the brow. Make your cut line just below the bumpy part just about as wide as the brow trim. You can see my cut line marked here.DSCN1526_zps669e8578.jpgAlthough it is not necessary, I make my brow line extend to the rear of the trapezoid. I make sure this corner between the brow line and the ear has a flat area. This will accommodate the flat bottom of the brow trim better and prevent eventual splitting of the brow trim.DSCN1527_zps140c23d4.jpgI also don't know why, but I like the look of the helmet when the brow trim edge follows the angled slope of the trap.DSCN1528_zps45a526dd.jpgWhen fitting your brow trim, REALLY take your time here!! You kind of want this to be perfect. Trim little bits at a time until it fits right where you want it to. You can see how many time I micro-trimmed.DSCN1532_zps6b91987c.jpgThis detail assures that the trim fits tight and buckle free across the brow.DSCN1530_zps55592986.jpgDSCN1531_zpsdc1e85c7.jpgDSCN1529_zpsb10c49c6.jpg

Now is when stuff gets serious. The side seams are one of the most important steps.  These need to to be trimmed out carefully. The right side(AS YOU ARE LOOKING AT THE HELMET) is pretty much OK to trim along the raised mold line you can faintly see where I marked this next to my thumb in the above pic. The goal is to have a bit of overlap of the cap on the cheek. The right side has plenty although I still trim slightly in front of the high point. The left side (AS YOU ARE LOOKING AT THE HELMET) is another story. If you follow and trim the raised area, you will end up with close to no overlap near the bottom. You can see in the following picture the straight line which represents where the faceplate lines up under the cap. You see there ls no overlap compared to the curved pencil line which marks the mold ridge where most people cut it. DSCN1535_zps7b98ade4.jpgThe blue line is my new cut line. The problem, however, is that this new area sits below the ridge. I need it to be even so it sits on the face properly. Bust out the iron.DSCN1536_zps1b3adfd3.jpgI am very reluctant to use a propane torch on anything regarding this or ANY OTHER helmet. The thinned plastic will warp out of control and instantly if not heated precisely. The iron lets you heat a single area and ONLY that area. DSCN1537_zps598fdb90.jpgWith a little patience, you can see the nice fit I got.DSCN1538_zps8edf928b.jpgI can't believe I didn;t take a pic of the left side for this section, but it will be seen later. OK.....now that the sides are trimmed, it is now time to mate the cap with the face. This is the time to decide how high/low you want your brow to sit above the eyes. Whatever height you choose, it should sit even on both sides. It doesn;t necessarily have to be level----it can be a little higher in the middle for example, but it should sit the same on both sides to NOT give a lop sided appearance to your helmet. Once you have determined your brow height, it is time to center the cap on the face. The alignment points I have ALWAYS used are the front of the trapezoids and the upward slope of the rear of each eye. I need to be ready to mark the drill locations so I will first drill out the ear centers on each side of the cap.DSCN1540_zpse3f2de4d.jpgYes I stopped before plunging the bit into my finger....though I have done that before. LIVE AND LEARN!!!!! ouch.............    ANYHOO!!!!!   You can see here what I use as alignment pointsDSCN1542_zpscb97e6b8.jpg

 

DSCN1541_zpsa516ab41.jpgOnce I double and triple check, I mark my center.

DSCN1543_zpsec5d62b7.jpgI double check again and mark the drill point on the face through the pre-drilled hole in the cap's ear.DSCN1545_zpsd16696a1.jpgAlthough rivets will be what I will use to secure the two halves together, there are things I need to do before that can happen. I will temporarily fasten them with a nut and screw.DSCN1539_zpse03592b1.jpgI secure the right side.DSCN1547_zps9eb1c5c7.jpgThe other reason I use screws initially is if things are slightly off. If they are, the screw can be removed and the hole in the face moved slightly until it's right. That can't be done if you rivet it straight off. 

