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Any tricks to deal with the ears gap properly?


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HI all,

 

 

like most everyone i want to build an helmet but what scares me the most is the ears gap part..i know that there should be some gap but i was wondering if you guys had any tips on how to avoid getting too much gap between the ears and the helmet.

 

I know that some kits seem to have some lines as guides to help you cut out but it looks like experience will help you way much more than guidelines in this case.

 

can anyone share their tips on how they got their ears to work out the way they are supposed to be?

 

cheers!

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One good tip I read at some point is to fasten them on the side then "stretch" the ears down along the side-curve so they're "tight" and drill the whole and fasten them there.

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I have seen a recent topic on this... I'll look for it.

 

found this great ------

 

4377225734_b25947005f_o.jpg

 

photo is an example from the thread

Edited by gmrhodes13
link not working, removed gmrhodes13 2020
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Ears are easy if you have a dremel. I use a cone shaped grinding stone about a half inch in diameter. Using the dremel shave off the edges and test fit it. Keep doing that till you have a fit you are happy with. When "shaving" you need to shave in one direction so that the flying debris land ahead of the dremel and not behind it. If it lands behind the tool the melted plastic will stick to the part you already cut. The other way you will cut over the new debris preserving your edge behind the dremel, If you get any white plastic accumulation at all on the stone then you are cutting too fast.

 

 

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how about maybe using some plasticine and sticking it on the side of the helmet then take this shape that the plasticine made and try to reproduce it on the ears?

 

 

i am sure a profiling gauge would do miracles...i ll have to try to find one...don't wanna mess those ears up!

 

please keep those tips coming very interesting!

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Grrr fecking ears! :angry:

I basicaly sanded and filed untill they fit (I'm STILL not happy with how they look from behind).

 

I tried the drill them and screw them down in place but I didn't have much luck. I don't really think heating them would work either.

Hopefuly you'll have more luck than I did.

It also helps if the ears and the lid are the same and you don't have ears from one lid on a recasted lid.

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I think a lot of people fall foul to the fact the trim each side the same distance

 

Front should be narrow, the rear should be thicker.

This is due to the way the helmet curves away from you by the ears

 

The front face is quite flat, but the back end of the helmet starts to curve away from you on the backcap

 

So trim one side at a time. Do the front first

Edited by john danter
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I think a lot of people fall foul to the fact the trim each side the same distance

 

Front should be narrow, the rear should be thicker.

This is due to the way the helmet curves away from you by the ears

 

The front face is quite flat, but the back end of the helmet starts to curve away from you on the backcap

 

So trim one side at a time. Do the front first

EXCELLENT point!

 

This is so true... and I take it for granted that everyone just "knows" this now and forget I once did not!

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i think ill try to find a profiler gauge , take some measurements from the front of the rear and then the back of the rear of each ear and then reproduce this on each rear.

 

there must be a gap but i saw a guy here i believe that had overdone it which was sad for him...just want to avoid that.

 

peace

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  • 3 months later...

I just finished assembling my 1st AP bucket kit, (purchased from ABS80, and a great kit BTW), and before I painted it, I sealed and smoothed my earpiece gaps. I found a great product at Home Depot for this called "High Gloss White" Tub and Tile sealant. Brand name is POLYSEAMSEAL Ultra. It smoothes on with a wet finger or applicator and makes a great seal for any serious gaps in your fit. It's paintable, and doesn't shrink over time. I let it dry about a week, and I painted my lid this morning outside.

 

Home Depot has VALSPAR brand Plastic paint, used for outside patio furniture and stuff and it works great! Made for plastic, it goes on smooth and even, and I did 3 coats. 2 light coats to start, and a medium even coat to finish. It dries to the touch in about 10 minutes between coats, and it really shines and looks great, and blends in nicely. Once it dries and cures thoroughly in about a week, I plan to use VALSPAR gloss pewter grey for my frown. I'll try to post some pics when finished, but I highly reccomend the tub n tile sealant. It smoothes out so nice.

 

Hope this helps anyone with serious ear gap issues like I had.

 

Sincerely,

NewTrooper2. :dancing-trooper:

Edited by NewTrooper2
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My solution was low-tech.

 

Learn to love the gap. :D

 

 

lol, man after my own heart!

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