Jump to content

Request - How-to or Tips for E6000 gluing


jeebus68
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hello,

 

I was checking out the index of current tutorials and tips about gluing. I was specifically looking for information when using E6000 glue but any gluing tips would be appreciated. http://www.whitearmor.net/forum/topic/6372-index-of-all-tutorials/ <-- The only thing that's on here is related to glue clean-up.

 

I've picked up a small tip here and there but haven't come across a thread devoted to the art of gluing. Am I just this clueless and everyone else thinks it is common sense?

 

 

 

I've been told that I should sand to-be-glued areas first, wipe down with a damp towel and then glue. But I have other questions as well.

 

They are as follows:

I saw that some glue can warp the plastic. Does this happen with most glue? Does it depend on how much you use? How can you avoid this?

Does E6000 stick as well to PVC as it does with ABS?

How much glue do I use when gluing certain pieces? How do I know I'm using the correct amount?

How long should I wait for the glue to cure? Better yet, how long do I have before it is "too late" to redo my glued mistake?

Does anyone know of any tutorial videos that show people gluing certain parts of the armor?

 

Thanks in advance,

 

Jesse

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I saw that some glue can warp the plastic. Does this happen with most glue? The only way that I know of where glue warps the pastic is if you're using a 2 part epoxy. Most of the 2 part epoxies, when you mix them together creates a chemical reaction, causing heat, which can warp or even melt the pastic. Does it depend on how much you use? Yes. How can you avoid this? Don't use gobs of glue. With E-6000 you do not have to worry about the glue heating up as it's only a 1 part glue.

Does E6000 stick as well to PVC as it does with ABS?Yes. It's works well on just about anything.

How much glue do I use when gluing certain pieces? Really depends on what you're gluing. Sand the area you want to glue, remove dust/debris, apply E-6000, wait 5 minutes, join the 2 pieces. Clamp with magnets, clamps, etc. How do I know I'm using the correct amount? With E-6000, I normally use a generous amount so that the glue squeezes out a bit when clamped. When it is dry, it's really easy to remove the excess.

How long should I wait for the glue to cure? For best results, let it cure over night. PATIENCE!!! Better yet, how long do I have before it is "too late" to redo my glued mistake? It's really never too late with E-6000. The glue stays "pliable". You can, if you're careful, take apart armor months or even years later. IMO

Does anyone know of any tutorial videos that show people gluing certain parts of the armor? I don't know of any...YET. But I'm sure someone will have something somewhere.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That would be great Vern. I'm sure there are other great tips that haven't come up yet. I'd love some action videos of people gluing parts. Especially the sniper plate that seems to be a bugger.

 

Thanks for the answers, Brian. Your information has slowly untied one of the several knots in my stomach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have used E6000 on almost everything and it sticks most anything to anything else fabric to plastic elastic to plastic, and I have used a ton in some places and less in others, no sanding has been required before use by me I havent had a warp in any of my parts, but you can use a little less on the thiner parts. having used E6000 i have taken my thighs apart at least 3 times with the help of a hobby knife after weeks in place. clean up with it is a sharp hobby knife and score and pull. its usually good overnight but full cure is 24 hours. put a little on and clamp the heck out of it overnight and you are usually good. I have used zap a gap and a kicker for smaller parts but most sucess with E6000.

Edited by Darkshadow
Link to comment
Share on other sites

first and foremost you should wipe off excess glue. second thicker sections of glue requires up to 48 hours to fully cure. usually thinner applications

take 24 hours 12 hour cure times can be used on non stress parts in warm environments. third if e6000 comes in contact with metals

and plastic, such as a snap plate, then it will generate heat during cure just like epoxy. e6000 actually does get hot under clamping pressure.

 

the entire process of glue and armor is that you have to use the correct amount of pressure applied to all parts

evenly. what you get when you clamp is what you'll get when you release the clamps.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

This seems like a good place to ask this... Does cured E-6000 stick to fresh laid E-6000? I have pulled apart my belt and drop boxes so I can transfer them to a new belt and was wondering how crazy I need to get with sanding to get the old glue off to get things to stick.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can wait until it cures and peel it with your finger.

I'm working on an E-11 Hasbro/Doopydoos conversion. Just got E6000 today but haven't used it yet but I'm curious:

 

How do you clean the extra glue (scraping, sanding, wiping)?

When is the best time to clean up the excess glue (immediately vs. wait overnight)?

 

You should be able to peel it with your finger once it cures.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 6 months later...
  • 2 years later...

Resurrecting a dead thread, as it's the only one search turned up with these types of tips.

 

One more question re E6000:

 

I know it takes 24 hours to cure, but does it need to remain clamped until fully cured, or can clamps be removed after, say, 12 hours? I'll be able to halve my assembly time if I could glue and clamp sections in the evening, let them cure for ~12 hours (overnight, say, 8pm-8am), and then pull the clamps and magnets to glue/clamp other pieces during the day (while I'm at work), leaving the first pieces otherwise unmolested for the duration of the 24 hour cure time.

 

Safe? Or would that be pushing it, and I should just leave it 100% alone for the full 24 hours?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

E600 in contact with metal, (i.e. snaps in snap plates) can cause heat and It can cause melting in abs, more like it deforms the surface I have a few spots in my armor from the past owners putting glue on the metal part. I avoid any glue on the metal part by added a small 1/2" x 1/2" square of duct tape over the back of the snap so the metal is covered. Glue away, clamp,  and wait 24 hours and you are good. The great thing is you can heat up pieces and separate them if they need adjustment or you messed up. A heat gun set at 450 degrees for about 20-30 seconds waving the heat back and forth over the piece softens it up enough to separate them I use a drywall putty knife to slip under the 2 pieces, its thin and pushes in and strong enough to lift the pieces apart. 

 

I bought a used TK suit  4 years old and had to redo all the strapping to fit me and all of it came off 4 years later cause the builder used e6000. 

 

As for dry time best to wait 24 hours, especially if it's high stress point like the inside of the shins. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

During my build thread, I took a scrap piece of ABS and glued two snaps directly to it, and it showed no ill effects whatsoever. Now, it is possible that a different batch of ABS may have a different reaction, but by and large, I believe that the fears of E6000 melting plastic due to metal has been mostly put to bed here over time.<br><br>

When it comes to removal, and assuming that you're talking about E6000 here, throw it in the freezer overnight, and use a butter knife to gently pry it loose.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 years later...

In prepping to start gluing things together, I decided to search on if E6000 reacts with the snaps. On my first build, an Anovos OTTK, I glued snap plate directly to the armor, and after time I noticed that I had what I called “Trooper Nipples” on my chest plate. Sorry, but I couldn’t help but think of the “Bat Nipple” controversy with a few of the Batman films, and decided to name it after that. I saw a video where the snaps on one plate were covered with another plate of the same size, so it wouldn’t react to the armor. I’ve decided to use that method to see if I could avoid said problem of Trooper Nipples.

Edited by TK-42134
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...