The next step is critical. With the right side secured, I force the brow against face by "pulling" the cap across the face with the palm of my hand. You want no gaps between the brow trim and face.DSCN1546_zps87e1bc94.jpgOnce I am happy,  I mark it, drill it and fasten it. DSCN1548_zps6f990f16.jpgI was very happy with the placement and as you can see, no gap across the brow. The small gap on the left at the bottom of the trap is because of the mold in that section. I may try to heat that out later.  Noe I need to take this apart and do the things necessary before permanently attaching the halves. I will give a mirror polish to the whole helmet at the end, but there are areas that cannot be easily reached when together. You should not get any compound on the rubber...it won;t come clean. DSCN1549_zpsf53fcb1b.jpgI will polish the ear areas on the face as well as the brow line. I hope you can see the before and after effects of the compound and elbow grease combo....beforeDSCN1550_zps03a975eb.jpgafterDSCN1551_zps47eab987.jpg Next I will move onto installing lenses. This is always easier to do before marrying the cap and face. In stead of gluing them, I make a screw stage for the lenses to be secured by and to sit on. This makes replacement easy while allowing ventilation. And it kind of looks cool. One of my Garrison mates works for a hockey equipment store and got me these screw posts that have a raised section on the female thread post with flat sides. I will embed these into a stack of scrap ABS similar to a really thick snap plate. The first hole  needs to have flat sides so the post will sit in it flush and not rotate when the screw is tightened.DSCN1553_zpsf0616b01.jpgThe rough stack...DSCN1554_zps6ca2323e.jpgThen cleaned up.DSCN1555_zpsd0ac9f24.jpgI will make 4 total. You can see how they sit next to the eye opening.DSCN1556_zpsbf2bc010.jpgOnce made, I will glue them in with Plasti-weld. E6000 would also work here. First I give a wipe down to the face with mineral spirits to get rid of the greasy release agent.DSCN1552_zps72ffea24.jpg Once they were installed, I used a piece of ATA lens material I had from a TX build and cut out each lens so that the screw can be incorporated.DSCN1557_zps82945e9f.jpgAfter they were cut to size, I brought them upstairs for a hot water bath. I dropped them one at a time into the boiling water until they became floppy then laid them into position. until they cooled. I returned to the dungeon where I drilled them out. Before installing, I noticed a bad haze on the lenses which I needed to polish out with the rubbing compound. After the "cleaning", they were installed.DSCN1559_zpsca10f837.jpgDSCN1558_zps9bf8961f.jpgI removed them and set them aside to be installed last to prvent scratches. I then cit the screen for the mouth.DSCN1560_zps33b114d6.jpgI will install this at the end as well. It's hard to paint the teeth with the screen installed.  With the interior work I needed to do complete, I can now permanently join the cap and face. DSCN1562_zpsd476947a.jpgWith the halves riveted together, you can see in the above picture what happens........the halves hinge and screws up your brow line. There needs to be an additional fastener installed somewhere down the seam line to prevent this hinging. You can see I did mine on the cheek. THIS IS WHY I NEEDED THAT OVERLAP ON THE LEFT SIDE!!!!!!!DSCN1564_zps08166e6f.jpgDSCN1563_zps55d3155f.jpgGuess what's next? Ears. A separate tutorial could be done on ears alone.  First I drill out the attachment holes on both sides of the rank bar. I will wait to do the lower one until later.DSCN1565_zps73c4fbf2.jpgnext I will use a larger bit to make a recess for the tapered screw. DO NOT UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCE DO THIS WITH A DRILL!!!! THE BIT WILL GRAB THE HOLE AND GO THROUGH RUINING THE EAR!!! I'VE DONE IT BEFORE!!! Twist it by hand!!!!DSCN1568_zps3843cd90.jpgOk...One thing to remember with TE or TE2 based helmets Like ATA, CAP, MTK, is that the mold lines on the ears are suggestions not law. Those lines are there from the helmet they were molded from....NOT YOURS!!! Every helmet goes together slightly different. The ears need to be trimmed to YOUR helmet. You can ALWAYS trim more off. You can't replace what you have trimmed too much off of so go slow! 

I do a general trim to get rid of flashing and get the base shape of the ear.DSCN1570_zps88dcbf82.jpgI was blessed when I bought this sanding table.....really comes in handy....ears....waist belts.....thigh packs........belt rivet covers.........belt corners...OK STOP!!! FOCUS!!!!

DSCN1569_zps9dd44add.jpgAn ear guide can be very lengthy....but in words what I can give as advice is to #1. go slow, #2. remember that what you do on one side(front or back) can/will affect how the other side sits. DSCN1571_zpseb5081c0.jpg#3. if you want the ear to sit flush, note where the gaps are and where the ear is touching. Sand away what is touching.You can see where I marked here. I will sand that.DSCN1572_zps086bda39.jpgI use the sanding drum on my dremmel. That's it!!! You can take off a millimeter at a time or less if you want with control. This process still can take me upwards of an hour to do one ear the way I like it. So go slow until you get the fit you want.DSCN1573_zps12f87606.jpgI added a little notch at the top to make up for the difference level of the two halves.027.jpgNow is the time I install the bottom screw. I make sure to drill down towards the neck opening not up towards the eyes. You want the ear to be pulled downward and tight against the cheek tube.DSCN1574_zps034dc0e3.jpgThe left ear.....DSCN1576_zps265a9500.jpgDSCN1577_zps5356a0d0.jpgNow is a good time to mark, remove and cut your ear attachment screws down. DO NOT CUT THEM IN THE HELMET!!! THE HEAT WILL MELT THE PLASTIC!!!!! DSCN1575_zps02bc1c16.jpgWith the ears on, you can see now why I wait to trim the neck opening out. You can see where I have it marked.DSCN1578_zps36becbb3.jpgNeck openeing finished.DSCN1579_zps46cde00f.jpgOnce I make progress on the painting I will post updates.

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I can move onto the painting. I will use a mixture of Airbrush and regular brush. I will airbrush all the large, flat amounts of gray for a smooth finish with no brush marks. The only place I cannot mask off is within the tears below the eyes. Anyway, these are my starting points.DSCN1580_zps38142c68.jpgIn here are all my templates I will use as guides. Since I handpaint everything I do, these have lasted me a long time. 

I will begin by penciling in the outlines of everything I want to paint.DSCN1582_zps5e1964cf.jpgIn some cases, I will use the actual stencil for the outline.DSCN1583_zps2970b770.jpgNext I begin the masking process.DSCN1584_zps49ee9a24.jpgEven when airbrushing, good, thorough masking is essential. You really want to make sure to seal the painted edges well with your fingernail to ensure a leakproof seal along the edge.DSCN1585_zpsc3a44aa3.jpgDSCN1586_zps90c6c97f.jpgAll the top corners of the traps have rounded corners. I need to cot this out carefully with the exacto knife.DSCN1587_zps3e464347.jpgYou can see the pieces of tape I used to go across the corner at an angle.These are just to show the outlines of the tears and frown which I will be brush painting.DSCN1588_zpsa4e6cac0.jpgDSCN1589_zps9410ce1e.jpgI cover the remaining areas with newspaper and I am ready to paint. DSCN1590_zps308774a7.jpgThis is my weapon.DSCN1591_zps8025c49d.jpgEverything gets a wipedown with alcohol to remove hand grease and anything else that might affect paint adhesion. Some of you may ask about primer. I have never primed these areas due to the small surface area painted. If I was painting the entire helmet or some larger area, it would get primed but here it's just a wasted step in my opinion. All went well and the masking tape was removed. I did this while the paint was still tacky so not to get any paint lift. This dries fairly rapidly so I moved onto my paint chair.

Here are my brushes. DSCN1593_zps622a26cb.jpgI have a flat brush for larger areas(vocoder and frown) and two different sizes of detail brushes. One for outlining and one for the trap and tear lines. They also come in handy for the ends of the frown. 

First I tackled the outline of the ears. You can see that the bristles on the brushes are long. This is by design. Yes there are smaller brushes, but with these smaller ones, if you press down on the brush, the bristles fan out and so will your paint line. With a long bristled brush, the bristles just bend but your line will stay the same width. You do need to make sure that there is not too much paint on the brush. Less is more here. Once you find that balance and with a little practice, you will be able to get the results you need. 

 

The outlines of the tears and traps and ears should be a pinstripe and not a thick line. DSCN1595_zps750af0c2.jpgDSCN1596_zps4a89a7d5.jpgI then painted in the frown and the tears. I needed to wait for those to dry, so I went ahead and outlined the traps.DSCN1597_zpsacd7989d.jpgOnce those were dry, I could move onto the details. I outlined within the trap first.DSCN1598_zpsf6c7becd.jpgThen I use the template and a sharpie to mark the position of the vent lines within it.DSCN1599_zpsd243e6dc.jpgDSCN1600_zpsc99d6d2e.jpgI grab the brush with the slightly larger bristles to do the lines.DSCN1601_zps425d1495.jpgAfter a few minutes of breath holding, I am happy with the outcome.DSCN1602_zps3b9c2694.jpg

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Anyone building a helmet should bookmark this thread. 

 

How can we get Gaz to write an ear specific howto? Let the peer pressuring begin. 

 

This topic has been moved to the HOWTO forum and pinned. 

 

-Eric

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We are all here to help one another. It is an honor to be pinned. Thank you, sir!

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You are a true master of this craft Steve, very cool.

 

 

Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

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Thank you guys!!

 

I made a bit more progress over the weekend that I wanted to share.

After finishing the tears, I moved to the back of the helmet. Using templates with the vent lines cut out,DSCN1621_zps637e230e.jpg

I did the same sharpie guidelines as I used on the tears. I wanted the tops and bottoms of the vent lines to look a bit straighter so I masked off ending points and just painted up to that.DSCN1614_zps9f748a05.jpgThe result was still the hand painted look with a slight bit of definition.DSCN1615_zpsbba9235f.jpgDSCN1616_zpsf8ae9858.jpgWith that dry, I can now move onto the tube stripes. I try to mimic the Dave M decals available from Trooperbay. The tube stripes are no exception. A while back, a BRILLIANT thread was posted by a trooper who used templates and he painted white in them first sealing the edges and then painted the blue on top. THIS WAS INCREDIBLE!! However, the templates I have are made from a slightly more rigid vinyl. I believe that Trooperbay has since redesigned the template material to something more flexible to accommodate the double curve of the cheeks. "Double curve" meaning they curve front to back as well as left to right over the top. My templates will not seal completely. Plus I re-use them a lot.

Anyway, the pattern is still the same and must be taken into consideration when using them. There is a definite left and right side. As told to me by Mike himself, they are positioned on the sheet as they should be applied to the helmet. The main difference is the lowermost stripes are slightly mis-aligned curving slightly AWAY from the frown. DSCN1605_zpsdd9f7e0d.jpgFirst I need to make positioning marks. This has always been described as roughly a pencil width from the cheek itself.DSCN1607_zpsf259d2e6.jpgNext I apply the template and trace the inside of each cut out. I bust out the fine detail brush and my glasses. UGH!!!!

Gloss black is gloss black and gray is mostly gray. Testors steps up with both of these and is accompanied by fast dry times. Humbrol paints, though accurate, take up to 8 hours to fully cure. However, I will not deviate from the Humbrol paint for the tube stripes. The color here is way too important to me to get right.DSCN1608_zpsc14c6a3a.jpg After much mixing (those of you who have used Humbrols will know what I am talking about) I got to it. I CAREFULLY outline each stripe making sure to square the corners as best as I can. Coffee or other caffeinated drinks are not recommended here!!DSCN1609_zpsb6e0c1e4.jpg I breathe relief as I complete the first side.DSCN1610_zpscda33775.jpgOverall it looks pretty good. The right side was no less a challenge, but I liked the results.DSCN1611_zps42736337.jpg With the tube stripes complete and in need of some extra dry time, I moved onto the hovi tips and the vocoder. Testors makes a semi-gloss black number 1139 that is perfect!! DSCN1613_zps54fb4d8a.jpg The paint was still wet in these shots but they dried to a wonderful, mild sheen.DSCN1612_zpsb8f728f4.jpgI used a wider brush for this. With the fast dry times associated with the testors, you want to get the paint on a little faster to avoid a lot of brush marks. A wider brush will help do this. 

I let everything set up. I now can start re-assembling the helmet. Brow trim is first. DSCN1617_zpsedf5afaa.jpgI can assure you, this is not easy task. The the brow as tight as I make it, the helmet needs to be moved around and shifted just to get the trim to slide back under the two halves. DSCN1618_zpse998148a.jpgBut after that struggle, I can finally see the light at the end of the tunnel.DSCN1619_zpsb4f42bf4.jpgDSCN1620_zps115c4c8d.jpg I was contemplating NOT doing it. But this is for charity so I can't help myself. I will do the plasti-dip/cheesecloth coating on the inside. In my opinion, that really makes the helmet stand out and away from looking and feeling like a costume piece and more like a prop. It gives the helmet a certain density and weight. Something people are willing to pay a little more for. We are earning money for charity so any little bit will help.

More on this soon 

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Brilliant tutorial, detailing beautiful detailing!!

 

You've outdone yourself, my friend. Thanks for sharing!

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Excellent!

The Holy Grail of ATA helmet builds!

 

Why didn't you post before I made mine?

 

:D

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I will do the plasti-dip/cheesecloth coating on the inside. In my opinion, that really makes the helmet stand out and away from looking and feeling like a costume piece and more like a prop. It gives the helmet a certain density and weight. Something people are willing to pay a little more for. We are earning money for charity so any little bit will help.

 

Good tip. I could imagine the extra strength/rigidity that it would provide, without adding too much weight. Might have to give it a try  :duim:

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We have turned the corner and the end is near.  More progress means more pics. So, here we go!!!!

After painting the hovis, I needed to cut and install the screen.DSCN1638_zps72d1c541.jpgI dotted the edge with superglue to keep them from falling out on accident. Now that the vocoder is dry, you can see the semi-gloss, matte, satin, finish.375a4b79-61fb-4ef8-aad5-161eb8ef2792_zpsI re-installed the ears and got ready for the interior coating but needed to install the mouth screen. I usually use the heavier screen but didn't have any on hand. CA glue and a toothpick are my installation weapons.DSCN1623_zps506c6f02.jpgThe CA glue seems to have a hard time sticking to the toothpick. I dot an area on the screen then roll the toothpick around with a bit of pressure until the glue grabs the screen to the plastic.DSCN1624_zps188df83a.jpgI can get the screen to conform to the shape around each tooth.DSCN1625_zps0ccd599d.jpgWith the mouth screen istalled I can now move onto the interior coating. First a final wipedown with mineral spirits.DSCN1626_zps4b8c1264.jpgWhat I am using.DSCN1627_zps313c84b5.jpgRather than scramble around, I try to cut as many pieces as possible to start off. I inevitably will need to cut more, but it's good to have a bunch pre-cut to start off. DSCN1628_zps079b494a.jpgThe chemicals in the plasti-dip are nasty. I really suggest good ventilation here. Although the chemicals are awful, they have no affect on plastic. I have done many ATA's and even the paper thin RS with no issues. You MUST start with a base layer brushed into the helmet. Work in small sections at a time. It will skin over fairly quickly, but you do have a few minutes open time but this is why I pre-cut pieces ahead of time. As I said, brush in a base layer to a small area then lay in your cheesecloth piece.DSCN1629_zpsa6dc5413.jpgYou can see the "dip" soaking into the cheesecloth wherever my fingers touch it.  However, you will not be able to fully embed it by pushing....you must use the brush. Dip the brush into the "dip" can and get a good amount on the brush. Do NOT, however, use a brushing motion. You want to dab the brush onto the cloth. The extra dip on the brush will help the cloth to stay in place and not lift out of the first coat.DSCN1630_zps833849b2.jpgSlowly work your way around the interior until all areas are covered. Careful around the eyes and mouth. You will want to cut smaller strips for these areas.DSCN1631_zpsda113669.jpgMake sure you work this all the way to the edge.

Some will get onto your fingers. You will also get a little onto the helmet itself. IT will peel off. or just rub it with a towel. Don't get any on the paint work, though. DSCN1632_zps9d1e99a1.jpgDSCN1633_zps379f46f4.jpg Set this aside overnight to dry. The second coat will go much faster as you aren't working with the cheesecloth. Just coating your previous work. After it dries, it has a very nice matte finish to the inside. DSCN1634_zpsa8c15a72.jpgDSCN1635_zps9e4f5943.jpgDSCN1636_zps27797808.jpgWith the second coat dry, I can finally install the neck trim. PAY ATTENTION, PEEPS!!!!!! this comes up a lot regarding what adhesive to use to keep the neck trim in place.  ADHESIVE IS NOT NEEDED HERE.

First, I get my length of neck trim. I measured the opening with a tailor's tape to get the general length. Then I cut the edge very flush.DSCN1639_zpse7cee9ef.jpgI pick a spot where I want my final seam to be. I will have that at the vocoder. The main issue to why the trim does not stay on for people is because it was not installed completely to begin with. When I apply the trim, I do so with both hands with a "rolling" motion to ensure it is completely set into the groove.DSCN1640_zps6153f124.jpgUnder the chin is a critical area. If you have a gap like this:DSCN1641_zps9be5061d.jpgYour trim WILL fall off. It must be set completely into this corner.DSCN1642_zps140435ce.jpgThe easiest way to make sure you're on the right track is to just check in the trim seam to make sure it is completely set onto the edge as far as it can go.DSCN1643_zps2f47226f.jpgDo this every few inches.You can't be too sure.DSCN1644_zpsa6de7943.jpgOnce it is full installed all the way around, you will have an overlap. YOU WANT THIS!!!! Do NOT trim it flush. I will trim with 1/2 inch overlap.DSCN1645_zpsb84797ea.jpgDSCN1646_zpsd242d89f.jpgI also cut this end very flush and even. I do this with an open razor blade pushed down onto the trim.DSCN1647_zps54c58cbb.jpgI then re-install the trim using the same two handed rolling meathod to ensure it is set completely onto the edge.DSCN1648_zps6e9450a2.jpgWhen I get all the way to the seam, DSCN1649_zpsda280881.jpgI compress the trim outward from the seam in both directions until the edges come together.DSCN1650_zps9c79a7c7.jpgDSCN1651_zps650f3731.jpgA few wrinkles on the edge is to be expected.DSCN1652_zpsbd2aebd8.jpgI actually added a slight drop of CA glue and closed these up.  By having overlap and compressing the trim outward as well as making sure it is installed completely onto the edge, this outward pressure is what holds the trim in place.  

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You were wearing an apron during the cheesecloth work, weren't you? ;)

 

Looks great, brother!

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Absolutely nothing more than effect. It gives the inside a "lined" look. Fiberglass, Kevlar look. I guess it hides the seams and bolts for a more one piece design look.

For what we do, kids are going to be our biggest fans. They are shorter than us. They can see up into our helmets. I don't want a kid to see white plastic. I could just paint it black, but the effect is cool as well as giving the helmet that little bit of extra density. The inside of the bucket is the only place on the armor that is left up to the trooper. We can do whatever we want in there!!!! Why not make it cool? I know this one is for charity, but I have done the same on mine as well as many other Garrison mates.

 

Oh Tim, spongebob got a break during the lining process.........I wore "work" clothes

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At last!

With the neck trim in and the interior coating fully cured, I mounted the lenses. Like I goof I didn;t take a pic of that but you can see them in a bit. 

Now I wanted to put some general padding into the lid just so it looks a little more complete. I cut some gray foam and trimmed the edges to look more like padding and less like foam squares. DSCN1653_zps4c8d56eb.jpgI fired up the hot glue gun. Care should be taken here. Unless your glue gun has a setting (I don't know any that do) the glue will be REALLY hot. If your helmet lid is thin enough, this will be hot enough to warp the plastic as this doesn;t cool like hot wax does. You have two options: either hold a wet rag on the outside of the surface you are applying the pad to or just wait a minute for the glue to cool a bit.  I used the wait method.DSCN1654_zps37749964.jpgHere you can see all the foam installed as well as the lenses.DSCN1655_zps6eb9298d.jpg THE LAST STEP IS HERE!!!!!!!!!  A little white paint on the ear screws!!!!!!DSCN1657_zps309062c1.jpg I just sprayed some white out of a can into the cap and dabbed it on. One final polish with the rubbing compound and DONE!!!!

Dramatic music, please!!!!    To all that have responded and to all that may consult  this as a resource or a guide, I thank you. Everything I learned or developed was through other geniuses that are in this detachment. Thank you to all who have taught me.

 

 

 

DSCN1658_zps8403fdce.jpgDSCN1660_zps120d9204.jpgDSCN1661_zps1dde42c2.jpg46388188-faf0-4c15-b8cd-293687b99b9f_zps

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Absolutely nothing more than effect. It gives the inside a "lined" look. Fiberglass, Kevlar look. I guess it hides the seams and bolts for a more one piece design look.

For what we do, kids are going to be our biggest fans. They are shorter than us. They can see up into our helmets. I don't want a kid to see white plastic. I could just paint it black, but the effect is cool as well as giving the helmet that little bit of extra density. The inside of the bucket is the only place on the armor that is left up to the trooper. We can do whatever we want in there!!!! Why not make it cool? I know this one is for charity, but I have done the same on mine as well as many other Garrison mates.

 

 

 

Agree, I've painted mine black too.

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